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Full text of "Biographical review. This volume contains biogaphical sketches of the leading citizens of Litchfield County, Connecticut"

The original of this book is in 
the Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924028841844 



F 102L6'b6T""'™'*"^'-"'"^ 

„„„ 3 1924 028 841 844 
— Overs 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



THIS VOLUME CONTAINS BIOGRAPHICAL 
SKETCHES OF 



THE LEADING CITIZENS OF 
LITCHFIELD COUNTY 



CONNECTICUT 



" Biography is the home aspect of history 



BOSTON 
Biographical Review Publishing Company 



PREFACE. 



^^ OOD old Litchfield " in its first century as a county of Connecticut won for itself a 
1 J name as the home of men and women of high intellectual and moral worth. Single- 
minded patriots, poets, jurists, divines, philanthropists, citizens of national repute, 
here had their birth in days long gone by. These pages have mainly to do with later genera- 
tions, people now living or but recently departed from earthly scenes and labors. The present 
age not only revives the memory of the past to learn its lessons, but is happily awake to the 
duty of writing its own records, setting down what is best worth remembering in the lives of 
the busy toilers of to-day. Here are briefly chronicled the life stories of some who are descend- 
ants of Rev. Thomas Hooker's company, original proprietors of Hartford, far-sighted founders, 
in 1639, of a " government of the people, by the people, for the people " ; some of " Mayflower " 
lineage ; some representatives of later immigrants from the Old World ; and other useful, loyal 
citizens of foreign birth. The accounts here rendered are not of buried talents, but of used 
ability and opportunity. The conquests recited are of mind over matter, of cheerful labor 
directed by thought, of honest, earnest endeavor which subdues the earth and commands its 
resources in the divinely appointed way. 

It has seemed worth while to write and publish these biographies because, to borrow the 
words of an eloquent speaker, such men and women as are here comiflemorated " by their indus- 
trious toil and faithful citizenship have kept sweet the heart of New England civilization." Re- 
gard is also had to what Carlyle calls the "poetic interest" attaching to the common "struggle 
of human free will against material necessity," and the instructiveness of biographical writings, 
which he deduces from the fact that " every mortal has a problem of existence set before him, 
which, were it only — what for the most it is — the problem of keeping soul and body together, 
must be to a certain extent original, unlike every other, and yet, at the same time, like every 
other." Wherefore, it is well said, "A noble life put fairly on record acts like an inspiration." 

Biographical Review Publishing Company. 
February i, 1896. 




^:4^L.^^^i^^^^^^ ^ /iy-^^^^^^^-^^^-TD 



BIOSRAPHIGAL 




I TILLMAN LOTHROP WIL- 
SON was born June 24, 1822, 
in Warner, N.H. His father, 
Ezekiel Wilson, was of Scotch- 
Irish descent, born in Salem, 
N.H., a few miles from Lon- 
donderry, where his ancestors, 
emigrating from Londonderry in 
Ireland, settled in 17 19, naming 
their location for their old home. He was 
born in 1770, and died in Methuen, Mass., 
in 1837. Mr. Wilson's mother, Kezia Lo- 
throp Wilson, was born in Bridgewater, Mass., 
in 1787, and died in Methuen, Mass., in 
1866. Her mother^s name was Stillman. 
The Lothrops and the Stillmans were of the 
old Puritan stock, and numerous preachers of 
both families have been in active work since 
the earliest settlements in Massachusetts. 

Stillman L. Wilson, when two years of age, 
moved with his parents into Methuen, Mass. 
In July, 1832, the family had the misfortune 
to be burned out of house and home in the 
night time. The parents and eight children 
barely escaped from the flames with a scanty 
wardrobe, homeless and almost penniless. 
After looking over the situation, it was de- 
cided to move to Fall River, Mass., where 
they had just got started in building up a 
manufacturing city. There the family re- 
sided three years, and then returned to 
Methuen, where the heads of the family con- 
tinued to live and where they died. The 
children scattered, all commencing business 



on their own account; and they have all done 
their full share of it, and have had their full 
share of its profits. Mr. Wilson says that his 
trip and residence in Fall River was an eye- 
opener for him. He was then ten years old, 
and for the first time learned that Methuen 
was not the centre of the earth and that Priest 
Kimball was not the only big man in exist- 
ence. The journey of seventy-five miles to 
Fall River was made with horses and an open 
wagon, no railroads then. The story is best 
continued in Mr. Wilson's own words: ^, 

I saw Bunker Hill for the first time, the 
ships and the long rows of buildings in Bos- 
ton, as we drove from Charlestown Bridge the 
whole length of Washington Street to and 
through Roxbury. At Fall River I first saw 
the beautiful Narragansett Bay, with the ves- 
sels that were going and coming from different 
parts of the coast, and occasionally a whale- 
ship from the Pacific Ocean. Each one of them 
had some new revelation to me, and then I 
became inspired with the ideas that have had 
much to do with the shaping of rather an 
adventurous life. The sailors were all heroes 
in my mind. I listened to and dreamed over 
their tales. I read "Robinson Crusoe" and 
" Sinbad the Sailor " ; and at the mature age of 
twelve years I came to the conclusion that I 
was wasting too much precious time on this 
dull shore, and that it was best for me to 
put out. So one pleasant morning, quite 
early, I tied up a bundle of clothes in a ban- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



danna handkerchief, and carefully crept out of 
the house to go — no one knew where. I took 
the road to New Bedford, fourteen miles dis- 
tant, which was well known to me to be a 
great place for fitting out whale-ships; and I 
thought I might be lucky enough to get off on 
one of them. 

I arrived about noon. After depositing 
my worldly goods at a hotel I got a good din- 
ner, then went down to the wharf to look for 
conveyance to some other quarter of the 
globe, not caring where, if it was only a good 
way off. I saw a large, fine, tidy-looking 
ship with her flag flying, as a notice that she 
was getting ready to sail. I walked on board, 
and called for the captain. He was a gen- 
teel, nice-looking man; and I at once decided 
that he was the very man I was looking for. 
I offered my services as cabin boy. He 
looked me over for a minute or two, and the 
bargain was made, no terms for services men- 
tioned. On inquiry I learned from him that 
he was bound for New Orleans, to get a cargo 
of cotton for Liverpool. At that port he ex- 
pected to get a cargo for the East Indies, 
and he thought he might get home in about 
four years. He was to sail at 4 p.m. next 
day. I spent the night at the hotel, too 
happy to sleep much; but the visions of the 
world that I was so soon to see made it a 
night of pleasant dreams. I spent the next 
forenoon on board the ship. 

At near noontime I went up to the hotel 
for one more good shore dinner, and to get 
my precious bundle of clothes before sailing 
at four o'clock. Just as I arrived in front of 
the hotel a carriage stopped by my side; and 
I heard some one call, "Stillman." I looked 
up, and was dumfounded to see my mother. 
She invited me to take a ride. I saw big 
tears in her eyes, and I did not hesitate long 
in going for my bundle and driving home. 



We talked of everything except my running 
away. That was never spoken of by her or 
by any member of the family. And I do not 
think that any one of them has had any idea 
what my plans were. At that time I had no 
knowledge of the real hardships of a sailor's 
life, and now it looks to me that Providence 
stepped in to save me from the peril. 

Very soon after this escapade I was taken 
into a dry-goods store as a boy of all work. 
I served in Fall River, Methuen, Lowell, and 
Boston until I was twenty-one years of age. 
I always made it a point to be the first at the 
store in the morning and the last at night, to 
see everybody that came into the store, and 
show a readiness to serve them, to keep stock 
in perfect order, endeavor to make my sales as 
large as possible, and make personal friend- 
ships with the customers. In that way I was 
always wanted, and did not have to look for 
employment. In 1843 I was married to Miss 
Cornelia A. Talbot, of Fall River, who died 
of consumption at her mother's home in that 
place in November, 1859. Three children 
were born to us: Alice T. Wilson died in 
infancy at Manchester, 1844; Baylies T. Wil- 
son died at Manchester in 1846, one year old; 
Minnie Burton Wilson died in San Francisco 
of diphtheria in 1857, aged five years. 

My last clerkship ended at Lowell in the 
latter part of 1843. My employers, J. B. 
Dinsmore & Co., unfortunately failed; and 
by their influence I was appointed receiver to 
close up their business. Benjamin F. But- 
ler, who was at that time fitting for a lawyer, 
was my competitor for the position. I be- 
lieve that was the last time that he did not 
come out at the head. Mr. James M. Beebe, 
one of the most successful merchants of Bos- 
ton, was one of the largest creditors, and rep- 
resented the other creditors. That brought 
me in close contact with him. The result of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



this made him my friend; and, in talking 
with him of my future business prospects, he 
offered me credit to a large amount, with lib- 
erty to refer to him for credit from any house 
in the city of Boston. This gave me an op- 
portunity to start business, which I gladly 
and gratefully accepted, with satisfactory re- 
sults to him and myself. Any young man 
reading this will see the result of faithfully 
and earnestly serving the interest of my em- 
ployers, and they will do well not to forget it. 
In the spring of 1844 I commenced the 
dry-goods and carpet business at Manchester, 
N.H. — a manufacturing city juSt started 
into prosperity, which has gone on constantly 
from a population of some ten thousand to 
near fifty thousand — with a large stock of 
goods bought entirely on credit on my hands. 
I made myself a slave to my business from 
early morning until night. In 1847 I took 
one of my clerks as a partner, Mr. Amos Wes- 
ton, Jr., a brother of ex-Governor Weston, of 
New Hampshire. The firm became Wilson & 
Weston, which continued until January, 1849. 
At that time I was about twenty-seven years 
of age, weary and worn down almost to a skel- 
eton by my years of close attention to busi- 
ness, weighing one hundred and thirteen 
pounds only. I was casting about to see what 
was to follow. 

One morning I took up a paper, and read 
a letter written to the government by some 
army officer, giving an account of the discov- 
ery of gold in California. After reading it I 
read it to my wife. Then I said to her that I 
ought to go there. Her reply was to ask what 
I could do with her. That settled the matter 
in five minutes. I was decided to go. How 
to get there I knew not, but I was going. 
After a very few days I had sold my business 
to my partner, and arranged to place my wife 
with her mother in Fall River. Mr. John B. 



Clark, a young lawyer who sat at the table 
with us at the hotel where we boarded, an- 
nounced that he was going to California; and 
I believe that he and myself were the first two 
persons that decided to leave New Hampshire 
for the new gold fields. About the loth or 
15th of January Mr. Clark went to Boston to 
learn what conveyance could be had to take us 
to the Isthmus of Panama. He learned that 
the good ship "Corsair," Captain Choate, 
would sail for that destination on February 
I, provided a sufficient number of passengers 
could be obtained to make it pay. He at once 
gave notice of the situation, and in a few days 
about forty persons in Manchester had agreed 
to go. About as many more persons from the 
State of Maine had engaged passage, and some 
other persons, making nearly one hundred in 
all, were on board, with queer outfits, on the 
day set. 

On Friday, February i, 1849, at 4 p.m. we 
set sail for the Isthmus of Panama. A fearful 
gale with snow was blowing when we left Bos- 
ton Harbor. Some of the sailors got drunk; 
and all of them were in ill humor because we 
had to start on that unlucky day, Friday. All 
of the sailors were needed to handle the ship 
through that dreadful storm, which lasted all 
that night and through Saturday. Everybody 
else was glad to keep quiet as possible in his 
berth. Sunday morning we were in the Gulf 
Stream, with the weather clear and warm as 
summer; but the waves ran to an enormous 
height from the storm that we had passed 
through. For the rest of the Atlantic passage 
and through the Caribbean Sea all 'went well. 
February 17 we arrived at Porto Bello, a 
beautiful little harbor, nearly egg-shaped, 
perhaps a mile wide and two miles long, with 
high mountains on each side and the little 
town at the extreme end. It was our first 
view of the tropics, with their tall palms and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



many other strange-looking trees, many of 
them covered with flowers and a regular tangle 
of vines. The air was all alive with birds of 
the most beautiful plumage. It seemed to me 
that it was the realization of the dreams I 
had in. Fall River at the time I did not be- 
come a sailor. 

This port was, in the days of Spain's great 
adventui^es in South America, the Atlantic har- 
bor through which all that trade passed. The 
Pacific Coast was reached by a paved road, 
some sixty miles in length, across the Isth- 
mus to Panama. And that is all we knew of 
that part of the world. We entered Porto 
Bello with the idea of getting across the 
Isthmus on the same road that the Spaniards 
made hundreds of years ago. In a few hours 
after reaching that port we learned that the 
road had been buried out of sight from time 
out of memory. It had become an impenetra- 
ble jungle, so dense that no person could pen- 
etrate its tangled growth for one yard without 
cutting his way with an axe. We were much 
disappointed. We could hardly realize that 
such changes could have overcome that beau- 
tiful spot of earth as the result of the pirati- 
cal acts of a few hundred men, under the lead- 
ership of the pirates Kidd, Morgan, and a few 
more men of that class. Their ships were 
waiting near Panama to catch everything ar- 
riving from South America. Anything escap- 
ing them was wanted on that paved road we 
were so anxious to see. What reached the 
Spanish galleons at Porto Bello the pirates 
were waiting for in the Caribbean Sea, and 
ready to receive a broadside or give one; or 
what suited them better was a hand to hand 
battle with axes and knives. They captured 
many a fine galleon, some of which recruited 
or enlarged the piratical navy. Many of the 
sailors became expert pirates under the in- 
struction of Kidd and Morgan. Millions of 



dollars in gold, gems, and other valuables 
were secured by the pirates, all of which had 
really been taken from the Incas of Peru by 
robbery. The Spanish merchants (as they 
called themselves) were ruined. Their ships 
were driven from the sea. What remained 
of treasure in Porto Bello the pirates de- 
manded. The people were persuaded by bat- 
tle-axes and knives to prudently hand over 
everything asked for. Thus ended all busi- 
ness in that part of the world. The Spaniards 
went home to Spain. There were a few of the 
vagabond character, half-breeds and West Ind- 
ian negroes, that remained. The}' natural!}' 
mixed up with the native Indians, and pro- 
duced the miserable population now found in 
South and Central America. It resulted in 
that part of the American continent becoming 
so insignificant that no information could be 
obtained in regard to it. And what was most 
important to us was that we innocent Yankees 
got deluded into Porto Bello by reading the 
story of the pirates who existed some hun- 
dreds of years ago. 

The chief officer at Porto Bello informed 
our Captain Choate that by going up the coast 
to the mouth of the Chagres River we could 
get canoes to take us up to near the river 
head, twenty-eight miles from Panama, to 
which place there was a very fair mule path. 
Captain Choate objected to going to Chagres, 
as there was no safe anchorage at that place. 
We anchored at an inlet called Navy Bay, 
some twelve miles from Chagres. Nothing 
was there to indicate that anybody had ever 
been there before us. It was afterward called 
Aspinwall, and is now Colon, a nice little 
harbor. It is the terminus of steamships, 
connecting there with the Panama Railroad', 
also the eastern terminus of the projected De 
Lesseps great ship canal to the Pacific Ocean. 
No time was lost in getting a boat off for 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



13 



Chagres, whence plenty of good-sized dug- 
out canoes came promptly, and transported all 
the passengers and their luggage to Chagres. 
This little town of five hundred inhabitants 
had an old Spanish fort and about fifty hovels 
built of reeds, mud, and grass. The people 
all looked diseased and filthy. We estimated 
that the entire population of five hundred 
men, women, and children possessed about 
five hundred yards of cotton cloth as clothing, 
all the way from nothing up to three yards 
each, most of them nothing, also a home-made 
straw hat for each one. It is a deadly place 
for Yankees. We were happy to get there 
and a hundred times more happy to get away 
on our journey to Panama. 

All the passengers of the "Corsair" soon 
arranged for transportation up the Chagres 
River. Four other persons with myself se- 
cured a large dug-out canoe, which took us 
with about one ton of luggage, with four pole 
men for a propelling power, to Gorgona in a 
little less than three days, distance unknown. 
As the river was so winding in its course it 
would be unsafe to estimate it. We passed 
en route some twenty little ranches, where a 
few scrawny little cattle and a dozen or two 
chickens comprised the total stock. Each 
place had a few rods of ground cleared up, 
where a very little corn and a few tropical 
fruit trees supplied all the wants of a family. 
They had nothing to sell. Fortunately we 
had our provisions with us: and, as the beau- 
tiful and strange scenery every rod of the way 
up the river was free, we had a most delightful 
trip, never to be forgotten. The trees, plants, 
and vines, the parrots, monkeys, alligators, 
and a thousand other things, all new to us, 
made every minute pass pleasantly. Through 
the night the roaring of tigers, or jaguars, 
cougars, and other animals kept us in mind 
we were in the tropics. 



We found Gorgona located on a bluff some 
sixty feet above the river, a good camping 
ground and quite a healthful place. We de- 
cided to remain there until we could get in- 
formation from Panama in regard to the 
chances of getting transportation to San Fran- 
cisco. In a few days we learned that twenty 
thousand people were there waiting passage, 
and not a vessel of any description that could 
be chartered or sold in that port. We also 
learned that cholera and isthmus fever were 
very prevalent there, and we thought it wise 
to remain where we were until something 
should turn up. After waiting there some ten 
days Dr. William W. Brown, of Manchester, 
N.H., my camping companion, and myself 
decided to put out for Panama and avail our- 
selves of the very first opportunity to go ahead. 
We made a bargain with eight natives to go 
in one gang to carry our "cargo," as they 
call it, and we to go along with them on foot. 
We were to get started the next morning, but 
it had got to be about noon when we learned 
that they were all that ti^e disputing about 
who should carry a large packing trunk, 
weighing two hundred and twenty pounds. I 
soon adjusted that matter by giving a big 
negro sixteen dollars to take it over, twenty- 
eight miles. He adjusted a strap near one 
end of the trunk, the two ends of the strap 
passing over his shoulders and under his arms, 
the trunk reaching far above his head, with 
most of the weight bearing on his shoulders. 
Near the top of the trunk was another strap 
that passed over his forehead, by which he 
could steady the load by pushing his head f9r- 
\yard or holding it back. 

At 4 P.M. we started. All of the other 
packages they carried weighed from one hun- 
dred and twenty-five to one hundred and sev- 
enty-five pounds each, and were adjusted like 
the large trunk. All the people in town were 



14 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



out to see us off. The dogs barked as the 
men started off on a dog trot. Dr. Brown 
and myself followed on at a lively walk, 
knowing that our carriers could not keep up 
that gait very long. After going about a mile 
all the carriers backed up to rocks by the side 
of the path, each setting the lower end of his 
package on the rocks carefully, pushed the 
strap back from their foreheads, and took a 
good rest, having a jolly conversation. This 
continued to be their method for the entire 
trip. At sunset we arrived at a little clearing 
and a tent, where a man was located, prepared 
to furnish a meal to hungry travellers for one 
dollar. We decided to invest. The coffee, 
hard sea biscuit, and a meat stew that tasted 
extra nice satisfied us perfectly. We lay 
upon the warm ground that night with our 
boots for a pillow. The wild animals and 
birds were plenty enough and near enough to 
be quite sociable; and kept us from being 
lonesome. We had our toilets arranged quite 
early in the morning; and, as breakfast was 
not ready, we went on an exploring expedition 
about the wayside inn. We saw the feathers 
of many different kinds of birds, but mostly 
from the parrot. We also saw several monkey 
skins and one monkey with his hide being 
taken off. On inquiry we learned that the 
fine stew we ate the night before was monkey 
and parrot. We did not feel very hungry for 
meat that morning, and coffee and biscuit were 
all that we required. 

Before noon that day we had a good view of 
the Pacific Ocean from the very point, as it is 
said, whence Balboa got his first view of 
that water and named it Pacific Ocean. At 
4 P.M. we arrived at Panama. Its massive 
stone walls, its large churches, its old monas- 
teries and nunneries of enormous size, were 
new scenes to us. More than one-half of the 
city was in ruins. It must have been a hand- 



some city when new; but, with time, in a hot 
moist climate everything seems to rot and 
crumble. There was much to look at of in- 
terest that would furnish food for thoughtful 
study for a lifetime. There was a little sign 
of reviving life in the city, caused by the 
advent of strangers from all along the Central 
and South American states. News of gold 
discoveries in California reached those locali- 
ties in advance of any information we had in 
the eastern part of the continent. The result 
was a wild rush of people to Panama by any 
means possible to get them there, rather of a 
mixed lot, colors graded all along from white 
to jet black, languages ranging all the way 
from the melodious Spanish through the 
Dutch to Digger Indian. "Swear language" 
seemed to be the most prevalent. We found 
comfortable lodgings with a private Spanish 
family, opposite the plaza and the great cathe- 
dral. We had wholesome meals at a hotel, 
and it seemed as if we ought to enjoy a few 
weeks in Panama; but the constant funeral 
processions passing our door night and day 
was a constant reminder that Panama was a 
good place to get away from. Cholera and 
isthmus fever were doing deadly work. 

Sunday morning we followed along with the 
funeral procession to see what kind of a place 
Panama was to be buried in. The cemetery 
was a short distance outside of the city walls, 
perhaps ten acres in extent. The central part 
was used for burying the uncared for and un- 
known. The whole was enclosed with a thick 
wall, in which were three rows of oven-like 
openings, one above the other. Each one of 
these places was for the reception of one per- 
son, a private tomb, which for eight dollars 
could be occupied until it was required for 
another eight-dollar customer. We could see 
no vacancies, but saw where they were raking 
out the bones from several of these little 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



IS 



tombs. There must have been, more than one 
shipload .of those bones lying round loose 
under foot everywhere. Numerous large black 
birds were tamely walking about the cemetery, 
ready to pick up anything they wanted. 
They are much prized there, as they serve as 
scavengers of the city. We were not favora- 
bly impressed with the cemetery, and decided 
not to invest in it. In fact Dr. Brown said 
he would not take one of those holes in the 
wall for eight cents. I offered to buy one of 
them for eight dollars if they would wait for 
their pay until I returned from California 
with the gold I was going to dig. The tomb 
vender, who looked very dirty, in the garb of 
a priest, seemed indignant at my offer, and 
said, "Marlow, marlow, vamose" ("Bad, bad, 
get out"). We got out, and have never been 
anxious to return, even if we never got an 
oven for a resting-place. The forenoon of 
that day was devoted to mass and religious 
processions. In the afternoon the most of the 
population naturally went to the cock pit, to 
enjoy the sport of cock fighting. The priests 
were the most prominent people there, and 
the most liberal, and seemed to enjoy it the 
most. 

That day's experience did not exhilarate 
our spirits much, and we were more anxious 
than ever to get off on our proposed journey; 
but we could see no prospect of doing so for 
months. It seemed as if we had taken a leap 
in the dark, with but a faint idea where we 
should land. An old whale-ship, "The Equa- 
tor," of New Bedford, Captain Mathews, on its 
voyage home had touched in at Callao. On 
hearing of the situation at Panama, Captain 
Mathews shipp2d his oil home on a vessel 
bound to New Bedford, bought a cargo of flour 
at five dollars a barrel, took it to Panama, and 
sold it for twenty dollars a barrel. Before it 
could be landed he sold one hundred and sixty 



tickets for passengers to San Francisco, Cal. 
It was a small ship of about three hundred 
tons' measurement. This was done about the 
time we arrived at Panama. No other vessel 
was there, and we had no idea when there ever 
would be another. The situation seemed des- 
perate. We accidentally became acquainted 
with two young men from Providence, R.I., 
who had tickets for "The Equator." They 
seemed down-spirited and homesick, and said, 
if they had not got their tickets, they thought 
they would turn round and go back home. 
We very soon showed them that there would 
be no loss, but a profit, on the tickets. We 
all felt much better when those tickets were 
in our pockets and the money was in theirs. 
It was but a few days before we were on 
board of our ship at the island of Toboga, 
twelve miles down the bay from Panama. 
This was about March 1 5, six weeks from Bos- 
ton. This ship was built in 1812 for a pri- 
vateer, was of a good model for sailing, when 
she was fitted for a whale-ship. The space 
between decks was made four and a half feet 
high, just right to stow away oil in. That 
was at Panama fenced off into pens, one board 
high, each pen for ten passengers, seven by 
twelve feet. Think of it, ten men to occupy 
twelve feet! If they had all been of my size, 
it would appear possible to make it do. As 
it was, it was a very tight squeeze. As I 
was not quite as thick as I was broad, I was 
obliged to take my position on my side and 
stay there. Being on the floor, there was no 
fear of falling out of bed. We were within a 
few degrees of the equator, the hottest place 
on earth. There was not a chair, table, or 
an earthen dish on the ship; and, to our 
amazement, we found that there were no pro- 
visions on the ship except what was left over 
by the sailors on their three years' whaling 
voyage, not even flour. The water was in 



i6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



impure oil casks, and smelled very rank. The 
meat, beef and pork, was fair, considering its 
age. The sea biscuit was so hard that it 
could not be eaten until it was broken up with 
an iron maul, or soaked in water or tea, 
either process revealing from each biscuit 
dozens of weevils and small maggots. The 
tea was the ten-cent kind, three pounds for a 
quarter, cheapest molasses for sweetening, 
and a very little China rice. That was our 
full bill of fare on the ship. We found out 
these facts when we were under sail, too late 
to change anything. Captain Mathews was 
the one responsible person in this case. His 
sole idea of life was to save every cent that 
ever came his way, no matter what suffering 
and wrong were done to others. It took but a 
few short hours to get the ill will and hatred 
of every person on board the ship. It would 
seem as if the curses that were heaped upon 
him were enough to sink his craft to the 
bottom of the ocean. 

When a few days out, I was attacked with 
isthmus fever, about forty cases in all on the 
ship. It is easy to imagine that it was not 
a very comfortable place for sick people. 
Nevertheless, all but one recovered in two or 
three weeks. Poor Brownell from Iowa died. 
His body was sewed up in a piece of old sail 
cloth, with a few chunks of iron at his feet, 
placed on a plank at the side of the vessel, 
and slid down into the water. That was a sad 
day for all of us. When we left Panama it 
was estimated that we should make San Fran- 
cisco in from fifty to sixty days. When we 
had been out six weeks, we had worked, or 
drifted, down near the equator, and made a 
little west; but we were as far from San 
Francisco as the day we sailed. Most of the 
time we were in a dead calm, with the sails 
flapping every way. Occasionally we got a 
little breeze that put us toward our destina- 



tion. Perhaps the next day, on taking an ob- 
servation and reckoning, we would find the 
current had carried us back as many miles as 
we gained by our nice breeze. 

We were at length informed by Captain 
Mathews that one-half of our provisions were 
exhausted, and that we must at once be put on 
short allowance. We put in at Cocus Island, 
the only land we saw on our Pacific voyage. 
It is a high rock, several miles in extent, un- 
inhabited; but it has several times been ex- 
plored since our visit by persons looking for 
Kidd's treasures, as tradition says it was one 
of his places for hiding his valuables. We 
took on water from a waterfall near a narrow 
beach. As provisions were so short, we could 
not afford to waste one hour by unnecessary 
delay; and there was no possibility of getting 
a pound more of anything until we got to our 
journey's end. Our rations were two biscuits 
and a piece of beef or pork the size of my two 
fingers each day, with a pint of water at 
morning and night. As the case was getting 
more and more desperate, the wind increased 
to almost a gale, sending us over the sea at a 
rapid rate. It appeared to me that Providence 
had come to our aid to save us from our perils. 
There were many solemn faces, a few 
prayers, and many curses, all aimed at our 
captain's head. Many an oath was made that, 
if Captain Mathews should ever be caught on 
shore, he would be shot at sight. After 
forty-six years of deliberation I have a settled 
conviction that he was the meanest man I have 
ever met. I well remember while in our 
perilous position that I had a strong convic- 
tion that, if ever I got on shore alive, and had 
a crust of wholesome bread and a cup of pal- 
atable water, I would never complain for the 
want of acceptable food; and I think no one 
has, since I put foot on shore, ever heard me 
complain of the food set before me. We had 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



17 



a very lively sail to a point about fifteen hun- 
dred miles south and west of San Francisco. 
There we tacked ship, and headed directly for 
our port in a wind current that almost always 
blows fresh down that part of the Pacific. 
We were happy then. 

One morning the captain got a good obser- 
vation of the sun, the first for several days. 
We were all taking our scanty breakfast. 
The meal was not taken under very favorable 
circumstances, as at most of the meals when 
the wind blew we could either sit down on the 
deck, where we had found all the soft places 
to rest, or put one arm round some ratline, 
or take a turn of some rope round the body to 
steady ourselves from pitching over, and still 
retain in our hands our precious tin plate and 
tin cup. While thus situated, the captain 
gave word that, " if the wind holds as it is, 
we will be in San Francisco at four o'clock in 
the afternoon." Well, there was a time then. 
Men yelled, screeched, and screamed, as if the 
lower regions had broken loose. Most of the 
tin cups and plates were thrown into the sea. 
An old bass drum on board got a good beat- 
ing. The fat man from Missouri got out his 
fiddle, on which we had heard him play the 
"Arkansaw Traveller" most of the time every 
day for three months. Now it had to talk. 
He determined that it should rise above the 
howling of the storm, and surely it did. I 
never saw so much happiness expressed in a 
little crowd as at that time on that weather- 
beaten little ship; but I did not hear any one 
say, "Thank God." 

We were sailing under reefed topsails, and 
we Were plunging in big waves that made the 
ship tremble. The captain seemed to be 
looking aloft, then at sea, which seemed to be 
getting rougher. Finally he said, "Boys, we 
have either got to have an empty belly or a 
wet jacket," then gave the sailors an order 



to "shake out the main topsail." That was 
quickly done. In less than a minute the ship 
went down a big wave with more force than 
ever; and, as her bow struck the next wave, 
it was with such force that the main boom, a 
timber two feet in diameter, snapped off like 
a pipe stem near the bow of the ship. From 
the boom there were several iron chains and 
heavy ropes attached to the masts and yards. 
The ship immediately swung round into the 
troughs of the sea, rolling until it looked 
as if we might go bottom side up. As she 
would roll back and forth, with the chains and 
ropes swinging across the deck with such force 
that a person's life would not be safe for a min- 
ute on the deck, everybody went between 
decks in a hurry, and wondered what would 
come next. The topmasts went one at a 
time, yards came down with crash after crash. 
The outlook at that time was that we should 
all be at the bottom of the sea shortly. Every- 
body looked and felt solemn, and it was a 
dumb soul that did not at that time realize 
that there was a God in the wind and on the 
waves. Men prayed then who had never 
prayed before. Gold was forgotten. The 
homes and loved ones so many miles away 
were brighter and dearer than ever before. 
No one ever saw a greater change in the looks 
and actions of men in a few minutes than at 
this time. 

When everything that the wind and waves 
could move had gone over into the sea, and 
there was nothing standing that could fall, 
the captain and sailors ventured outside to in- 
spect the situation. Fortunately there were 
on board as passengers five or six old sea 
captains and at least fifty old sailors. Soon 
we saw them all busy, getting out from below 
the decks somewhere extra spars, ropes, and 
sails, carried by all ships to use in an emer- 
gency. Men never worked with a better will 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



or with better judgment, and in about two 
hoars they had got out something that served 
as a jib boom with a sail set. We were soon 
swung round, head on to the sea; and we 
were again pointed for San Francisco. In a 
few hours more we had on as much canvas as 
the sea and wind would safely allow. Many 
then said with reverence, "Thank God." 
About midnight we came suddenly right up 
in near view of Farallon Island, forty miles 
south west of San F'rancisco — a dirty jumble 
of rocks, which look as if they were made on 
purpose to smash up ships. We were right 
up to the breakers. As quick as possible we 
whirled round, just in time to avoid the 
rocks. It did then seem as if we were 
doomed. No one wanted to talk any more 
that night. It was a good time for reflection. 
We could clearly see that we were helpless 
creatures; that God only could temper the 
winds and the waves, and guide our frail 
ship. 

At noon the ncNt day, ninety days from 
Panama, June i6, 1849, we arrived in the har- 
bor of San Francisco. We had left on board 
of the ship only one more day's water and 
provisions, a rather close call. There was 
no wharf in San Francisco at that time. Row- 
boats took the passengers and luggage to the 
beach. Dr. Brown with myself located near 
the beach, where there was a spring of nice 
water, which we appreciated. I at once went 
to gathering up sticks for a fire. In a very 
short time the coffee-pot of water was boiling; 
and Dr. Brown came from the street with a 
beefsteak, a loaf of baker's bread, and a package 
of ground coffee. Perhaps that meal was not 
good, but in memory it was much the best 
meal I have ever eaten. We ate and drank 
moderately, then put up our tent, lay our 
blankets on the soft sand, and we were ready 
to receive callers and to call up anybody we 



wanted to talk with that happened to be pass- 
ing that way. Our locality was called Happy 
Valley. I think the Palace Hotel now stands 
on the ground we occupied. On one side of 
the plaza there was an old Mexican adobe 
(unburned brick) one-story building. I do 
not think there was another building in the 
city except Sherman & Ruckle's store. 
There were several hundred tents, both small 
and larger ones. They were used as dwellings, 
hotels, stores, offices, etc. Much the larger 
part of merchandise was piled up outdoors, 
with a small tent by the side of it, to use as 
office and sleeping quarters. Perhaps there 
were a very few small houses that I did not 
see, or that have escaped my memory. 

Only a little more than a year before this 
date the Mexican War had closed, and the 
United States had received California in 
settlement for the damage zuc had done Mexico. 
There were at this date no officers from either 
Mexico or the United States authorized to 
speak or act for either government, and no or- 
ganized government among the people at that 
time in California. Everybody was for him- 
self, but woe to the man who infringed upon 
the rights of other people. There was no 
quarrelling or fist-fighting there. The bullet, 
the knife, or a slip-noose of hempen rope gen- 
erally settled all serious wrongs in a very 
short time — no courts or jails, but lots of 
justice. Before the discovery of gold the 
United States government had contracted for 
several steamers to go out there by the way of 
Cape Horn (seventeen thousand miles), to 
serve as mail steamers and for all legitimate 
business from the south and Central American 
and Mexican coasts. Two of those steamers 
had arrived at San F"rancisco before we got 
there, and had gone down the coast to com- 
mence regular trips to and from Panama, 
touching at several Mexican ports. There 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



19 



were also established steam lines from New 
York and New Orleans to the Isthmus of Pan- 
ama. These two return steamers to Panama 
took the first reliable and intelligent account 
of the situation on the Pacific side of the world 
and of the way and means of getting there. 
They also took lots of gold to show what it 
was like. 

For several days Dr. Brown and myself de- 
voted our time to gathering up information in 
regard to the gold discoveries and other mat- 
ters that might decide us in our future ac- 
tions. Anything a man wanted to buy was at 
an enormous price: anything he wanted to sell 
would bring nothing, as everybody was going 
somewhere, and could not care for it. The 
mistake of a lifetime was that we did not lo- 
cate right where we were, buy everything that 
was cheap, and sell to people who were hunt- 
ing for the kinds of goods we had bought. I 
will only mention one article that was much 
wanted, and none for sale; but every vessel 
that arrived had a few boards or planks for 
their own convenience, which were fitted into 
frames, to cover over with canvas and make 
first-class houses. The price of all lumber, 
ranging all the way from hemlock to mahog- 
any, was three dollars a foot, board measure. 
But we had come very far through much tribu- 
lation to dig gold. We took passage on a 
forty-ton schooner for Stockton, the head of 
navigation on the San Joaquin (pronounced 
San Warkeen) River, passage thirty dollars. 
That trip occupied about four days, distance 
near one hundred miles. There we engaged 
for the carrying of our luggage by a mule 
train that was bound for Woods Creek and 
Jamestown, near Sonora and Morman Gulch, 
where gold diggings were numerous. While 
waiting over at Stockton for a day or two for 
the mule train to get ready, we saw a man 
seated on a wine keg in a lumber wagon being 



driven to a large tree that stood in the princi- 
pal street. As there was quite a crowd fol- 
lowing the team, we followed on with them. 
When the team halted under the tree, a rope 
was thrown over a limb, a slip-noose adjusted 
at the man's neck, and the team drove on — 
all done in five minutes. We heard that 
he had been caught stealing something. 

We were finally off across San Joaquin val- 
ley for Knight's Ferry on the Stanislaus 
River. The first night we halted at Morman 
Slough near sunset, near twelve miles out. 
The eighty mules arrived ahead of us. They 
all Went into the pool at once to drink and 
flounder in the water, making it a very thin 
mush, too thick to drink and too thin to chew. 
The filth they left behind them made it about 
half and half. We arrived soon on foot, hun- 
gry and tired, but more thirsty; no water to 
be had except from that pool. Well, from 
our experience on "The Equator" we thought 
we would not be too particular, and drank 
enough of that beverage to quench our thirst. 
Persons who had eaten monkey soup, drunk 
" Equator " water and Morman Slough mix- 
ture, ought to be tough enough to take al- 
most anything without making a wry face. 
The next day we were to travel to Stanislaus 
River, twenty-five miles, with no water except 
what we should carry from that pool. We 
were up betimes, and ate breakfast, ready to 
start at four o'clock, with the hope of reach- 
ing the river before the hottest part of the 
day. We took along one quart of the Morman 
Slough mixture to use in case of necessity. 
We took the well-travelled trail in a smooth 
country. We started off at a good walking 
gait; and by the time the sun was up we were 
tired, and glad to taste of our bottle of nectar, 
and before we had got half-way to the river 
we had exhausted the last drop. 

We knew there was no way to get another 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



drop, and the more we thought of that the 
more anxious we were to have it. There was 
no way for us but to push on — but to push on 
in that blazing sun, the thermometer above 
one hundred degrees, not a tree or a shrub or 
a rock for all that twenty-five miles, no 
chance for a minute's rest, unless we should 
sit down on the hard hot ground. On making 
the rise of a little higher land we saw, a 
quarter of a mile away, what appeared to be 
an abrupt bank, with a little shady spot that 
might afford us a place for rest; and we were 
eager to enter the underground shade. When 
we were within a rod of that place, we dis- 
covered tracks that showed us we were just 
entering a grizzly bear's den. We very soon 
came to the conclusion that we were not near 
as tired as we had thought. We retired to 
the old trail in good order, but at a better gait 
than when we approached the place of rest. 
We imagined that when we got to the top of 
that elevation we should see some sign of the 
river. It was about noon. We were suffer- 
ing much from thirst, but the hope of soon 
seeing pure water kept us in tolerable spirits. 
When we got on top of that elevation we could 
see another one a few miles ahead of us like 
the one just passed. I think before we saw 
the river that we passed over as many as six 
or eight of those elevations a mile or two 
apart (rolling prairie). Our tongues got as 
dry as a piece of velvet and too large to keep 
entirely in our mouths. Even our lungs felt- 
as if every bit of moisture was gone from 
them. • It seemed as if we must lie down and 
die; but we staggered on and on, from the 
conviction that the next elevation must reveal 
to us that water which was life to us. 

Finally, from the last of those elevations 
a most heavenly view all of a sudden was be- 
fore us. Right at our feet was a lovely val- 
ley, full of live-oaks, and that beautiful river 



right from the snow-tipped mountains rushing 
through and down past them. We staggered 
on as best we could to the first tree. There 
some Mexicans with many mules were en- 
camped. They had cooked and eaten their 
dinner (3 p.m.); and the greasy kettle, in 
which some remnants of a stew were left, had 
been filled with water. It stood in the hot 
sun, and was well covered with dust. When 
we reached that pail it seemed as if we had 
taken our last step. We at once were down 
by the side of that pail, and from it were 
drinking the most precious water man ever 
saw. The horrors of the thirst we had 
suffered for four or five hours before reaching 
that sacred spot cannot be described or under- 
stood unless one has had experience of that 
kind. We would have given all we possessed 
or ever expected to have for a few spoonfuls 
of that lukewarm water that saved our lives. 
We lay there upon the ground too exhausted 
to move. Occasionally we took moderate 
doses from that pail; and now I have no doubt 
but Providence placed it there, in its luke- 
warm condition, to preserve our lives. The 
ice-cold water only a few rods from us would 
surely have killed us if taken while we were 
in the sad condition we found ourselves when 
we arrived at that dinner pot. It was nearly 
four hours that we lay there before we could 
get up life enough to move on a few rods to 
the river bank. Knight's Ferry was there. 
A rope was stretched across the stream, per- 
haps four rods wide, and made fast at both 
ends. A few dry logs were made into a raft, 
upon which we stood, and pulled our way over, 
price one dollar a head. We found a tent on 
the bluff near the river, where we were served 
with a typical California meal of those days 
— beef fried with salt pork, boiled beans, 
fried flapjacks, dried-apple sauce, and coffee, 
price everywhere one dollar. Our Mexican 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



muleteers arrived just before dark. Un- 
doubtedly they took plenty of water. They 
are used to that kind of a life, and know how 
to get along with it. Twenty years later I 
went across San Joaquin valley, near the route 
travelled this day. It was then a continuous 
grain field, with here and there fine orchards 
and vineyards, and windmills raising plenty 
of water from shallow wells. 

We moved on in the morning over a good 
trail. For the first time we were in the foot- 
hills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Pure 
springs of water were plenty; and everything 
was enjoyable except the lameness of our legs 
and soreness of our feet, which made it un- 
comfortable to walk. We started in advance 
of the mule train, and kept ahead. We ar- 
rived at Woods Creek, where we first saw the 
gold diggings. We found a camp of about 
one hundred miners, and we decided to locate 
there until we could look over that place and 
the numerous diggings in that vicinity. Our 
whole outfit for the work consisted of picks, 
shovels, and milk pans. Everybody that 
worked got from five to twenty dollars' worth 
of gold each day. We were told that a few 
little pockets had been struck where larger 
sums had been taken out. At Jamestown and 
Sonora, also at Morman Gulch, were very 
lively camps. Some rich strikes had been 
made at each of these places, and the lucky 
ones were at the gambling-tables, trying to 
make money easier; but, of course, they all 
got "broke" in a short time. Gambling and 
the vices that go with it made almost every 
miner poor. 

The most of the people there were from 
Mexico, Lower California, and Chile — Yankees 
scarce. After two weeks' stay in that neigh- 
borhood we heard of Murphy's diggings, some 
twenty miles to the north, where, it was said, 
pieces of gold were larger, and plenty of unoc- 



cupied ground for the new-comer. We pulled 
up stakes, and made the trip in a day and a 
half with our own horses, swimming the 
Stanislaus River, some twenty miles above 
Knight's Ferry. We were soon encamped at a 
beautiful spot at the lower end of the little 
valley, and took up a good claim for gold 
digging. About five feet down through a 
gravelly soil we came to a clayey formation, 
where gold was found, mostly from the size of 
a kernel of wheat to the size and shape of a 
bean or a pumpkin seed. We were obliged to 
carry the dirt for washing either in pans or 
sacks some fifty rods. It was with me a te- 
dious business. Swinging a pickaxe or a shovel 
and packing our precious dirt tired me beyond 
endurance. Dr. Brown was much stronger 
than I; but, as we divided equally all the gold 
we obtained, I was ambitious to do my half of 
the work. About one week's work was done 
at this place with satisfactory results. It was 
noon. The sun was pouring down into the 
hot hole where we were at work. I put down 
my shovel; and I said to the doctor: "This is 
all very nice, but I shall never swing a shovel 
or a pick again for gold. No more gold dig- 
ging for me." The doctor was much sur- 
prised, dropped his pickaxe, and raising his 
hands inquired what I was going to do. 
"Well, I am going' to build a shanty, then go 
down to San Francisco, and buy a stock of 
goods, and try merchandising right there 
where our tent stands." In ten minutes it 
was agreed that he and I were to share alike 
in his gold digging and my trading business. 
We went back into the pine woods near us, 
and picked out the smallest trees we could 
find, six to ten inches in diameter. Our only 
tools were a hatchet and hand-saw, that we had 
taken with us from New Hampshire. The 
trees came down, were cut into proper lengths, 
and some of them split in halves. We set up 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



these sticks firmly in the ground, above sur- 
face six feet on sides and ends of the shanty, 
put on plates put up a ridge pole and rafters, 
all tied together with strips of rawhide fur- 
nished us by the butcher, Ben Marshall, who 
a few years later became a well-known poli- 
tician. Our house frame was twenty feet 
by thirty. We wove into the roof and sides 
pine boughs to keep out the sun, and as a 
"protection" against burglars we hung up two 
sheets, to swing apart in the day-time for a 
door. At night we closed up by fastening tliem 
together ivitli a pin. A back door was never 
made; but we had our little cloth tent at the 
rear of the store, where we slept on the ground 
in our blankets, and where we had beautiful 
dreams of home. We had plenty of good 
water. Fresh beef and mutton were only one 
bit (twelve and one-half cents) a pound. 
Salt, flour, beans, salt pork, old hams, rice, 
and most of the other staples were only fifty 
cents a pound. Our pioneering days seemed 
to be over. We were happy, and why should 
we not be'/ Beef, water or coffee, and slap- 
jacks every day — that was enough. 

It was near the ist of August that I started 
for Stockton on horseback. Made the trip 
(seventy-five miles) in three days. I crossed 
the three branches of the Calaveras River, where 
there was but little water at that time. There 
was plenty of water for drinking as often as I 
wanted it. Several tents had been put up on 
the road, where refreshments could be obtained ; 
and there were large trees all the way, and 
clumps of manzanita and other shrubs were oc- 
casionally seen. I carried my own provisions, 
and made my own coffee. At night after I 
had eaten supper I always led my horse to one 
of those clumps of bushes, one-fourth or one- 
half a mile from the road, where I slept com- 
fortably, the horse being picketed as much out 
of sight as possible. There were numerous 



wild animals roaming about, but I considered 
a man the most dangerous of all the aaimals. 
I was satisfied to get into a place where a man 
was not likely to find me. I made numerous 
trips over this route in course of the season, 
and always adopted this method of camping at 
night. With my blankets for a wrap and my 
saddle for a pillow, and plenty of elbow room 
and fresh air, it was about right. At Stock- 
ton I got passage on a small schooner to San 
Francisco. I at once made for the post-ofifice, 
hoping to get news from home. A steamer 
had come up from Panama, and brought some 
mail from somewhere; but I could get no let- 
ter for myself or Dr. Brown or for anybody 
else. The postmaster had only arrived a short 
time before, and the shanty in which he had 
fixed up for business was in great confusion. 
It was a sad day to me, si.x months from home 
and not one word to be learned. I was a lit- 
tle homesick. I got together such merchan- 
dise as I thought I wanted, and went back to 
Stockton with it on a little freight schooner. 
I soon had a Mexican pack train on the road 
to Murphy's camp, freight fifteen cents a 
pound. I arrived there with my horse some 
days ahead of the train. In a few weeks I re- 
peated the trip. I obtained a hatful of let- 
ters. I took a seat on a barrel opposite the 
plaza, and read them. There was no bad 
news, and it was a great relief to find that I 
was not entirely cut off from communication 
with home. It took me but a few days to get 
back to Stockton and get off my mule train 
again. Dr. Brown's letters informed him of 
the death of one of his children. It was sad 
news to him, and there was sadness in our 
tent, where we could but have deep sympathy. 
I believe he then wished he had stayed at 
home, and perhaps saved his child's life. 

In September there arrived at our camp a 
party of about twelve brainy men. They had 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



23 



come through from Texas on large fine mules, 
and pitched their tents near our store, where 
they remained several weeks. They did not 
want to dig, but they came on their legitimate 
business — ■ politics. Among them were Major 
Roman, Dr. Ashe, Judge Terry, and others 
whose names at present are out of mind. 
They soon became the leading men in the pol- 
itics of the State. I never saw twelve men 
together who were as handsome and accom- 
plished as they. When they left our camp, 
they went their several ways to different parts 
of the State, and laid the wires that called a 
Constitutional convention of their chosen 
friends, had it submitted to Congress, where 
it was approved, and in a few months Cali- 
fornia was made a State. Of course the men 
that led off kept the lead for themselves and 
their Southern friends. They had done good 
work; and the down-east Yankees, having 
other business, did not want the offices. As 
there were not a sufficient number of Southern 
men in California to fill all the offices created 
in the next year or two, these leaders ordered 
from home all their poor relations, who were 
soon provided for. Soon after a custom- 
house was established. It was called the Vir- 
ginia poor-house, and it was for many years 
referred to by that appellation. This is quite 
a digression from the purpose of this paper; 
but it is important history of early California, 
in which I had a small share of experience and 
observation. 

August and September worked a great 
change in California. Some thousands of 
bright energetic men arrived from the business 
centres of the Eastern States, all moved by 
that magic word, "gold." The ships that 
started early were arriving rapidly, and mer- 
chandise was piled up in great quantity over 
the sandy acres. It was then that the real 
business of establishing the great city of San 



Francisco commenced. The lack of building 
materials was the great drawback, but every- 
body was busy providing some temporary shel- 
ter. Common laborers received sixteen dol- 
lars a day for their services. Everybody had 
full pockets who tried to do anything, and 
made good use of their money. House frames 
were ordered from the East in great quantity, 
with zinc or sheet iron for covering; but it 
required about six months to get the order 
to New York, delivered by way of Cape 
Horn, seventeen thousand miles. In Novem- 
ber and December the rush of emigrants was 
wonderful. Most of them went back to the 
mines. The roads were thronged with persons 
going both ways. The rainy season had com- 
menced. Mud was deep and very sticky. All 
provisions at the mines were being exhausted 
rapidly except fresh beef and mutton. These 
two valuable articles were abundant and cheap. 
Everything else in the provision line went up 
to a dollar a pound; saleratus, eight dollars; 
nails, four dollars; powder, five dollars; shot, 
three dollars; good cowhide or kip boots, 
one hundred dollars a pair; fine French calf 
boots, ten dollars. 

By the middle of December it was almost 
impossible for loaded pack mules to get 
through to the mines. Our last train arrived 
January 2, 1850, having been on the road six 
weeks. January i, I started to find them, 
not having heard of them since they started. 
We had almost concluded that our Mexican 
muleteers had confiscated the valuable cargo. 
All that New Year's Day it rained in tor- 
rents. Near night I found them encamped 
near twenty miles from Murphy's diggings. 
That night I stayed in a tent about fifteen 
by twenty feet in size, kept for general en- 
tertainment. There were some fifteen or 
twenty visitors from neighboring mines, who 
were celebrating the day, singing, dancing, 



24 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and telling yarns, each one of these interest- 
ing acts being followed by drinks all round of 
"hot stuff." By ten o'clock one after an- 
other got too "tired" to participate in the 
festivities, and dropped quietly to the ground; 
but it was midnight before I considered it 
safe for me to lie down by the fire in my wet 
clothes, wrapped in my wet blankets. The 
next morning I started with the train, and 
before dark we were within four miles of our 
camp. The train was obliged to halt for the 
night, but with the two head muleteers I 
pushed on for my comfortable camp fire. 
We could see no trail, it being very dark 
and raining lightly, and soon we were lost 
in the forest; but, knowing that the creek 
was at my left and down the side of the 
mountain, we made for the creek, a mile or 
two distant. We were obliged to ford the 
creek where the water was swift and the bed 
quite rocky. My mule could scarcely keep 
his feet; but, as it was only two rods wide, 
we got through without accident. For a mile 
or two to our camp it was over and around 
rocks and water gullies; but before nine 
o'clock we were under cover, by a good fire, 
and enjoying a wholesome hot supper. 

Our cargo arrived by ten o'clock next day. 
Just before the rainy season commenced we 
built on to the rear of our store a log cabin 
sixteen feet square, which we covered with 
rawhides, lapping them to shed the rain. 
We put up bunks on three sides, with bottoms 
made from the staves of flour barrels, covered 
with pine boughs; and with our blankets we 
thought we had luxurious quarters. We built 
a stone fireplace, laid up in mud, with a bar- 
rel for the top of the chimney. Our logs were 
chinked up with mud, with one small opening 
on the side, with a piece of white cloth to 
keep out the wind and rain. It seemed to be 
just right; but the sun came down very hot. 



the rawhide began to curl, and away went our 
four-dollar nails with snap after snap, until 
half were gone. It began to rain. Then the 
curl came out of the hides, and we stretched 
them to their places again. We built a good 
fire to warm and dry out the place; but, as 
the heat ascended to our pretty roof, there 
were odors developed that we had never 
dreamed of. It was not like rose-water or 
peppermint, and in fact we could not compare 
it to anything else in existence; but we were 
satisfied that it was too pungent for our taste 
and for our health. , We were glad to get 
back into the store, which we had got covered 
in with canvas. We came across some West- 
erners, who cut down a pine-tree, and split out 
"shakes," as they called them, shingles three 
feet long. They covered our cabin with them, 
and made it tight. We paid five hundred 
dollars, and got our money's worth. 

A young vagabond Mexican in a gambling- 
den one night got mad because he lost his 
money at one of the games. He drew a long 
knife, and threatened to use it, but finally 
decided not to do so. The next morning a 
little crowd of respectable people got together 
to decide what should be done with him. 
They thought he ought not to be hung, and 
could not fine him because he had no money, 
and there was no one to hold the money. 
They could not imprison him, as there was 
no prison. The conclusion was to give him 
thirty-nine lashes on his bare back. He was 
tied up to a large tree within twenty feet of 
our cabin, and received the lashes without 
one word of complaint. It was discovered 
that his back bore the marks of having gone 
through a similar experience before. Dr. 
Some one, a nice gentleman from Virginia, 
laid on the lashes. A year or two later these 
two persons met on the highway, both on 
horseback. The Mexican drew his pistol, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



25 



shot the doctor dead. From that hour the 
Mexican took to the highway as general rob- 
ber and murderer. He was Joaquin Muriatta, 
and for three years he was the terror of the 
country. Three-fingered Jack and one or two 
others became his partners. They would ride 
into a mining town; and some of them would 
ride into a store, with pistols drawn, and take 
what they wanted. If no one gave them a 
chance to kill, they felt rather slighted. 
They, would write with chalk on the building, 
"Joaquin,"' and ride off out of sight. It is 
said that in three years they killed over three 
hundred persons, five one morning before 
breakfast. Finally, the governor offered a 
reward of twenty thousand dollars for Joa- 
quin's head. Harry Love, a lawyer, organ- 
, ized a company of twenty men, who went out 
determined to find the gang and bring back 
that precious head. Through a treacherous 
Mexican woman, who had lived with Joaquin, 
his rendezvous was discovered, back in a wild, 
secluded spot in the mountains. The Love 
party arrived in the night, and surrounded the 
cabin. Then, as they were at the front door, 
Joaquin went out the back door, where he 
jumped on to a horse, ready saddled and 
bridled, and started for an escape. In an in- 
stant he was shot dead. One of the Love 
party, named Bill Burns, immediately cut off 
his head. It was afterward preserved in alco- 
hol, and placed on exhibition in San Fran- 
cisco, at twenty-five cents admission. 

Bill Burns was living at Murphy's camp, 
where he was one of our customers in 1849 
and the early part of 1850. I saw him twenty 
years later in Sacramento, where he was an 
inmate of the city hospital, the most used- 
up victim of alcohol that I have ever met. 
He gave me the entire story of Joaquin's ca- 
reer and of his death. He also gave me an 
account of the eleven comrades that came to 



Murphy's camp with him in the fall of 1849. 
They had all died with their boots on except 
himself and a brother, who went to Oregon 
five years before this conversation, and had 
not been heard of since. I have other reasons 
to remember Joaquin. In September, 1849, 
he came into our store, and asked for credit. 
I declined to give it to him. I think it is the 
only case where I ever did so to any one while 
I was there. Joaquin got into a perfect rage. 
That suited me ; for I had taken a great preju- 
dice against him, and wanted him to keep 
away. When he left, he said he would 
call and see me in the night. I told him 
to come. I was always prepared to meet 
fellows like him. I related the case to Dr. 
Brown when he came in from the diggings. 
We looked after our weapons of defence a 
little more carefully than usual, and lay down, 
and had a very good night's rest. The next 
day Joaquin came round, and begged me to 
forgive him, 'called me the best friend he had 
in the world, and would do anything for me. 
He fawned round like a whipped dog, but 
I could plainly see that he had some design 
in all this. In a few days he said he was 
anxious to go to San Francisco, and the next 
time I went he wanted to go with me. I could 
not tell how soon I should go. When I did 
start it was near midnight; and no one knew 
I had gone, except my partner, until some 
time the next day. I dodged him the same 
way two or three times more in the course of 
the season. After he developed into a high- 
wayman I could plainly see that my conclu- 
sions in regard to him had saved me from 
being his first victim. 

In January a Mexican named Robling ar- 
rived at Murphy's camp with a cargo of mer- 
chandise that he had brought from Stockton 
on private speculation. As he did not find 
many customers who wanted to buy for cash 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



(gold was cash at sixteen dollars per ounce) 
except in small lots, we bought him out. He 
was to start back the next day ; and I made an 
arrangement to go along with his train of ten 
muleteers and on one of his mules. About 
noon the train struck out from the regular 
travelled route on to an Indian trail that led 
to our left through the low mountains. I 
protested, and told them in English that it 
was not the road, and insisted that they 
should switch over to the main road. They 
argued loud and long in Spanish that in a 
little while we should reach the main road. 
I was particular not to understand a word they 
said, and they were just as particular not to 
understand one word of English. We kept 
up firing language to each other for a long 
time. I understood all they said, but con- 
vinced them that I did not understand one 
word. I got very suspicious of foul designs 
on me; and I let every man keep ahead of me, 
so I could not get hit in the back. We saw 
no one on the trail except a few Indians, who 
had a little camp by the side of the trail. It 
was near sunset when we got out of the moun- 
tain range, and I could see that wc were get- 
ting near San Joaquin valley. I estimated 
that five miles more would bring us out to the 
main road; and I had high hopes of getting 
there to spend the night at some wayside tent, 
where I could have new company. But to my 
dismay, just as we got to the foot of the moun- 
tain, the train halted; and the pack saddles 
were soon all on the ground for a night's rest. 
I urged Robling to go on with me to the road; 
but my words were of no avail, and, as I had 
no mule of my own, I was obliged to submit 
ti> circumstances. They soon had a good fire, 
where they cooked their tortilla. Each man 
took a pack saddle for a bed, with his feet to 
the fire. I went to a large tree two rods dis- 
tant, where I selected my resting-place, fac- 



ing the fire and my travelling comrades. I 
had no desire or expectation of sleeping. I 
was particular to let them see me carefully 
examine my weapons. Soon we were all 
quiet. I had one eye open and both ears, 
eager to see and hear what was going on. 
Soon there was a lively conference going on 
in whispers. I could catch many words. The 
substance of the whole was that this Yankee 
was loaded with gold, taken out of territory 
that should belong to Mexico. Consequently 
they should have it instead of the bad Yankee. 
Robling did not dispute their arguments, but 
said that Jie was known to have taken me in 
his care, and that he alone would have to bear 
all the responsibility, while the rest of them 
could scatter as they pleased. I had heard 
enough to think it best to break up the confer- 
ence before it went any further. I sat up, and 
in a loud voice gave them a regular Yankee 
blowing up in English for keeping me awake. 
In a minute everybody was very quiet. After 
a time whispering began again, very low, so 
I could distinguish but a few words. Again 
I pitched in, rougher than before. I think I 
said some bad words, just to show them how 
mad I was at their keeping me awake. Sev- 
eral times more before daylight I had to repeat 
my method of keeping them from having a 
conference whereby they could settle upon any 
plan of action to murder and rob me. I felt 
under obligation to Robling for his objecting 
to their plans; but he was sharp enough to 
realize that, if I was killed and robbed, the 
next thing to happen would be to serve him in 
the same way. His hundred mules and the 
gold he got for his cargo would have enabled 
these scoundrels to divide up a nice boodle. 
By ten o'clock in the morning we were on our 
main road, where we got refreshments, and 
where people were always in sight, wallowing 
through the mud, either pushing on to the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



27 



gold diggings or working their way back. 
On our arrival in Stockton these precious 
muleteers wanted me to eat and drink with 
them, and professed ever so much friendship 
for me. I shook them off politely, but 
quickly ; and I think they were much disap- 
pointed when they found they could not have 
just one more night with me. In February, 
1850, the rains let up enough to favor mining 
work. At Murphy's camp there were near 
five hundred miners. Business was lively. 
Several persons went to Stockton to buy 
goods, to start trading business. We learned 
that numerous mule trains were on the way to 
our neighborhood, loaded with goods to be 
sold by the muleteers. It was evident to us 
that the business was to be overdone. In a 
few weeks we should expect better roads and 
very much cheaper freight ; and we decided to. 
stand from under as quick as possible. We 
sold at a discount from regular prices all we 
could in larger lots. A stranger, a Mr. Will- 
iams, came in one day, anxious to start busi- 
ness. We gave him a price for the entire 
property. It took only an hour or two to 
close the trade. Then we were ready to leave 
for home as soon as we could call in gold 
for some debts outstanding. 

One day I started on foot up the mountain 
to see one of our customers three miles off. 
I had gone two miles on an Indian trail when 
I came face to face with a California lion, six 
rods off. We looked savage at each other; 
but I did not want to hurt him, and I hap- 
pened to think I had business in camp that re- 
quired my attention, of much more importance 
than collecting debts or killing lions. So I 
whirled about, and went back. I kept one eye 
on the lion, who also kept an eye on me, as 
he moved slowly up the side of the mountain. 
I have always thought we showed discretion in 
parting company, otherwise one of us might 



have been hurt. Lions, cougars, wild-cats, 
and coyotes were always howling round our 
camp every night, but seldom seen by day- 
light. In a few days after we sold out we 
came to the conclusion that Williams was a 
sharp gambler. He tried his best to interest 
me in poker, whereby he expected to win back 
the bag of gold we received from him. A 
few weeks after we left I am told that he went 
to a Mexican tent one night to play cards. 
He won their money by cheating. One of 
the Mexicans put a knife through him. Next 
day three of the party were hung. 

Near the isth of February we quit the camp 
with a mule train bound for Stockton. We 
forded the three branches of the Calaveras 
River. The middle branch was deep and 
swift, about six rods wide ; and in many places 
there were trees overhanging the banks. We 
had to enter the river ten rods above a safe 
landing on the other side, as the current swept 
the mules down stream as they swam across; 
and below this safe landing were overhanging 
trees and steep banks. All got over safe 
before Dr. Brown would venture the trial. 
From some cause his mule did not reach the 
landing, but was close to the shore. The doc- 
tor took in the situation, and caught hold of 
the first branch of a tree that he could reach. 
He hung hard to that until we hauled him 
ashore. The mule was got ashore further 
down the stream. It was a very narrow es- 
cape from death for Dr. Brown. At Stockton 
we found a small passenger steamer, that took 
us to San Francisco in ten hours for thirty 
dollars each. The full capacity of the 
steamer was twenty passengers, ten on each 
side. When a passenger passed across the 
deck, some other must cross over to take his 
place, to trim ship. 

The harbor of San Francisco seemed to be 
full of ships. It looked as if all the ships in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the world had arrived there. A good river 
steamer had arrived, and was making regular 
trips to Sacramento City. Buildings and 
building materials had arrived in great quan- 
tities, and were rapidly being utilized. The 
crowd of people, the bustle of business, the 
excitement, the reckless gambling, the free 
and easy ways of everybody, made the town as 
lively as a circus. No one had ever seen any- 
thing like it, or ever will again. Money was 
plenty. Everybody had some of it, and no 
one seemed to care whether school kept or 
not. I was made glad many times each 
day by meeting old friends that I supposed 
were in their quiet homes at the East. Every 
steamer or sailing-ship that arrived in port, 
from every part of the world, was crowded to 
its utmost capacity. California tickets for 
the steamers in New York were sold six 
months in advance, and anything that could 
be got for early sailing sold for hundreds of 
dollar's premium. Even one thousand dollars 
was sometimes paid for quick passage as pre- 
mium. Dr. Brown and myself paid five hun- 
dred dollars each for steamer passage home. 
We had been from home fourteen months. 
During that time we had not seen milk, eggs, 
or a bed. Neither of us had spoken to a 
white woman, or seen any of the comforts of 
a civilized home. I now think I must have 
been homesick ; but, when we sailed for home, 
I had in mind that in three months I should 
be back in California. 

April I, 1850, we were on a steamship 
bound for home by way of Panama. The 
luxury of a clean bunk, with pillows and 
sheets, clean towels, napkins, and table- 
cloths, good tableware, and a tolerably good 
bill of fare, was highly appreciated. Our 
steamer touched at Monterey, San Diego, San 
Bias, and Acapulco. At the two last-named 
places we got plenty of tropical fruits, deli- 



cious chocolate, chickens, eggs, etc. The 
reader can well imagine that we enjoyed our 
trip on the Pacific beyond any ability I have 
to express it. In a little more than two weeks 
we were inside the beautiful Bay of Panama, 
ninety miles in length and from ten to thirty 
miles wide, dotted with perhaps a hundred 
islands, all of which seemed to be cultivated 
to the top with pineapples, bananas, tama- 
rinds, limes, oranges, cocoanuts, and many 
other tropical fruits, all of which flourish 
there to perfection. Our steamer anchored at 
Tobago Island (twelve miles from Panama). 
All the passengers were at once put ashore 
by the use of the native dugouts, most of them 
from thirty to sixty feet long. 

The steamship company furnished us with 
mules to take us to Gorgona with one hundred 
pounds baggage. We spent one night at 
Panama at the American Hotel. During the 
evening some of our passengers and others 
were in a drinking-saloon a few doors from the 
hotel, where there was some trouble. Knives 
were used, also several pistols. At first I 
went to the place to see what was going on ; 
but, as I heard several balls whiz by my head, 
I concluded to withdraw to the hotel. It was 
said that a few people were killed and others 
wounded. As we were off for Gorgona early 
the next morning, we never knew the particu- 
lars of the result of that scrimmage; but we 
did know that several of our passengers failed 
to go over the Isthmus with us, and we could 
only guess why they did not do so. Probably 
somebody's mother, wife, or sister is still 
wondering why that absent one never returned 
home. Dr. Brown and myself kept together 
with the muleteer who had our luggage in 
charge. 

When near the place where we partook of 
monkey and parrot stew on our former trip 
across the Isthmus, we met the man Robinson, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



29 



who was dressed in white linen, on a fine 
high-headed horse, decked with saddle and 
bridle elaborately trimmed with silver. Rob- 
inson spoke good English, was tall, with a prom- 
inent scar on one cheek that might have been 
made with a sword or some other ugly weapon. 
Five minutes before we met him he met 
Hiram Grimes, who was considered quite rich, 
and who was just ahead of us with a relative, 
both of Boston. Robinson halted them, and 
drew a big knife. Grimes, who seldom ever 
spoke except in a joking way, said, " Hello, 
here comes a man to stick a fork in me," and 
inquired of Robinson what he wanted. An- 
swer came, "Your gold." "Is that all?" said 
Grimes, while he ran his hand into his pocket, 
and brought out a handful of bright golden 
coin, some four hundred dollars, and trans- 
ferred it to Robinson. "Good-by," and all 
was done in two minutes. We arrived at Gor- 
gona a few minutes behind Grimes, who was 
anxious to know how we got along. We knew 
nothing of the robbery until we got it from 
Grimes. This man Robinson for a year or two 
after that time was known to lead the life of 
a highwayman, and it was supposed that he 
had the protection of some government offi- 
cials. He so much interfered with Isthmus 
travel that they were obliged to arrest and 
hang him. I well remember meeting him on 
my first trip over the Isthmus. He came up 
to me at a lively gait when I had got five 
minutes behind my companions. He inquired 
if there were other parties behind me. I told 
him, "Yes, twenty men." "Are they armed 
or unarmed, like me?" "Yes, all armed like 
me," showing my pistols. He went on. 

At Gorgona we found the town greatly im- 
proved in a year. California emigrants were 
all leaving a little money there. The railroad 
route had been surveyed, and the natives with 
many We?t India negroes were at work in con- 



structing it. Very few people, even the na- 
tives, can work in that climate without getting 
sick; and they were dying off rapidly. In a 
few hours, perhaps six, we went down the 
Chagres River to the ocean. The boatmen 
had nothing to do but to guide the craft in the 
right channel, and we were delighted with 
our trip. We were especially happy to think 
that we had got back to the Atlantic side of 
the continent. 

At. Chagres we at once went on board the 
new steamship "Georgia," about five thousand 
tons register. At that time I think that was 
the largest steamship afloat. We went to 
Havana, Cuba, in about three days. We put 
off passengers bound for New Orleans, and 
were to wait at Havana until a New Or- 
leans steamer arrived with passengers for New 
York. We waited three days until they ar- 
rived. That three days I remember as among 
the pleasant days of my life. We had just 
about time enough to visit everything in the 
city and outside of the walls for a distance of 
five miles. The memory of those days is 
like a pleasant dream. We sailed for New 
York in the afternoon. At supper time we 
were not hungry, next morning the same. 
Dr. Brown then said we both had yellow 
fever. We at once engaged the colored stew- 
ard who cared for our room to give us first- 
class attention, but to keep his mouth shut 
about our being sick. In four days we w-ere 
off quarantine. New York, and the health officer 
came on board the ship, giving inspection of the 
rooms, and making out a clean record of health 
for everybody on the ship. We had dressed, 
and got out of our room, and were not noticed 
among the passengers. At the dock in New 
York City our colored man got a hack, and 
with our luggage took us to the Fall River 
steamer, got our tickets, state-room, baggage, 
and checks, then took us one at a time to our 



30 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



state-room, and helped us into our berths. 
It was several hours before the steamboat left, 
but no one disturbed us until morning. When 
we arrived at Fall River, where my wife was 
staying with her mother, I at once went in a 
hack to her residence. It was before any one 
was up in the house. I was soon put to bed, 
and put under the doctor's charge. For 
about a week I was as crazy as a loon, when I 
began to improve; but it was about a month 
before I got out much. After that for sev- 
eral months I had frequent attacks that laid me 
up for some days at a time, and I think it 
was full six months before I entirely recovered 
from my Havana attack. Dr. Brown arrived 
home in Manchester, N.H., in four hours 
after I arrived in Fall River. I think he re- 
covered from his fever earlier than I did. I 
now think that it was a fortunate circumstance 
that brought us together as friends and busi- 
ness partners. We never differed in any way, 
and I can say I always found him a Christian 
gentleman. 

Dr. Brown and myself, I think, were the 
first two men that ever arrived in California 
from New Hampshire and the first two men 
that ever arrived in New Hampshire from 
there. We found everybody half-crazy about 
the gold in California. Many letters came in- 
quiring all about the country; and several per- 
sons came over a hundred miles, seeking 
information. I told them all alike, unless 
they had surplus money, and were willing to 
work like slaves and endure hardships, they 
had better keep away from the gold diggings. 

For four years, from 1850 to 1854, I re- 
mained in Manchester, where I built a fine 
residence. Thinking I could see a great 
future for Manchester, I bought several tracts 
of farming lands, laid out and graded streets, 
set some hundreds of shade trees, and cut the 
lands up into house lots for sale. All of 



these lands have steadily increased in value. 
Many fine residences are now built upon them, 
and would at this time sell for as much money 
as would satisfy the wants of almost any one. 
But time is short, and waiting for advances 
in real estate was too slow to suit me. I 
liked Manchester and its people, and so long 
as I live shall hold in sacred memory the 
friends there that made me think this world 
was such a pleasant place to live in. It was 
at St. Michael's Church (now St. Paul's) 
that I was baptized and confirmed. Now I 
can think of but three persons who are alive 
that were members of that church when I was 
received. 

In the spring of 1854 I sold out my entire 
possessions at Manchester, and removed to 
California, leaving my wife with our little 
daughter Minnie again with her mother at 
Fall River. Steamships were plenty at that 
time; and it was without any difificulty that I 
got passage for San Francisco via "City of 
Kingston," "Jamaica," and "Nicaragua." 
Very fortunately for me, I was assigned to a 
very nice state-room with Colonel Mansfield, 
Inspector-general of the United States Army. 
He had distinguished himself along with 
General Taylor in all of his battles in Mex- 
ico. Afterward he was killed at the battle of 
Antietam, fighting for the old flag. Persons 
who have seen the cyclorama of the battle of 
the "Merrimac" and the "Monitor" will re- 
member his lifelike tall figure, with his white 
hair and beard, sitting on a large gray horse 
on the shore at Newport News. This most 
prominent and lifelike figure first strikes the 
visitor's view. He was a noble specimen of 
a high-bred American gentleman. His offi- 
cial position gave him every comfort and 
privilege that were on the ship, in which he 
seemed to think I was equal with him. I 
liked that. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



31 



We spent a day at Jamaica taking on coal, 
all of which was carried on board and dumped 
down the hole from black women's heads. 
They all went up one gangway and down the 
other at a regular marching pace, never miss- 
ing step even when diimping coal, all sing- 
ing some freedom song, every verse ending 
with "This is the jubilee." (This was nearly 
twenty years after they were made free by 
Great Britain.) They received ten cents an 
hour and occasionally a slap on the bare back 
by the men drivers employed to keep them 
up close in the procession. They were a jolly 
set. Colonel Mansfield took me with him to 
call on United States Consul Harrison, cousin 
of the first President Harrison. He was ap- 
pointed to the position he held by General 
Washington, and at that time was the oldest 
appointee in the service of the government. 
Our call lasted at least three hours. We 
were served with an elaborate lunch, and left 
the venerable old gentleman and his wife with 
feelings of high reagrd. 

We took a drive all over the city and the 
suburbs. We could not form a very favorable 
impression of the effect of negro emancipation 
upon the welfare of the island. Hundreds of 
fine mansions were tumbling to ruin. Planta- 
tions and gardens, all of which had an elabo- 
rate and expensive system of irrigation, were 
growing up to weeds and brush. No one at 
work, no enterprise, no money. But the freed- 
men were lying round in the sun, pictures 
of perfect contentment. We next anchored 
some two miles off from Greytown, opposite 
the mouth of the river San Juan del Norte. 
We were taken to shore in good-sized boats 
over a very rough sea. There we took a small 
steamboat to Castillo Rapids. I think we 
made the trip in one day, over the proposed 
route of the great ship canal. We had a de- 
lightful day of it. The river in some places 



was less than half a mile wide. At other 
places, and, in fact, most of the way, it 
seemed to be from five to ten miles wide. It 
was like a lake, all dotted with innumerable 
islands, covered with beautiful tropical 
growth. It did not seem like an uninhabited 
jungle, but more like pleasure grounds of a 
big estate. 

At the head of Castillo Rapids we took a 
good-sized, well-arranged steamer, including 
sleeping-berths. The next morning we had 
crossed the fine lake to Virgin Bay. The 
steamship company provided us at this place 
with saddle mules, to take us to San Juan 
del Sud, some twelve miles distant, situated 
on a small, nice little harbor, the western ter- 
minus of the proposed ship canal. I thought 
I would like a nice ride down to the Pacific. 
So I gave the muleteer five dollars to bring 
the nicest mule he had to take ijne there. I 
got him. He was a mouse color, and his back 
was as smooth as a mouse. I felt quite proud 
as I trotted out of town, probably sixty rods. 
It was a good smooth road, and everything was 
lovely. All of a sudden my pretty mule made 
a break for the thick chaparral. It looked 
close enough to prevent a rabbit from entering 
it. I hung to the mule the best I could, but 
soon found myself sprawling in the tangled 
wilds of the chaparral; and the mule went on. 
I pulled myself together the best I could, but 
I failed entirely to treat my clothes in that 
way. I was scratched and bleeding, but not 
seriously hurt. I worked my way back to the 
corral, and got a tough-looking jDld mule, that 
took me through on time. 

Our hotel was a greasy, dirty place, located 
in the sand, near the beach. At this place 
there are lots of "land crabs," as large as a 
man's hand. They go all over and through 
the house as readily as a rat, and are a great 
annoyance. I could not sleep. We had 



32 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tickets for the steamer " Brother Jonathan" for 
San Francisco. She was capable of carrying 
near two thousand passengers comfortably. 
We found that she had been disabled on her 
last up trip; and the steamship company had 
nothing to use as a substitute except the small 
steamship "Pacific," fitted to carry about four 
hundred passengers. A few days ahead of us 
a steamer from New Orleans had arrived at 
Nicaragua with many passengers, also bound 
for San Francisco, making all told full two 
thousand passengers. The steamer's officers 
gave out notice that no passengers could be 
taken on board until all the women and chil- 
dren were taken and their escorts. Well, I 
went out to the steamer with Colonel Mans- 
field, and we were received without any ques- 
tions being' asked. At the purser's office we 
found the best state-room on the ship was reg- 
istered for us, and were handed the key to the 
room. When we sailed there were seven- 
teen hundred men, women, and children 
on board. What was to be done with them 
no one could imagine. At night they were 
all over the floors, on and under the tables, and 
anywhere where they could find a place to He 
down. After a day or two out, small-pox 
broke out in the steerage among the New Or- 
leans passengers. During the voyage forty 
died, and were buried in the sea, mostly in 
the night. Strange to say, no case occurred 
in any other part of the ship or to anybody 
after we landed. The providing of food for so 
many people on that little steamship is a mat- 
ter that I cannot understand. All I know is 
that there was one little table, where three 
times a day there was an abundance of 
luxuries and delicacies, to say nothing of the 
substantial, and generally some little extras 
were sent to our state-room twice a day. We 
were near two weeks making our trip from 
Nicaragua to San Francisco. That was forty 



years ago; but Colonel' Mansfield's face, 
voice, and conversation are fresh in memory as 
if it were yesterday. For the three years that 
his duties kept him on the Pacific Coast he 
always called to see me when he came to San 
Francisco; and he took especial pains to 
bring round his army friends to introduce me 
to them. In that way I made the acquaint- 
ance of many army officers. He always 
showed true friendship for me, and I am proud 
to say he was one of the most esteemed 
friends I ever had. 

San Francisco in 1854 had become a large 
city. Many miles of streets had been built 
up, with comfortable living and business 
quarters for the entire population, no two 
buildings alike. Most of them were what 
would now be called shanties. They had al- 
most all been built before any street grades 
had been established. In 1854 the streets 
were in process of grading. Many buildings 
were down in a hole. Others were perched 
high in the air. There was a good deal of 
getting up and down stairs, but business of 
all kinds was booming. A picture of the city 
as it was at that time would now be a curios- 
ity. Hundreds of new, substantial buildings, 
with some claim to good architecture, were 
being constructed; but rents were very high. 
A four-story building was going up on the 
corner of Commercial and Sansom Streets, 
about thirty by sixty feet. William Sherman 
and myself, having formed a business copart- 
nership, leased the lower floor and basement at 
nine hundred and twenty-five dollars per month, 
eleven thousand one hundred dollars per year. 
It was a big rent, perhaps the largest in the city ; 
but we thought it was worth that to us. It 
was located near all the principal hotels and 
theatres; and everybody coming into the city 
had to face our big signs, sixty feet long, 
"S. L. Wilson & Co.," "San Francisco Cloth- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



33, 



ing Store." We found the location right for 
our business. After the first year we got our 
rent reduced nearly one-third. We bought 
odd invoices of clothing that were shipped 
from New York, Paris, and London, always 
buying the best we could get. The better the 
goods the quicker they sold and the larger the 
profit. We arranged with James Wilde, Jr., 
& Co., of New York, a leading manufacturer, 
to send us by express by every steamer the 
newest and choicest clothing to be made up, 
strictly custom work. We also sent on to 
them the measure of many of our customers 
for special goods and make. We never got 
any goods that were too costly to sell or to 
be satisfactory to the buyer. Our business 
brought me in contact with most of the lead- 
ing men of the State, all the way from Sam 
Brannan to Governor Stanford. 

My partner, Mr. William Sherman, had 
never had anything to do with mercantile 
business, but was employed by his brother, 
Richard M. Sherman, to look after a valuable 
property owned by him on Montgomery Street, 
San Francisco. The buying for our firm, and 
getting orders off for New York to keep up 
our stock, and looking after our sales, all de- 
volved on me. Mr. Sherman acted as book- 
keeper, and attended to the financial part of 
our business. Mr. Sherman was one of the 
leading men in establishing the public school 
system in San Francisco. He held the posi- 
tion of Chairman of the Board of Education 
for many years. He was also for several years 
Chairman of the State Committee of the Re- 
publican party, and during General Grant's 
administration as President he held the office 
of United States Sub-treasurer under a bond 
for near twenty millions of dollars. His long 
connection with public affairs gave him an 
intimate acquaintance with a large number of 
the prominent men in the State, who natu- 



rally came to his place of business to talk 
politics, public business, and social affairs 
as well as the fashions of clothes. 

While in that business I sold the outfit 
for General Walker's men on their way to 
Lower California on a filibustering expedition, 
whence they just escaped with their lives 
by the arrival at Ensenada of a United States 
government ship, on which our worthy citizen, 
Starr Kinny, was employed. Soon Walker 
went to Nicaragua to revolutionize that coun- 
try, and lost his head in short order. San 
Francisco for a long time has had the reputa- 
tion of having the best-dressed population 
on earth. It is a satisfaction to me to think 
I contributed my full share to bring about that, 
condition. 

In the summer of 1856 my family came out 
to California with some of my friends. We 
commenced housekeeping at once, with the 
idea that this was to be our home for several 
years. A year and a half later our daughter, 
then near five years old, was taken down sick 
with diphtheria. Three days later she died. 
Her remains were taken to Manchester, and 
buried by the side of her little brother and 
sister. This death was a circumstance that we 
had never taken into account in all our plans 
for the future. It was the greatest grief that 
we had ever experienced. My wife, naturally 
consumptive, broke down entirely. I changed 
residence often, looking for better air, more 
cheerful company, or anything that would im- 
prove her health. A sea voyage home to her 
mother was thought to be the only thing left 
for us to do. We tried that, with but little 
change. After we had lived there two months 
it was decided that I should go to San Fran- 
cisco, and either sell out my business or ar- 
range for a residence East, and attend to the 
shipment of goods for our business. I had 
been back in San Francisco just two weeks 



34 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



when another steamer arrived, bringing the in- 
telligence that my wife died quietly ten days 
after I sailed, and that she was buried with all 
our three children. My troubles almost un- 
fitted me for business. In a month or two I 
sold out my entire interest in the firm of 
S. L. Wilson & Co. ; and I was prepared for 
some new venture, as much as possible away 
from all old scenes and associations, where 
I had enjoyed so many pleasurable hours. 

About this time some Mexicans were roam- 
ing about in what is now Nevada, looking for 
mines. They came across an old man named 
Comstock, digging out fine silver ore, not 
knowing what it was. The Mexicans knew 
at sight that he had a valuable mine, and 
they at once decided to give about all they 
possessed to obtain it. Their possessions 
consisted of an old gray mare and a little 
grub. Comstock arrived at the locality on 
foot, and rode away on horseback, thinking 
he had got the best of the trade. That was 
the great Comstock vein at Virginia City, 
where so many millions of dollars have been 
taken out, and where Mackay, Fair, Flood, 
and O'Brien gained their millions. The 
story of the discovery was soon known at San 
Francisco, where a rawhide sack of the ore 
had been exhibited. Locations of mining 
claims were soon made that covered the vein 
for several miles in length, and about every- 
thing that has ever proved valuable in that 
vicinity was covered by those locations. 
Thousands of people wanted to go there; but 
the Sierra Nevada Mountains stood in the 
way, with very deep snows and no roads, only 
the old emigrant trail, which in the summer 
was very difficult to travel with any kind of a 
team. But I decided to go, as some others 
had done. 

It was in February, i860, that I went over 
the mountain by way of Placerville and Straw- 



berry Valley to Carson City and Virginia 
City, some of the way on horseback, but much 
of it on foot. In some places it was very 
deep mud, in others very deep snow, with 
occasionally a tolerable trail over the rocks. 
I think I was four days going from Placer- 
ville (the foot of the mountain on the Cali- 
fornia side) to Virginia City. There were 
about twenty men in the gang I travelled 
with and about as many horses ; and we had 
rather of a jolly time — cabins to sleep in 
nights with big log fires and plenty to eat 
and drink, hot or cold. I think there were 
near three hundred people at Virginia City 
and vicinity when I arrived. There were 
perhaps a half a dozen comfortable little 
cabins built of stone and mud. The other 
quarters were almost all cloth tents. They 
have a horrible climate. The winter months 
are quite cold, it frequently freezing hard, with 
very high winds and sometimes several feet of 
snow, and very little firewood to be obtained 
within twenty miles. I was lucky enough to 
get a bunk to sleep in at the "Hotel de Hay- 
stack," a board shanty, twelve by twenty 
feet, with small lean-to for kitchen, kept by 
Nettleton, where some three hundred meals 
were served in course of every twenty-four 
hours. All provisions and general supplies 
had to be transported over the mountains dur- 
ing that winter on mules' backs, which made 
everything costly. Gambling-dens were flour- 
ishing. Numerous well-known murderers and 
outlaws made themselves conspicuous on the 
streets. We were in Utah, four hundred 
miles from Salt Lake City; and there were 
no courts or any recognized laws any nearer 
than Salt Lake. It was a pretty tough place. 
Almost everybody there was after silver mines. 
I soon became interested in claims that were 
located, also in several prospecting com- 
panies. Everybody was busy at something. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



35 



I bought house lots that had been located in 
the business centre; and I located lots on the 
outer circle, for all of which I found cus- 
tomers. As the warmer weather came on in 
March and April, there was large emigration 
to Nevada, made up of all classes of people, 
but especially of bright, brainy young men. 
It was about as lively as Wall Street, New 
York. A miners' stock exchange was formed 
in San Francisco, and another at Virginia 
City. I was a member of both, and bought 
and sold according to my judgment. Large 
sums of money changed hands in these ex- 
changes daily. Fortunes were made and lost, 
both in San Francisco and Virginia City. 
There were very few people who did not have 
some interest in some of these Nevada silver 
mine locations. Even women and children 
had certificates showing that they were in sil- 
ver mining business. They put in their 
money for development, but rarely ever got it 
back. 

In May, i860, the Piute Indians were mis- 
treated by some vagabond whites. All at 
once they disappeared from the white settle- 
ments, and every day or two we heard of mas- 
sacres of travellers in various sections. It was 
decided that a hundred men well armed should 
go out on horseback, clean out the tribe, and 
teach them to behave themselves. Major 
Ormsby, of Carson City, was chosen to lead 
the forces. Just one hundred men were en- 
rolled. With them there were five to twelve 
camp followers. They went off full of fight 
and fun. The second or third day out they 
reached Pyramid Lake, where they followed 
the Indian trail up the side of a high rough 
hill. While in a narrow ravine they were 
suddenly surrounded by two thousand Indians, 
commanded by Chief Winnamucca and Son 
Bill, who were on horseback and well armed 
with rifles and other murderous weapons. 



The result was, only three whites escaped with 
their lives. One of these, McCloughlen, 
came to the " Hotel de Haystack" three days 
after the fight. He had a rifle ball near his 
backbone, that had struck a rib on his side, 
and followed the rib back to where we cut it 
out with a penknife, just a little beneath the 
skin. A green-looking, beardless boy from 
Missouri in his retreat from the rear of the 
fight on horseback had overtaken McClough- 
len on foot. An appeal was made to him by 
McCloughlen to help save his life. The 
lad abandoned his horse, and with McClough- 
len made his way into a thicket, where the 
Indians were riding by them for hours. In 
the night this lad crawled up to the Indian 
camp, untied the lariat that held a horse, 
and carefully crawled back to McCloughlen, 
helped him mount, and led that horse back to 
Virginia City. That was an act of bravery 
and generous manhood seldom equalled. He 
is one of the unrecorded heroes. I am sorry 
that I cannot recall his name. The next day 
almost everybody had business that called him 
back to California immediately; and away 
they went on horses and mules and on foot, 
any way to get over the mountains. They 
took with them their firearms. 

After the stampede we looked over the situ- 
ation, and found there were about three hun- 
dred of us left there who had walked over the 
mountain to get to Nevada, and did not like 
the idea of going back on the run. Near 
three thousand persons went over the moun- 
tain within three days. We found about 
thirty or forty old guns and pistols in our 
crowd and ammunition enough to last an 
hour or two. We sent an appeal over to the 
governor of California to send us help. In 
about ten days he sent over Jack Hays, the 
Texan Indian fighter, with about two hundred 
picked men. Those ten days were trouble- 



36 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



some times. Several Indian squaws who were 
employed at Virginia City as servants claimed 
to have secret information. Every day "the 
Indians were to appear to us that night." 
Of course everybody had to prepare for de- 
fence. Some had crowbars, pickaxes, etc. 
I had a big cheese knife. Signal fires were 
burning from every mountain top, and to all 
appearances we had got to fight. Pickets 
were out night and day. There was a stone 
building partly built up one story, which we 
converted into a fort for the protection of 
the women and children, where they were all 
gathered in every night. Among them was 
Alonzo Pixley's family, now of New Milford. 
No person in Virginia City thought of sleep- 
ing any one of those ten nights. All the 
sleep any one had was in the daytime. Jack 
Hays with some three hundred men went out, 
and gave the Indians a fight. He killed fifty 
Indians, and then asked them for a confer- 
ence. They agreed to call it square and go 
home to their usual peaceful lives. We were 
then ready to sleep and pursue our usual busi- 
ness; but no Indian came near Virginia City, 
and no white man ventured near the Indians. 
A few weeks before the Indian outbreak 
Professor John Veatch and his son Andrew, 
both of whom were experts as mining men 
and mineralogists, came in from a prospecting 
tour, bringing samples of fine silver ore from 
claims they had located, in what they called the 
Clan Alpine mining district. They described 
it as being at the headquarters of the Piute Ind- 
ian home. They showed me a map of the 
route to the locality. I wanted an interest in 
the property. They proposed to me that, if I 
would go there and protect their interest in 
one of their locations, they would surrender to 
me all rights to all other property. I ac- 
cepted at once. A Mr. Norton agreed to join 
me in the enterprise. I bought a team of 



four good horses and a regular emigrant 
wagon, selected four men that I well knew, 
put on a good supply of provisions, tools, etc. 
After the team was ready to start, Mr. Norton 
backed out. As my men were not of that 
kind, we put out on our one-hundred-and- 
thirty-mile trip across the desert for Clan 
Alpine. As I look at it now, it was the most 
reckless thing I ever did in my life. We 
passed on to "Rag Town," between the sink 
of the Humboldt and the sink of the Corsan 
Rivers. The first, after running its course for 
five hundred miles, and the latter, after one 
hundred and fifty miles, disappear in the earth. 
The location of Rag Town is where all the 
emigrant teams that cross the Humboldt sink 
first found fresh water after a sixty-mile drive. 
Of course, they took a good rest at this place; 
and the women washed up their clothes, and 
hung them on the bushes to dry. In that way, 
very appropriately, it got named "Rag Town." 
Many a wagon has been abandoned on that 
desert, and many cattle and horses have lain 
down and died. Asa Kenyon kept a "dead 
fall" there (Rag Town). It is said that he 
used to go out on to the desert ten or fifteen 
miles, and sell fresh water at a dollar a gallon. 
He had a very bad reputation, especially as a 
liar. He was told once that he had the repu- 
tation of being the greatest liar in the Terri- 
tory. His only reply was, "I guess they do 
not know Honey Lake Smith." 

We -passed mountain wells and Fort Church- 
ill (where there were four or five soldiers). 
There we saw on our left the mountain range 
where we were to find Clan Alpine. We 
had come over one hundred miles, and seen 
no one on the road, no sign of Indians, 
except that every night their signal fires were 
burning. We did not sleep very well nights; 
and we had plenty of time to think over 
what the chances might be of an unwelcome 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



37 



reception by Chief Winnamucca and Bill, 
who was -the active man in all the tribe, 
his father having got so old that he wanted 
rest._ At 4 p.m. we arrived at the foot of 
the canon that led up to the Indian encamp- 
ment — or town, more properly speaking — 
two miles distant. We drove our team right 
up in front of a huge shelving rock, which 
looked like a good shelter for ourselves, and 
left the wagon close up in front, to serve as a 
breastwork in case of trouble. As soon as we 
got located, I got on to one of our horses, and 
rode up the canon to find Bill. I had got 
almost up to the village when I met three 
Indians, the first I had seen since our little 
war. I inquired for Bill. They pointed the 
direction of his house, one-fourth of a mile 
away. I passed many houses and Indians ; 
and, when stopped by any of them, I asked the 
same question, and got the same answer. 
When I found him, I told my business in his 
territory, and asked him to come down in the 
morning and get our horses, and take care of 
them until I wanted them, as I was afraid 
some one^ would steal them. "All right." 
"Come early in the morning," I said, as I 
wanted him to "be there to breakfast." "All 
right." I, for the first time since 1 left Vir- 
ginia City, began to feel quite comfortable. 
On my way back I took a look at the situa- 
tion. It was a gem of a little valley, a mile 
wide and several miles in length, with moun- 
tains surrounding it, with only that canon I 
travelled as an outlet. A beautiful brook 
wound about the valley and out of the canon. 
There was a beautiful growth of trees of nu- 
merous kinds, giving the whole valley a pgrk- 
like appearance. I can say truly I never 
saw a more beautiful spot for a quiet village. 
Soon I was back to camp. The pot was boil- 
ing, and we were in good spirits. In ten min- 
utes we heard a commotion up the canon; and 



there appeared a dozen Indians on horseback, 
coming for our camp as though the Old Nick 
was after them. My hair began to rise, and 
I began to ask myself how it would feel to 
have my scalp taken off. Our weapons were 
in order, and I thought we should have a fair 
chance to get the best of that number of 
Indians, anyway. As they got near us, I 
could see they did not mean fight. They 
greeted us as friends, and we received them 
the same. Bill said he thought he would 
rather come for the horses that night, and 
rather have his breakfast that night than 
wait until morning for it. I think by the 
way they enjoyed their food they had been 
waiting at least a month for breakfast. 

They had undoubtedly exhausted all their 
store of food (pine nuts and grass seed) during 
their war with the whites; and with food I 
furnished them and fair treatment I made 
them my fast friends, and for the four years 
I stayed there off and on I was treated with 
the greatest kindness and consideration. We 
located our abode near the brook, at the mouth 
of that beautiful canon. I could see that, if 
any settlement was ever required there by the 
development of mines, it must be at the 
mouth of that canon, as there was the only 
place where wholesome water could be ob- 
tained for many miles. I made a government 
location of one hundred and sixty acres, and 
bought of the Indians any rights they might 
have to it. I got a deed signed by Chief 
Winnamucca, his two sons, Buffalo Bill (no 
connection of the show man), Buffalo Joe, 
and Natchez. I bought out Professor 
Veatch's reserved claim for twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars. I paid the Indians four hundred 
dollars in gold, and about as much more in 
provisions. That made me monarch of the 
Clan Alpine property. I built a good cabin 
of stone and mud, which was also well 



38 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



adapted for use as a fort. We were comforta- 
ble and the Indians rich. I was obliged to 
go often to Virginia City and San Francisco 
for supplies and to look after my mining 
interests. 

In 1 86 1 I spent considerable time in the 
Humboldt mountains, east of the sink of the 
Humboldt, prospecting for silver and looking 
over the claims being worked there. There 
were many mines rich in silver; but the veins 
were small, and the ore was so impregnated 
with copper, lead, bismuth, arsenic, and other 
substances that it was too rebellious to be re- 
duced at a profit. During that summer I 
crossed the desert from Humboldt City to Rag 
Town several times; but it was in the night, 
with fresh horses, and with a supply of water 
and feed, and I did not suffer, though this is 
the place where overland emigrants suffered 
the most. Until the summer of 1864 I spent 
much of my time vibrating between San Fran- 
cisco and Virginia City, or that place and Clan 
Alpine. The roads over the Sierra Nevada 
Mountains had been nicely graded. Wells & 
Fargo's express and stage line, the overland 
stage and pony express to the Missouri River, 
the telegraph from Virginia City to San 
Francisco, were all working well. Good 
hotels and four churches and a theatre were 
built in Virginia City. Some mines were 
producing largely, and the excitement in re- 
gard to them and other mines anticipated was 
much like a craze. 

The trip over the mountains on the fine Con- 
cord coaches, with fine horses changed every 
eight miles, with Hank Monk or Watson to 
drive, was a pleasure that all could appreciate. 
The trip was always made in the night, when 
all teams were laid up. In the daytime there 
was a constant procession of teams, some of 
them with from twelve to twenty mules, draw- 
ing one immense wagon with from two to six 



smaller ones ("back actions"). In the course 
of four years I crossed the mountains nearly 
one hundred times. I always endeavored to 
get an outside seat, and I always enjoyed the 
scenery and the excitement beyond anything 
I can write. In September, 1864, I had 
taken Buffalo Bill to Virginia City, and intro- 
duced him and his colored friends to the back 
door of white society again, where they had 
been strangers for four years. I took steamer 
to New York via Panama. I returned the 
next spring to California and Nevada. I 
dropped most of my mining interests into the 
hands of persons who were anxious to show 
how much better they could do with them 
than I could. 

In August, 1865, I returned to New York, 
where I took a nice office on Broadway, put 
my name on the door, and was ready for any- 
thing that turned up. I made several little 
turns in business that were satisfactory. I 
had been knocking about the world so much I 
began to think it was time for me to establish 
a home. In New York I became acquainted 
with Mrs. Alzora Stone Hine, of New Mil- 
ford, Conn. On April 14, 1866, we were 
married. I bought a comfortable house in 
Stamford, Conn., thirty-five miles from New 
York, where we established a happy home. 
I, like two or three hundred other citizens, 
went into New York every morning, and re- 
turned home in the afternoon or evening. 
That summer was delightful. As cold 
weather came on it was rather uncomfortable, 
and I frequently longed for the California cli- 
mate. One morning in February I started for 
the city as usual. It was snowing hard, and 
increased to such an extent that it took us 
until near 3 p.m. to reach New York. I could 
see that it was impossible to go down town 
and back again in time to get home at a rea- 
sonable hour, so I took the train back at once. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



39 



I was more than ever disgusted with New 
York and New England climate. I at once 
proposed to Mrs. Wilson that we should quit 
it and go to California, where it was always 
comfortable. She assented without any hesi- 
tation. By April I had wound up all busi- 
ness and sold out our home, and we were ready 
to leave many warm friends and a delightful 
society for far-off California. We took 
steamer via Isthmus of Panama. There was 
much that was new for Mrs. Wilson to see 
and enjoy, and we had a delightful trip. Two 
days before our arrival at San Francisco I was 
taken down with Panama fever for the fourth 
time. I soon got better, but for several 
weeks I was up and down. In a couple of 
weeks we went to Sacramento City. We then 
drove out to my eight -hundred -acre ranch, six 
miles from the city, over a smooth level road 
six rods wide, all the way in sight of the 
capital and of the snow-capped Sierras. 
There were an old adobe house and an orchard 
on the premises. We decided to build a 
house and improve the property, and make a 
home. In a few months I had completed 
a good-sized house of Gothic architecture, with 
large wing and a hundred feet of piazza. It 
was all we could wish for comfort and style. 
In one year I got set one hundred acres of 
vineyard, new fruit and ornamental trees, 
shrubs, and flowering plants. The place was 
made beautiful. We had quite an extended 
acquaintance and pleasant society in Sacra- 
mento City, which we visited almost daily. 
We entertained considerable company, and it 
was a pleasant home. In May, 1871, when 
the Pacific railroads were completed, Mrs. 
Wilson and myself came East on their second 
through trip for a two months' visit. I spent 
much of my time in New York City, where I 
arranged for the receiving and sale of Cali- 
fornia fruits, to be shipped regularly in car- 



load lots. My vineyard had been set with the 
special kinds considered to be the most desira- 
ble for the New York markets; and I sent 
three carloads of grapes, one at a time, with 
three days intervening between shipments, 
twelve hundred dollars' freight on each car in 
advance. Those three shipments of grapes 
were the first ever made from California to 
New York. After the commission merchants 
and their friends divided up what they wanted, 
there was nothing left to pay cartage, which I 
was asked to pay. That was the first and last 
business I ever had with New York commis- 
sion merchants. Soon after the arrival of 
those grapes in New York I saw numerous peo- 
ple who came to California, and I learned from 
them that they were retailed out at fifty cents 
to one dollar a pound. Draw your own con- 
clusions. I cured many white muscat grapes 
into raisins, packed them in any kind of 
boxes that I could get handy, and sold them 
to Sacramento City grocers at twelve cents a 
pound. I believe they were among the first 
California raisins ever sold in that market. 

In September, 1872, Mrs. Wilson got a tel- 
egram notifying her that her sister, Vesta 
Stone, was dangerously sick with fever. The 
next day Mrs. Wilson was on her way to 
Merryall; but, when she arrived there, the 
sister had passed away, and was in her grave. 
Her father and mother were left alone in 
their old age, both in health and spirits 
broken down. Mrs. Wilson decided that she 
could never leave them while they lived. 
Consequently, I disposed of most of . my be- 
longings in California, and came home to the 
family, where I arrived in March, 1873. 
Then I became a citizen of New Milford. 
Six weeks after my arrival both Mr. and Mrs. 
Stone died within a few hours of each other, 
and were buried together; but they still live 
in loving memory of many friends and rela- 



40 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tives. The care of the old homestead devolved 
upon Mrs. Wilson and myself. Here we kept 
an open house, with the door open for the old 
friends and relatives of Mr. and Mrs. Stone, 
who always availed themselves of paying us 
summer visits, always too short to suit us. 

The early part of the year 1876 the new oil 
field at Bradford, Pa., was discovered; and a 
few weeks after I went there out of curiosity. 
I found it like a new mining town of the Far 
West, felt at home, and decided to take a hand 
with the boys again. I bought oil lands, and 
leased others on a royalty. I also took an in- 
terest in company with several of the old oil 
producers, who had arrived there ahead of me, 
and who had tied up territory that I coveted. 
Among them was the great five-thousand-acre 
tract of the Quintuple Company, in which I 
secured a three-tenths interest. That tract of 
land has proved to be one of the most valuable 
ever discovered. The Hon. Lewis Emery, 
Jr., was at the head of the company. He has 
made himself famous by the large amount of 
money he has made out of the oil business 
and the liberality with which he has used his 
money, especially in fighting the Standard 
Oil Company. He is still at it, with a fair 
prospect of having an independent pipe line to 
tide water within a few months, when he will 
be in a position to do a fair competitive busi- 
ness, and do the oil producers a great benefit. 
His name will live as long as oil flows from 
the ground and after Rockefeller's millions 
are scattered. Mr. Emery has fought almost 
single-handed the Standard Oil Company in 
the courts and in the Pennsylvania legis- 
lature, where the Standard Oil Company gen- 
erally came out ahead; and it is generally 
believed that money was used to influence the 
decision. I sold out my interest in the Quin- 
tuple Oil Company to Mr. Emery and C. S. 
Whitney, a Bradford banker. I made a satis- 



factory trade, but I can see that I should have 
made a million or two by holding on until 
now. 

I was a member of the firm of Wilson, 
Germer & Co., composed of Otto Germer, a 
wealthy manufacturer, of Erie, Pa., Dr. John 
Wilson, a large capitalist, of Pleasantville, 
Pa., and myself. We secured several valua- 
ble tracts of oil lands, upon which we drilled 
many wells. I also bought several producing 
wells, and drilled numerous others on land 
that I secured on my individual account. I 
also drilled several wells in company with 
my brother-in-law. Major E. M. Curtis, of 
Tidioute, Pa. The cost of machinery and 
drilling wells, with tankage to hold the oil, 
was on an average five thousand dollars for 
each well. Within one year after I went to 
Bradford ten thousand people located there. 
All were comfortably housed. It was a gay 
town. The excitement, the extravagance, and 
life were only equalled by San Francisco in 
its early days. Mrs. Wilson and myself lived 
in a first-class hptel. Our house at Merryall 
was never closed, and we spent what time we 
could there in the summer with our friends; 
and I came there several times each year to 
look after business for a few days at a time. 
In the rush to Bradford came the brightest 
and most active young men to be found in 
the larger towns, middle-aged men with their 
families from the older oil fields, laboring 
men seeking employment at good wages, 
drones with large families, seeking a home 
where they hoped to pick up a living some 
way. 

Of course there was more or less sickness 
and destitution. A relief association was 
formed by a few worthy and well-known 
ladies, who went from house to house, looking 
up all cases where kind words of advice, pro- 
visions, clothing, medicine, and sometimes 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



4' 



cash were wanted. Mrs. Wilson was one of 
the most active ladies in that most worthy 
work. Ragged children were clothed. The 
hungry were fed. Shanties were made more 
secure from winter cold. Children and grown 
people were induced into the churches and 
schools, and were taught how to earn a com- 
fortable living. A hospital was established. 
Most of those ladies are still living and car- 
rying on the good work then begun. Those 
children are now young men and women; and 
Mrs. Wilson's name is cherished by them, as 
well as by hundreds of the older citizens of 
Bradford, with loving remembrance. Any- 
thing the ladies of the relief society asked 
for was generously provided by the citizens of 
all denominations and creeds. Bradford has 
never gone backward. It now has a popula- 
tion of fifteen thousand inhabitants, ten 
churches, four theatres, paved streets, water 
works, gas and electric lights. In refinement 
its population is above the average. Its 
musical taste and moral tone are something to 
be proud of. I think Mrs. Wilson and myself 
enjoyed our twelve years' residence in Brad- 
ford better than any place we ever lived in, 
and can now count up more warm personal 
friends there than anywhere else. 

In 1884, while on a short visit to New Mil- 
ford with a friend from Western New York, 
I visited for the first time a feldspar mine, 
which had been worked in a small way twenty 
years, located less than a mile from my resi- 
dence. From what I saw on the surface I at 
once decided that I ought to own the property, 
and the next day with my friend had secured 
it. Later work convinced me that I had se- 
cured the most valuable mine I had ever had 
anything to do with, right in sight of home, 
what I had travelled thousands of miles to 
find, and to which I had devoted the best part 
of my long life. Most of the work so far at 



the mine has been done to prove what I firmly 
believed, that I had a true fissure vein, reach- 
ing down to a very great depth in the earth, 
the bottom of which no one could ever expect 
to find and in the history of mining no one 
ever has found. I have uncovered the foot 
wall of the vein for near three hundred feet in 
length and to a depth of fifty feet. In a drift 
across the vein I have found the hanging wall, 
in perfect order, near fifty feet from the foot 
wall. They are both dipping at the same 
angle, and each one has a clayey coat from 
about a half an inch thick (sHckensides). 
These developments, that cost me much 
money, are a proof to experienced mining 
men that we have an everlasting vein. (See 
Dana's "Manual of Mineralogy and Lithol- 
ogy," p. 413.") In doing this work we took 
■out gems, mica, and feldspar that have been 
sold on the market for more money than I ever 
knew to be taken from any mine in America 
for the same amount of surface work done. 
This was hand work,. without machinery. In 
this statement I include the great Comstock 
vein of Virginia City, with which I am famil- 
iar. 

In two years after we commenced work on 
the mine I made a trade with an English syn- 
dicate for a controlling interest in the mine. 
After more than two years' waiting for the 
money and much trouble, I kicked the trade 
over; and I then bought out my partner's in- 
terest in the property. Other parties agreed 
to buy the property (or a controlling inter- 
est in it). These contracts rather obstructed 
further developments, and most of the time 
for several years it has been closed down; but 
there are more valuables in sight now than 
ever before. The long sickness of my wife, 
which occupied me day and night, her death, 
and the complete breaking-down of my own 
health have prevented my working of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



mine; and I never expect to do much more 
with it. I make this record that future gener- 
ations may know what I know about it, and I 
want to leave a record of what I think of the 
value all the way down deep in the earth. 
Should anybody ever be disappointed in not 
finding great value there, they can say, "Wil- 
son did not know as much as he thought he did." 
Since the death of my wife, March 24, 
1891, I have been alone in the world; but I 
cannot say I have felt lonely. I feel sure 
that my wife and children still live, and that 
they are living a higher and happier life than 
is ever known on earth. I have friends and 
neighbors who are ready at any time to do 
everything possible for me, either in sickness 
or in health. With my reading and my living 
over in memory my rather adventurous life I 
cannot be lonesome. I like this world, and I 
think my home is one of the pleasantest places 
in it. My friends enjoy visiting me, and I 
enjoy their visits. I am leading the kind of 
life that I think will be most likely to 
lengthen out my days, but I do not live in 
dread of being called away. I realize that a 
kind Providence has watched over me these 
many years, and many a shaft of destruction that 
threatened me has been gently turned away; 
and I am confident that I shall not be called 
away until my mission on earth is at an end. 

The portrait of Mr. Wilson, which is pub- 
lished in connection with his interesting auto- 
biography, was engraved on steel from a 
photograph recently taken, and represents him 
as he now appears, at the age of seventy-three 
years. 

-OHN L. BUEL, M.D., proprietor and 
manager of the Spring Hill Home for 
Nervous Invalids at Litchfield, is a 
native of this town, born November 6, 1861, 



a son of the late Henry W. Buel, M.D.., a 
sketch of whose life appears in " Representa- 
tive Men of Connecticut." 

Henry W. Buel, M.D., founder of the 
Spring Hill Home for Nervous Invalids and 
a former President of the First National Bank 
of Litchfield, was born in this town, "which 
has produced so many men of mark," April 7, 
1820, and there died January 30, 1893. As 
his father, Samuel Buel, and also his father's 
brother, William Buel, were physicians of 
prominence, it was not surprising that, after 
graduating with high honors from Yale Col- 
lege in 1844, the young man should enter at 
once upon the study of medicine. He began 
in the ofifice of his father, and later in suc- 
cession with Dr. W. P. Buel and D. Gurdon 
Buck, M.D., of New York City. In 1847 
he was graduated from the New York College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, and with such 
honors that he was immediately appointed 
House Surgeon at the New York Hospital, 
where he remained two years. In 1850 he 
accepted a similar position at Sanford Hall in 
Flushing, N.Y., where, it may be said, com- 
menced his career as an expert in mental dis- 
eases. Resigning his position at Sanford 
Hall after five years, the Doctor came in 1854 
to Litchfield, where he assisted his father for 
two years. With the view of enlarging his 
knowledge of the maladies of the mind and 
body, he then went to Europe, making a tour 
of the larger cities. On his return in 1858 
he founded the Spring Hill Home, where has 
been accomplished the chief work of his life. 
His energy and profound knowledge of the 
specialty he has adopted, backed by his busi- 
ness aptitude, have made the institution a 
complete success. In 1872 he was elected 
President of the State Medical Society, and re- 
ceived a vote of thanks for his annual address 
on "The Advancement of the Medical Profes- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



43 



sion." Outside of his profession in his native 
town and State he has filled several stations 
of honor and trust. For twenty-two years he 
was Vice-President of the First National Bank 
and President from 1887 until the time of his 
death. At one time he was also President of 
the Shepaug Railway Company. Interested 
in the history of his State, he was a member 
of the Connecticut Historical Society, and 
also belonged to the New York University 
Club. In political life he was a zealous Re- 
publican; and in religious faith he was a Con- 
gregationalist, having served as a Deacon in 
the church for thirty years. He was twice 
married. His first marriage, performed March 
24, 1859, was with Mary Ann C. Laidlaw, 
who died December 31, 1864, after a married 
life of less than six years. He afterward 
married Catherine K. Laidlaw, a sister of his 
former wife; and she died August 26, 1882. 
Of his marriages three children are still liv- 
ing; namely, Dr. John L., Minerva W., and 
Katherine L. 

Dr. J. L. Buel was a pupil of the schools of 
this town until seventeen years of age, and 
then spent two years at Phillips Academy in 
Andover, Mass. After this he took a four 
years' course at Yale College, going thence 
to the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 
New York City, trom which he received his 
diploma in 1888. Following in the footsteps 
of his honored father. Dr. Buel spent the suc- 
ceeding two years in the New York Hospital. 
Returning then to the place of his birth, he 
entered upon his profession, acquiring in the 
ensuing year a considerable practice:. At the 
expiration of that time he engaged as an as- 
sistant to his father at the Spring Hill Home, 
remaining in that capacity until the father's 
decease, since which time he has had full con- 
trol of the institution, meeting with eminent 
success. In addition to conducting the home 



he also finds time to attend to a good general 
practice outside the institution. 

On May 28, 1895, Dr. Buel was united in 
marriage with Miss Elizabeth C. Barney, 
daughter of Newcomb C. Barney, a well- 
known broker of New York City. She was 
born at Irvington on the Hudson, where her 
father and grandfather were prominent resi- 
dents for many years. The Doctor is quite 
popular in society. Among the organizations 
he has connection with are the college society 
of Psi Upsilon and the Wolfhead of New 
Haven, the University Club of New York, 
the Graduates' Club of New York and of New 
Haven, the Litchfield Club, and the Litchfield 
County Medical Society. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Litchfield Mutual Insurance Com- 
pany and a Director of the Echo Farm 
Company. In politics Dr. Buel is an uncom- 
promising Republican; but, owing to the high 
esteem in which he is held by his fellow- 
townsmen, who are mostly Democrats, .he was 
elected a Burgess of the borough. He is very 
liberal in his religious views, but attends and 
supports the Episcopal church, of which Mrs. 
Buel is a conscientious member. 




EV. GEORGE FOSTER PREN- 



TISS, pastor of the First Congrega- 
tional Church in Winsted, was born 
in Windham, Vt., September 20, 1858, son 
of Asahel and Hannah (Johnson) Prentiss. 
He is of the same family branch as Dr. 
George Prentiss, of New York, and the late 
Sargent S. Prentiss, of New Orleans. His 
grandfather was Reuben Prentiss, a native of 
New Hampshire and long a resident of West- 
minster, Vt. In this town, while conducting 
his farm, he also worked at the shoemaker's 
bench, a common thing in the early days of 
New England, when almost every farm-house 



44 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



had a little shoe shop attached. The maiden 
name of Grandmother Prentiss was Roxanna 
Upham. She died at threescore and two, 
and her husband lived to be seventy-seven. 
They had six children, of whom two sons 
and two daughters are yet living. Mr. and 
Mrs. Reuben Prentiss are buried in the 
Centre Cemetery at Windham. 

Asahel Prentiss, father of the Rev. Mr. 
Prentiss, who was born in Westminster, Vt., 
in 1830, has a fine farm of three hundred 
acres in Windham, and deals largely in prod- 
uce. He is a prominent man, and has filled 
several town offices, also working zealously 
for the interests of the Congregational church, 
of which he has been Deacon for twenty 
years. His wife, to whom he was married 
in Windham in March, 1857, was a native of 
Lincoln, Me., and was reared in Jackson, Me. 
Her father was Cyrus Johnson, a man of some 
literary talent, the author of poems and other 
writings of local interest. The greater part 
of his time, however, was devoted to farming. 
He died at the age of fifty-six, leaving thir- 
teen children, twelve of whom are yet living, 
scattered from Maine to the Pacific Coast. 
One is a preacher in St. Louis, and one was 
in the first State legislature of Washington. 
The first to die was Henry Johnson, who 
passed away at sixty-five. Mr. and Mrs. 
Prentiss have had six children, of whom the 
Rev. Mr. Prentiss is the eldest. His young- 
est brother, Cyrus Holmes Prentiss, who was 
preparing for the ministry in the University 
of Vermont, was cut off from a promising ca- 
reer in his twenty-second year, dying August 
28, 1894, of spinal meningitis. Carrie 
Keziah is the wife of Edgar M. Butler, of 
Jamaica, Vt. ; Mary Hattie married Emery H. 
Jones, and lives in Windham; Julia May is 
the wife of George M. Butler, of New York 
City; and Charles Reuben is inspector of 



tuning in the Estey Organ Works at Brattje- 
boro, Vt. 

The Rev. George Foster Prentiss studied at 
Oberlin and at Monson, graduating in 1880 
as valedictorian of his class. He graduated 
from Amherst in 1884 with the degree of 
A.B. and at Yale in 1887 with the degree of 
S.T.B. His first pastorate was that of the 
West End Church at Bridgeport, Conn., 
where he was stationed from 1887 to 1893, 
coming in the latter year to his present 
charge. Mr. Prentiss is an enthusiastic and 
zealous worker in his chosen vocation, and an 
ardent lover of music, giving time and study 
con amore to the work of training choirs and 
choruses. He is one of the Vice-Presidents 
of the Connecticut State Music Teachers' 
Association. 

On June 28, 1887, he was married to Sarah 
A., daughter of Lucius Gilbert, of Derby, 
Conn. Mrs. Prentiss is a lady of scholarly at- 
tainments, and was a teacher of Latin and 
Greek before her marriage. Mr. Prentiss is a 
member of the Beta Theta Pi, a society 
founded in Miami in 1839,, which has grown 
to large proportions in the South and West, 
and now has some fifty chapters in the 
United States. 



T^OLONEL GEORGE B. SANFORD, 
I J| a retired officer of the regular army, 

V»^_^ formerly Colonel of the Sixth 
United States Cavalry, and now an honored 
and esteemed resident of Litchfield, was born 
in the city of New Haven, June 28, 1842, 
son of William E. and Margaret S. (Craney) 
Sanford. Colonel Sanford is descended from 
one of the oldest families of the State. His 
ancestors for a period of two hundred and 
fifty years, embracing nine generations, lived 
and died in New Haven County, within a 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



45 



radius of fifteen miles from the city of that 
name. 

Harvey Sanford, paternal grandfather of the 
Colonel, was born in Bethany, and was the 
first of the family to abandon farming. Up 
to then the Sanfords had been large land- 
holders and thriving agriculturists, beginning 
with their first progenitor in this country in 
1639. Grandfather Sanford established a 
banking business, in which he showed himself 
a most successful financier. He was sub- 
sequently President of the National New 
Haven Bank for forty years, and was one of 
the organizers, a stockholder, and an influen- 
tial Director of the New Haven County 
Bank. He retained the office of bank Presi- 
dent until the time of his demise in 1869, at 
the advanced age of eighty-five years. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Mary Lyman,, 
was born in New Haven, daughter of an officer 
in the Continental army. He was descended 
from a prominent family of Northampton, 
Mass., whither the emigrant progenitor of the 
Lyman family located in 1651, and where 
many of his descendants are still living. 
The wife of Harvey Sanford also attained a 
venerable age. She died at New Haven in the 
same year as her husband, having lived four 
score of years. She was the mother of eight 
children, one of whom, James, is yet living. 
William E. Sanford was educated in the 
city of his birth, and began his life career as 
clerk in a store in New York City. He 
afterward established himself in business in 
New Haven, and conducted it until 1855, 
when he retired. Later he engaged in manu- 
facturing, running factories in different local- 
ities, and also undertook steam-fitting and 
other work. In 1865 he retired from active 
business, and thereafter spent much of his 
time in travelling, both in this country and 
Europe. He also changed his residence to 



New York City, where his death occurred 
May 25, 1895, aged eighty-one years. He 
was a noble man, and always remained true to 
the principles in which he was reared. Both 
he and his wife were conscientious members 
of the Protestant Episcopal church. He 
married Margaret S. Craney, the daughter of 
John and Susan Craney, of New York City, 
where her father was a distiller, she being the 
only one of the six children born to her par- 
ents that is now living. She bore her hus- 
band ten children, five of whom are deceased. 
Those living are as follows: Keitty G., mar- 
ried to Charles H. Woodruff; George B., the 
subject of this sketch; Charlotte T., the wife 
of Morris W. Seymour; Elizabeth S., the wife 
of William B. Hornblower; and Frederick C, 
a grape-grower in California. The mother is 
a resident of New York, making her home 
with her son, the Colonel. 

Colonel Sanford spent the first seventeen 
years of his life with his parents, receiving a 
thorough preparation for college. He then 
entered Yale, and was industriously prosecut- 
ing his studies when the Civil War began. 
Young and ardent in the cause of the Union, 
he could not resist President Lincoln's call 
to arms; and he offered himself for service. 
His offer was accepted, and he was appointed 
Second Lieutenant of the First Dragoons in 
the regular army. By the close of the war, 
in recognition of his gallant conduct, he had 
been advanced to the rank of Captain. He 
participated in many engagements, being with 
the Army of the Potomac through its cam- 
paign and a member of Sheridan's cavalry. 
After the close of the Rebellion, Colonel San- 
ford went with his regiment to the Pacific 
Coast, where for eighteen years he was en- 
gaged in warfare with the Indians, under 
the command of General Crook and General 
Miles. He participated in all of the Indian 



46 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



campaigns of that period, being at the fore- 
front in the more important Indian fights 
north of Texas and west of the Mississippi 
River. The record of his promotions is as 
follows: he was commissioned Second Lieu- 
tenant of First Dragoons April 26, 1861, 
First Lieutenant July 20, 1861, Captain Oc- 
tober I, 1862, Major in March, 1876, Lieu- 
tenant Colonel of the Ninth Cavalry August 
20, 1889, Colonel of the Sixth Cavalry July 
22, 1892. Having served his country faith- 
fully for thirty-two years, the Colonel then 
made application for a retirement, and it was 
granted. 

On September 15, 1874, Colonel Sanford 
was married to Gertrude Minturn, of Bristol, 
R.I. Mrs. Sanford is a daughter of Jons 
Minturn, formerly a well-known importer of 
goods from China, but later in life a resident 
of California, where he departed this life in 
1884. Colonel and Mrs. Sanford have two 
children, Margaret and Gertrude M. The 
Colonel is a member of the Sons of the Revo- 
lution, of the Order of the Cincinnati, and 
President of the society formed by the sur- 
vivors of the War of 1812 and their descend- 
ants. He is also a member of the Loyal 
Legion, having been Vice-Commander of the 
Kansas Commandery, and is President of the 
Connecticut Society of the Order of Cincin- 
nati. At the time of his entry into ser- 
vice Colonel Sanford had not completed his 
studies at his Alma Mater; but the faculty of 
Yale College subsequently bestowed upon 
him the degree of A. B., as a compliment to 
his high standing in military and private life. 
He is a man of great force of character, clear- 
headed and firm in his convictions, thor- 
oughly accomplished, and broad and liberal 
minded. He is a true Christian in every sense 
of the term, and with his family is a valued 
member of the Protestant Episcopal church. 



DWARD T. COE, Treasurer of the 
Coe Brass Company, whose plant is at 
Torrington, was born in Waterbury, 
May I, 1848, son of Lyman W. and Eliza 
Coe. His grandfather, Israel Coe, the 
founder of the brass works in Torrington, was 
born in Goshen, December 14, 1794, and was 
the son of Abijah and Sybil (Baldwin) Coe. 
When a boy of thirteen, the accidental dis- 
charge of a gun caused him to lose his right 
arm. So maimed for life, the fact in a meas- 
ure set him apart from his playmates. Only 
a boy can realize what his deprivation was 
when he could no longer use the right hand, 
always kept so busy in boyish sports and 
pleasures. Israel Coe attended the common 
schools and Winsted Academy, and in 181 3 
entered the Torrington cotton factory as clerk, 
remaining till the company failed. From 
1 8 19 to 1820 he was Collector and Constable 
in Goshen; and in 1821 he purchased a hotel 
in Waterbury, which he conducted till 1826. 
He was in the employ of Aaron Benedict as 
agent for gilt buttons for some time, and later 
was partner with Mr. Benedict, the firm name 
being Benedict & Coe. In 1834 he sold his 
interest, purchasing the Willson mill prop- 
erty, and established the Wolcottville Brass 
Company in Wolcottville (now Torrington). 
Mr. Coe was at that time living in Waterbury, 
but later he removed to Wolcottville. Asso- 
ciated with him in the business were' Anson 
G. Phelps, of New York City, and John Hun- 
gerford, each owning one-third of the stock. 
The first effort to manufacture brass kettles by 
the battery process was made in their factory. 
The work included rolling the brass. Some 
difficulty having been experienced in mixing 
the metal, Mr. Coe in 1842 went to England 
in quest of further knowledge on the subject. 
On this trip he visited the most reputable 
brass works in that country, and at length 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



47 



learned the right materials and proper propor- 
tions of the compound. On May 19, 1841, the 
original copartnership was dissolved; and a 
joint stock company was formed under the 
name of the Wolcottville Brass Company, 
with a capital of fifty-six thousand dollars, 
Israel Coe being President of the company 
and Lyman W. Coe, his son, Secretary and 
Treasurer. Israel Coe finally retired from 
active business, spending his last years with a 
daughter in Waterbury, and died at the age of 
ninety-six. To his sagacity and energy the 
State of Connecticut owes a most flourishing 
industry, that is reckoned among the largest of 
its kind in the world. 

Lyman W. Coe, son of Israel, was born 
June 20, 1820, at Torrington Hollow. He 
worked as clerk in Terryville until 1834, 
when he entered the store of Wadhams, Coe 
& Co., remaining two years. Then he was 
employed by Lewis McKee & Co. at Terry- 
ville, merchants, and the builders of the first 
lock manufactory in the country. He was 
three years here, when in 1841 he was ap- 
pointed Secretary of the Wolcottville Brass 
Company. This position he resigned in 
1845; and in the following year he received 
charge of a brass wire mill at Cotton Hollow, 
owned by the Waterbury Brass Company. He 
was subsequently appointed Secretary and 
Treasurer of the same company, and was its 
general business manager until 1863, when 
he resigned. He then bought up the stock of 
the Wolcottville Brass Company, and formed 
a new corporation under the name of the Coe 
Brass Company, with a capital of one hundred 
thousand dollars. In this way the father's 
business passed into the hands of the son, and 
under his efificient management prosperity 
continued to smile upon the enterprise. A 
good business man by inheritance, and with a 
vision widened by experience, his methods of 



management always bring the best results. 
Lyman W. Coe was elected to the legislature 
in 1845, to the lower house in 1858, to the 
Senate from the Fifth District in 1862, from 
the Fifteenth District in 1876, and re-elected 
for two years in 1877. He was pre-eminently 
the leading man of Torrington, both socially 
and commercially, and was generally liked 
and respected. At his death, which occurred 
in 1893, when he was in his seventy-fourth 
yeai", the entire force of men in his employ, 
eight hundred or more, attended the funeral 
in a body; and all Torrington mourned as for 
an irreparable loss. Intelligently philan- 
thropic, he was always ready to aid a worthy 
cause, whether for private or public benefit. 
Mr. and Mrs. Coe attended the Episcopal 
church, in which he was Warden many years. 
Mrs. Coe is still living, having reared three 
children, namely: Adelaide, who married 
W. H. K. Godfrey; Edward T. Coe; and 
Ella. 

Edward T. Coe, the subject of this sketch, 
attended a private school in Waterbury, the 
Gunnery School in Washington, and General 
Russell's School in New Haven. When eigh- 
teen years of age, he entered his father's man- 
ufactory to learn the practical part of the 
work, and after remaining some time in the 
work-rooms entered the office as book-keeper. 
He has now held the position of Treasurer 
some fifteen years, giving adequate proof that 
his father's mantle has not fallen on unworthy 
shoulders. A thorough business man, Mr. 
Coe is also a true gentleman; and his courtesy 
and consideration for all with whom he is 
brought in contact have won for him universal 
esteem. In 1873 he married Lilly A. 
Wheeler, daughter of Amos Wheeler, for- 
merly a leading merchant of Avon. During 
the last years of his life Mr. Wheeler was a 
resident of Torrington, where he died. Mrs. 



48 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Coe was one of six children, the rest of whom 
were: Frank M. Wheeler, a shipping clerk 
Pearly A., station agent at Collinsville 
Nelly W., who married Edward T. Holly 
Homer C, a merchant; Leonard, in the 
employ of the Coe Brass Company. Mrs. 
Wheeler attends the Congregational church, 
of which her husband was also a member. 
Politically, Mr. Coe supports the Republican 
platform. He was in the legislature in 1886. 
He is prominent in Masonic circles, being a 
member of Seneca Lodge of Torrington and 
of Royal Arch Chapter; and he is also a 
member of the association of Knights of 
Honor. His religious belief is that of the 
Episcopal church, and his wife is a Congrega- 
tionalist. 




CHILLE F. MIGEON, a prominent 
manufacturer of Litchfield County, 
President of the Union Hardware 
Company of Torrington and a leader in other 
industrial enterprises, was born in Millbury, 
Mass., February 7, 1833, son of Henri and 
Marie Louise (Baudelot) Migeon. Mr. 
Migeon's father was born in Haraucourt, 
France, September 11, 1799. He was en- 
gaged in the manufacture of woollen goods, 
and in 1828 came to the United States for the 
purpose of introducing French machinery for 
the woollen manufacturing industries of this 
country. He was provided with a letter of in- 
troduction from General Lafayette to Philip 
Hone, the Mayor of New York City, by whom 
he was courteously received; and, being fa- 
vorably impressed with the outlook for future 
prosperity, he decided to settle permanently 
in America. 

Henri Migeon returned to France, bearing 
messages of grateful acknowledgment to Gen- 
eral Lafayette from many leading citizens, 
and in 1829 brought his family to this coun- 



try. He was urged by Governor Wolcott to 
settle in Wolcottville, Conn., now Torring- 
ton; but, more favorable financial induce- 
ments being offered him in Millbury, Mass., 
he decided to locate there. In 1833, how- 
ever, he moved to Torrington, where he was 
employed in the woollen mills for a few 
years, and then established his residence in 
Litchfield, Conn., where he became the owner 
of the Dr. Oliver Wolcott estate, the spacious 
grounds of which enabled him to gratify his 
taste for horticulture. In 1837 Mr. Henri 
Migeon introduced an invention of his own, a 
method of refinishing broadcloths, which com- 
pletely revolutionized the trade. He estab- 
lished his headquarters in New York City, and 
was eminently successful in his new enter- 
prise. He retired in 1854, and passed the 
remainder of his days in Torrington. As a 
citizen he was loyal and public-spirited. He 
did much toward beautifying the streets of 
the town by setting out shade trees. He was 
deeply interested in the public schools, and 
was accustomed to give annual gifts to the 
pupils, in the Centennial year presenting each 
with a bright new coin, bearing the date 1876. 
Mr. Henri Migeon possessed intellectual 
attainments of a high order, and was not only 
well informed upon important political issues 
of America and Europe, but was familiar with 
the current literature of his day. He paid 
many visits to his native country, and was 
presented at the court of Napoleon HI. when 
that emperor was in the height of his prosper- 
ity. Henri Migeon died in 1876, aged sev- 
enty-seven years. His wife, Marie Louise 
Baudelot, who was a native of France, be- 
came the mother of seven children, six of 
whom are living, and are as follows: Pau- 
line, wife of Hiram W. Hayden; Florentine 
S., wife of Frederick Seymour (both dcr 
ceased); Eliza, wife of G. B. Turrell; 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



49 



Achille F., the subject of this sketch; Ar- 
cane, Mrs. Henry Munson; Adele, wife of 
Francis V. Baudelot; and Louise, wife of Cap- 
tain Brahy, who received the decoration of the 
Legion of Honor. Mrs. Marie L. Migeon 
died on board the steamship "Lafayette," 
while returning from Europe. 

Achille F. Migeon passed his boyhood in 
Torrington, where he resided until 1843, 
when his parents moved to Litchfield ; and 
he commenced his education in the schools 
of that town. He later attended school in 
Tarrytown, N.Y., and after a course at the 
Irvington Institute completed his studies at 
the Hampden Institute. At the age of six- 
teen he entered mercantile pursuits' as clerk 
in a store in Waterbury, Conn., where he re- 
mained for two years; and he then went to 
the Middlesex Mills in Lowell, Mass., for 
the purpose of acquiring a knowledge of the 
woollen manufacture. 

After eighteen months of practical observa- 
tion in the woollen mills Mr. Migeon became 
connected with his father's business in New 
York City; and in 1854, when he was twenty- 
one years of age, he, in company with his 
brother-in-law, Mr. Turrell, purchased the 
enterprise, which they conducted until 1864. 
He then sold his interest in the business to 
his partner, and devoted his entire attention 
to the development of what is now the Union 
Hardware Company of Torrington, in which 
he had already become interested. He moved 
the plant to its present location, adding to its 
capacity by the erection of new buildings as 
business increased; and at the present time 
the company, of which. Mr. Migeon is Presi- 
dent, employs three hundred and fifty work- 
men. Under his energetic management the 
Union Hardware Company has expanded into 
large proportions; and their specialties, which 
consist of roller and ice skates, dog collars. 



gun implements, tackle blocks, police sup- 
plies, such as belts, clubs, handcuffs, 
shackles, etc., are used extensively throughout 
the country. 

Mr. Migeon is President of the Eagle Bi- 
cycle Company, of which he was one of the 
principal promoters, President of the New 
Process Nail Company, and is actively inter- 
ested in the Excelsior Needle Company, of 
which he is also President, and which from a 
small beginning has developed into the largest 
industry of its kind in the world. Mr. 
Migeon is a large stockholder and a Director 
of the Parrot Silver and Copper Mining Com- 
pany of Butte,. Mont. Of the Bridgeport 
Copper Company of Connecticut he is Presi- 
dent, and he is a Director of the brass works. 
He is a stockholder in the Torrington Water 
Works. He was made a Mason in the Charter 
Oak Lodge of New York City in 1854, and is 
now a member of the Seneca Lodge and of the 
Chapter, the Council, and the Commandery. 

In 1858 Mr. Migeon was united in marriage 
with Elizabeth Farrell, daughter of Almon 
and Rtith E. (Warner) Farrell, of Waterbury, 
Conn. Almon Farrell was the founder of a 
large foundry and machine shop, and was ex- 
tensively engaged as a millwright, many of 
the most important mills Jn the Naugatuck 
valley having been erected by him. He was 
for many years prominently identified with 
the industrial enterprises in the vicinity of 
Waterbury. He died in 1857, aged fifty- 
seven years. He and his wife were the parents 
of seven children, four of whom are still liv- 
ing, namely: Franklin; Juliet, wife of William 
Knowles; Elizabeth; and Eleanor, wife of 
Leverett Bowen. The mother died at the age 
of seventy-six years. Mr. and Mrs. Migeon 
have two children, as follows: Virginia 
Baudelot, who married Dr. Edwin Swift, of 
New York City, and has one child, named 



5° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Elizabeth; and Clara Louise (Cherie), who 
resides at home. Virginia was educated at 
the Convent of the Sacred Heart, New York 
City; and Clara Louise (Cherie) attended Dr. 
West's school in Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mr. Migeon is a Republican in politics, and 
has served as Town Agent and Assessor. He 
represented his district in the legislature in 
1877 and again in 1879, ^.nd has held other 
offices of public trust. Mr. Migeon and his 
family occupy one of the finest residences in 
Torrington, erected upon a desirable piece of 
ground, which he purchased in 1867. They 
attend the Episcopal church. 

The foregoing sketch of Mr. Achille F. 
Migeon will be highly appreciated by the 
readers of the " Review, " both on account of the 
character, ability, and enterprise of the Messrs. 
Migeon, father and son, and also by reason of 
the gratitude and reverence cherished by all 
true Americans for the memory of the distin- 
guished friend of the elder Migeons in 
France, Lafayette — the noble "knight of 
liberty." 

«■*•** ■ 

' ^RS. ELIZA P. WETMORE, one 
of the most respected residents of 
Winsted, is the widow of John 
Grinnell Wetmore, a wealthy manufacturer of 
Winsted, who died in 1887. The name of 
this family was originally Whitmore, then 
Witmore, and finally Wetmore. ' Thomas 
Whitmore came from the west of England to 
Boston in 1635; and John Whitmore was in 
Wethersfield, Conn., in 1640. The Wetmore 
Genealogy states that Samuel was the great- 
great-grandfather, John the great-grandfather, 
Seth the grandfather, and John the father of 
Mrs. Wetmore's husband. 

John Wetmore was born in October, 1780. 
He was a farmer in Winchester, this county, 
and for a time was fairly well-to-do. But he 




suffered severe losses; and at the time of his 
death, which occurred in 1823, he had very 
little to leave his children. His wife, also 
born in October, 1780, whose maiden name 
was Huldah Spencer, daughter of Captain 
Thomas Spencer, was the mother of seven 
children. She survived her husband, entered 
the second time into the matrimonial bonds 
with Jonathan Coe, a man in good circum- 
stances, formerly husband of her deceased 
sister, and died in 1845. 

John Grinnell Wetmore had scant lesources 
when he started in business, but he held the 
secret of success. He prospered as a woollen 
manufacturer and in the manufacture of pins, 
an industry which he established in Winsted, 
and which has largely increased the growth of 
the town. The New England Pin Company, 
which was started under his auspices, was for 
over thirty years under his control, turning 
out great quantities and fine grades of pins. 
The prize medal " Extra New England Pins, 
Ultra," are superior to all others, and took 
the first prize at the World's Fair in Chicago. 
Each paper contains three hundred and sixty 
pins. In loose pins the New England Com- 
pany turns out twelve sizes. Mr. Wetmore 
was a bright and ingenious man, of indomi- 
table energy. His early demise was partly due 
to overwork. 

Mrs. Wetmore's maiden name was Eliza 
Phebe Lee. She was born in Springfield, 
Mass., and was the daughter of Colonel Ros- 
well and Phebe (Potter) Lee, the former of 
New York State, the latter of Hamden, Conn. 
Colonel Lee was a mechanic, and connected 
with the Springfield Armory as superintendent 
for twenty years. He was a Colonel in the 
reserve forces in the last war with Great 
Britain. His wife died in 1869, at the age of 
eighty-six years, a very bright and active old 
lady. They had twelve children, six sons and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



51 



six daughters, eight of whom reached matu- 
rity. Now Mrs. Wetmore is the only one liv- 
ing. Her brother, Henry Washington Lee, 
was rector of Christ Church, Springfield, for 
nine years and of St. Luke's at Rochester, 
N.Y., for seven years. When about forty 
years of age, he was consecrated bishop of a 
diocese in Iowa. Thereafter he resided in 
Davenport, of that State, where he died in 
1874, fifty-nine years old, leaving a widow, 
two sons, and one daughter. 

Mrs. Eliza P. Wetmore's early home was 
on Armory Hill, at Liberty Square, where she 
lived up to the time of her marriage. She 
perfected her education at a young ladies' 
seminary, and was married November i, 1848. 
She then came to Winsted, where she has since 
resided. She has no children; but a daugh- 
ter's place is filled by Louise Wetmore 
Spaulding, child of Jay E. and Eliza Rosset- 
ter (Wetmore) Spaulding. Miss Spaulding's 
father is General Manager of the Winsted Pin 
Company, which was organized in 1851, with 
the late Mr. Wetmore at its head. Mrs. 
Wetmore resides at the home erected by her 
husband in 1869, into which they moved in 
1870. The estate comprises several acres of 
beautiful lawn and grounds, with fine green- 
house and barn, and is one of the most beauti- 
ful in this section of the State. 




rrSllTRAM PULVER, senior member of 
the firm of H. Pulver & Son, car- 

riage manufacturers of Torrington, 

was born in Copake, Columbia County, N.Y., 
December i, 1825, son of Cornelius M. and 
Phoebe (Van Duser) Pulver. Both his par- 
ents were natives of Copake. His grand- 
father, Michael Pulver, was born in the same 
town, where the family were early settlers, 
and passed his life there, engaged in farming. 



Cornelius Pulver, our subject's father, was a 
shoemaker by trade, and spent his life on the 
farm, dividing his time between the shoe- 
rtiaker's bench and the fields that yielded their 
harvests to his labor. He died at the age of 
sixty. Cornelius Pulver married Phoebe Van 
Duser, whose term on earth covered the same 
number of years, she also passing away at 
sixty. They reared eleven children, three of 
whom are now living: Hiram, our special sub- 
ject; Caroline, who married John Fellows; 
and Mary Ann, who is now Mrs. Shattuck. 
Mr. Pulver was a member of the' Universalist 
church, and his wife was a Congregationalist. 

Hiram Pulver worked at farming in his 
youth. He went to Salisbury when about 
nineteen years of age, and there learned the 
trade of a carriage-maker, subsequently work- 
ing as a journeyman in Salisbury and in 
Dutchess County, New York. In the latter 
place he conducted an independent business 
for some time. In 1845 he came to Torrington 
to take the position of foreman in a carriage 
factory, and remained till 1852. In that year, 
infected with the gold fever, he went to Cali- 
fornia; but the cost of living was so great 
and the comforts of life were so few that Mr. 
Pulver, like many other Eastern men, made 
but a short stay. He returned in 1854, and 
started in the carriage business in a small way 
in Torrington. Year by year his trade in- 
creased, so that in 1878 he was enabled to 
build and equip his present extensive factory. 
He has a large business in carriage making 
and repairing, and in fact is the leading car- 
riage manufacturer in the vicinity. 

In 1847 Mr. Pulver married Mary, daughter 
of Herod Hubbard, of Salisbury. She died at 
the age of twenty-four, leaving one child; and 
Mr. Pulver subsequently married Jane Kim- 
berly, a native of Torrington and daughter of 
David Kimberly, formerly a well-known tan- 



52 



BIOGRAPHICAL JIEVIEW 



ner and butcher of that town, but who is now 
deceased. By his second wife Mr. Pulver had 
four children, namely: Albert H., the junior 
member of the firm and the business manager 
of the factory; Hudson J., M.D., a full ac- 
count of whose career will be found elsewhere 
in this work; and Frank, now a student in 
college. A daughter, Frances, died at eight 
years of age. 

Mr. Pulver votes the Republican ticket. 
He and his wife are members of the First 
Congregational Church. 



tLBERT H. PULVER, the junior mem- 
ber of the firm of H. Pulver & Son 
y^ , and manager of the factory, was 

born in Torrington, December 22, 1852, and 
received his education in the common schools 
of that town. He learned the trade of car- 
riage-making with his father, and was ad- 
mitted to partnership in the business in 1875, 
the firm name then becoming H. Pulver & 
Son. He is an efficient manager, and is- a 
potent factor in the success of the enterprise. 

On June 15, 1877, Albert H. Pulver mar- 
ried Florence I. Neil, of Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Her father is a skilled coppersmith, and is 
now living at the home of his son-in-law and 
working in the carriage shop. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pulver have three children: Essie A., Hiram 
N., and Albert H. 

In political views Albert Pulver agrees with 
his father, voting the Republican ticket. He 
and his wife are members of the First Congre- 
gational Church. 



ERRITT McNEIL, senior member 
of the McNeil Pharmacy Company 
of Torrington, which has one of 
the largest establishments of the kind in the 




State, was born in Torrington, September 13, 
1865, son of Charles and Emeline (Loveland) 
McNeil. Charles McNeil was a native of 
Litchfield. He attended school in Water- 
town, and entering a drug store in that town 
as clerk became familiar with the business. 
In 1850 he opened an apothecary store in Tor- 
rington, and was the pioneer in the drug busi- 
ness in the Naugatuck valley, his establish- 
ment being the only one of the kind in the 
locality. Mr. McNeil also had a post-office 
in the building, and was Postmaster for 
twenty-five consecutive years. In 1858 he 
purchased a small building on the site of the 
present handsome establishment, and put in a 
stock of drugs. His business prospered as 
years went on, and he enlarged his building 
and added to his stock in trade. He was 
again appointed Postmaster under President 
Cleveland in 1888, and served four years, his 
term of service in all covering thirty years. 
But his official duties did not interfere with 
the prosperity of his drug business; for in 
i8go, when he retired from active work, he 
was still the leading druggist of the locality. 
Mr. McNeil was a capable business man, far- 
sighted and discreet in his ventures. He was 
a stockholder in the Torrington Water Com- 
pany and in the Electric Light Company, 
being one of the early promoters of the latter 
corporation. Politically, he was a stanch 
Democrat, and represented his district in the 
legislature three times. He was a Mason of 
long standing, a veteran of Seneca Lodge of 
Torrington. He was well-known and popular 
throughout the district, and was universally 
mourned when he passed away, February 14, 
1893. Mr. McNeil was then in his sixty-fifth 
year. His wife is a daughter of Ashbel Love- 
land, a farmer of Watertown. Mr. and Mrs. 
Loveland died on the family homestead, the 
former at the age of eighty-four, the latter at 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



S3 



seventy. They were the parents of five chil- 
dren, three of whom are living, na:mely: 
Maria, wife of Henry DeForest; Elmira, wife 
of Henry E. Judd ; and the mother of Merritt 
McNeil, who was the youngest of the family. 
She is still living, making her home with her 
son Merritt. She is a member of the Episco- 
pal church, in whose interest her late husband 
was an active worker, organizing the society 
in Torrington, and raising by subscription the 
money to build the present fine church edifice. 
He was clerk of the church for many years, 
and was also active in the Sunday-school. 
Mr. and Mrs. McNeil reared but one child be- 
sides the subject of this sketch, a son Frank, 
who also is a member of the Pharmacy Com- 
pany. He was born July 13, 1852, and after 
attending the schools in Torrington studied at 
the Cheshire Military Academy for three 
years, at the end of that time going to work 
for his father, and acting in the capacity of 
clerk until the business was given into the 
control of his brother and himself. He was 
married in 1876 to Addie Brooker, of Chester, 
whose parents were among the early settlers of 
Torrington, and died in that town. Frank Mc- 
Neil has two daughters, Gertrude and Rowena. 
Merritt McNeil attended the common and 
high schools of Torrington. He also studied 
at Wesleyan Academy, Wilbraham, and at the 
Park Avenue Institute, at Bridgeport, prepar- 
ing for a medical college. He, however, did 
not enter college, but took an inductive 
course in the practical use of drugs in his 
father's store, and on the retirement of the 
latter was fully qualified to superintend the 
large and important business. Mr. McNeil 
married Gertrude M. Hunter, only daughter 
of A. J. Hunter, of Gardiner, Me., who 
moved to Florida when Mrs. McNeil was only 
a child. Her mother is still living, but her 
father died some time since^ 



In political questions Mr. McNeil is inde- 
pendent. He is not an office-seeker, but has 
served on the Board of Selectmen. He and 
his wife are members of the Episcopal church, 
as are also his brother and wife. The McNeil 
Pharmacy Company have a very handsome es- 
tablishment on Main Street, Torrington ; and 
the brothers have proved by their successful 
management of the business their right to a 
place in the ranks of Torrington' s leading 
business men. 



M 



R. JAMES E. BISHOP, an enter- 
prising and successful business man 
of Thomaston, was born in the town 
of Madison, New Haven County, on the i6th 
of April, 1826, son of Charles and Mary 
(Bacon) Bishop and grandson of John and 
Irena (Bartlett) Bishop. 

John Bishop, who was of English parentage, 
was a native of Madison, Conn., and passed 
the major part of his life in that town. When 
seventeen years of age, he entered the Ameri- 
can army during the Revolutionary War as a 
drummer boy. During the progress of the 
battle of Saratoga, which" compelled the sur- 
render of General Burgoyne, he seized a gun, 
and did such valiant service that he was after- 
ward promoted to the rank of Corporal. At 
the close of the war he returned to Madison, 
where he engaged in agriculture during the 
remainder of his days. He lived to the ad- 
vanced age. of ninety-six years. His wife, 
Irena (Bartlett) Bishop, bore him a son and 
three daughters. Charles Bishop, the son, 
began at an early age to learn the trade of a 
ship-carpenter, at which he worked for many 
years in his native town. Subsequently, in 
1840, he removed to Litchfield, where he died 
in the eightieth year of his age. He and his 
wife, Mary (Bacon) Bishop, who was a daugh- 
ter of Josiah Bacon, reared three sons, of 



54 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



whom two are still living; namely, James E. 
Bishop and Charles Bishop. The latter, who 
is now sixty-three years of age, is a success- 
ful merchant in Litchfield. Their mother 
died in Litchfield when she was eighty-nine 
years old. She was a communicant of the 
Episcopal church, of which her husband was 
an attendant. 

James E. Bishop was fourteen years old at 
the time his parents removed from Madison to 
Litchfield. He remained with them until he 
was twenty years of age, acquiring a good 
practical common-school education and assist- 
ing his father on the farm. He also worked 
at the trade of a carpenter and joiner. On 
leaving home he went to Thomaston, where 
he secured a position with the Seth Thomas 
Clock Company. Beginning there at the low- 
est round of the ladder, he worked his way up 
step by step until he became foreman in the 
shops. He was employed by the company over 
forty years, during seventeen of which he had 
the entire supervision of the machinery. Nat- 
ure had endowed him with mechanical in- 
genuity. This, with the habits of industry 
acquired during his home life on the farm and 
a readiness to make the most of his opportuni- 
ties, enabled him to win the success he has 
attained. By working over time he has re- 
ceived five or six days' extra pay during a 
single month; and during an entire year he 
has worked thirteen days over full time. He 
has also engaged to some extent in carpentry, 
erecting his present home and other houses in 
the village, which had but thirty-six houses 
when he first came. 

He was married at twenty-four years of age 
to Miss Eliza Scoville, ^vho was born in Had- 
dam. Conn. Their union has been brightened 
by the birth of one daughter, Julia, who mar- 
ried Charles Norton, a successful machinist, 
and has two children, Ida and Fanny, at- 



tending school at Torrington, Conn. In po- 
litical views Dr. Bishop is a stanch Repub- 
lican. In 1882 he was appointed a Justice of 
the Peace, and has served acceptably in other 
offices, among which may be mentioned that 
of Assessor and Collector for many years. 
At the present time he is acting as chairman 
of the cemetery committee. He was one of 
the most active promoters of the Thomaston 
Water Company and the one who was instru- 
mental in obtaining the charter for the works 
from the legislature. Dr. Bishop is an ac- 
tive and influential member of the Congrega- 
tional church. 




ON. GEORGE M. WOODRUFF, a 
prominent lawyer, a railway commis- 
sioner, and a Judge of the Probate 
Court since 1868, is a well-known resident of 
Litchfield, Conn. He was born in this town 
on March 3, 1836, and comes of ancient and 
distinguished ancestry. Litchfield was the 
birthplace of his father, George C. Woodruff, 
of his grandfather, Morris Woodruff, and of 
his great-grandfather, James Woodruff, the 
latter having been ushered into this world 
August 21, 1749. 

The immigrant ancestor was Matthew 
Woodruff, who first located in Hartford, mov- 
ing from there to Farmington in 1672, being 
one of the eighty-four proprietors of that town- 
ship, afterward spending his life there. His 
son Nathaniel became one of the original set- 
tlers of the town of Litchfield, buying one- 
sixtieth right to the land August 8, 1721, and 
moving his family here very soon. His son, 
Jacob Woodruff, was reared on the old home- 
stead until becoming of age, when he bought 
a tract of land in that part of the town now 
called Morris, and there improved and cleared 
a farm from the forest, living there until his 
death in 1790, aged seventy-three years. A 




GEORGE M. WOODRUFF. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



57 



man of ability and prominence, he repre- 
sented the town in the General Court in the 
years 1759 and 1768, was one of five men 
chosen as a Committee of Inspection, and 
from 1759 until 1763 was the only magistrate 
at South Farms. He was also a volunteer 
soldier in the war of the Revolution. 

James Woodruff, the youngest son of Jacob, 
was born, as above mentioned, in 1749, and 
became one of the well-to-do and substantial 
farmers of this locality. Like his father, he 
also served in the Revolutionary army, first 
in New York City and afterward in the bat- 
tles along the. Hudson River. He was a life- 
long resident of Litchfield, dying here in 
1813. He was twice married, rearing four 
children by his first wife and two by his 
second, Morris being the eldest child of the 
second marriage. 

Morris Woodruff was brought up to farm 
labor, but early abandoned agriculture in 
favor of a mercantile career, becoming a clerk 
in the village of Morris, in the employ of 
Simeon Harrison, with whom he subsequently 
formed a partnership in connection with David 
Levitt, who afterward moved to New York, 
and became very wealthy. After the dissolu- 
tion of this partnership Grandfather Woodruff 
purchased the business, which he conducted 
successfully for several years. In 1836 he 
came to the village of Litchfield, living here 
retired until his demise, May 19, 1840, at 
the age of threescore and three years. He 
was a man of great intelligence and influence, 
active in the management of public affairs, 
and in 18 14 was appointed Magistrate by the 
General Assembly, an office which he held 
during life, and was also Associate Judge of 
the County Court for eleven years. For sev- 
eral years he represented the town in the Gen- 
eral Assembly. He was likewise prominent 
in military circles, being appointed Captain 



in the Thirteenth Regiment of the Connecti- 
cut Volunteer Militia in 1809 by Governor 
Jonathan Trumbull, and in the next few years 
passing through all the ranks, receiving his 
commission as Major-general in 1824 from 
General Wolcott, then Governor of the State. 
He married Candace Cotton, who bore him 
six children, two dying in infancy, George C. 
being the eldest. 

George C. Woodruff passed the first years of 
his life at the home of his parents in South 
Farms, attending first the district school and 
afterward the village academy, which was con- 
ducted by one of his ancestors. He subse- 
quently continued his studies at a private 
school in Bethlehem, under the tutorage of 
the Rev. John Langdon, being there fitted for 
college, and was graduated from Yale College 
in 1825. He entered the Litchfield Law 
School the same year, under Judge Gould, and 
in 1827 received his diploma, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar. The following summer he 
began the practice of his profession, which he 
continued for fifty-seven years, being one of 
the most active and best-known practitioners 
of the county. His death in 1885, at the 
advanced age of eighty years, was felt as a 
loss to the community and to the bar. He 
was considered one of the leading lawyers of 
this county, and in some specialties he had no 
superior in the entire State. For several 
years he served as County Judge. In the mi- 
litia he was Major of Division Two, and sub- 
sequently was made Division Inspector, with 
the rank of Colonel, serving in this capacity 
from 1829 until 1833. 

Following in the political footsteps of his 
ancestors, Colonel Woodruff was a stanch 
member of the Democratic party; and in 1861 
he represented his party in Congress. When 
a young man, he acted as Assistant Postmaster 
of Litchfield; and from 1829 until his resigna- 



58 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tion in favor of a younger brother he held the 
office of Postmaster. The maiden name of 
his wife was Henrietta S. Seymour. She was 
a sister of the late Chief Justice of Connecti- 
cut, and was born in the town of Litchfield, 
where her father was engaged in merchandis- 
ing, and also carried on farming as a pastime. 
He was one of the foremost men of the place, 
being High Sheriff for many years, besides 
holding various other offices of trust. He was 
a native-born citizen, being a son of Major 
Moses Seymour, who was an officer of the 
Revolution and a lifelong resident of Litch- 
field. Colonel Woodruff and his wife were 
very active workers in the Congregational 
church and among its most valued members. 
She survived her husband, attaining the ripe 
old age of fourscore and six years. 

George M. Woodruff was the only child 
reared by his parents, and on him was lavished 
the attention due the only son. Much care 
was given to his moral as well as his intellect- 
ual development, he being well trained at the 
home fireside, while he acquired the rudi- 
ments of his education in the district schools. 
At the age of fifteen years he was sent to 
Phillips Academy at Andover, Mass., and 
. after finishing his course at that institution 
entered Yale College, from which he was 
graduated in 1857. Having studied law one 
year in his father's office, Mr. Woodruff at- 
tended the Cambridge Law School, and in 
1859 was admitted to the bar in Litchfield 
County. Continuing in active practice until 
his appointment as railway commissioner in 
1874, he won a reputation as one of the 
strongest and most able lawyers in this sec- 
tion of the State, his record being unsur- 
passed. In 1868 he was appointed Judge of 
Probate, and with the exception of one term 
has served in this office since that time. 

On June 13, i860, Judge Woodruff was 



united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth F. Par- 
sons, a native of Flushing, L. I., a daughter 
of James B. Parsons, a retired merchant, for- 
merly carrying on a large dry-goods business 
in New York City. In 1880 Mr. Parsons 
came to Litchfield, and here spent his declin- 
ing years, dying at the venerable age of 
eighty-five. He married Eliza T. Cock, who 
survives him. Both were true believers in 
the Quaker faith. Four of their six children 
are still living, the mother making her home 
with the youngest daughter in Denver, Col. 
The union of Judge and Mrs. Woodruff has 
been hallowed by the birth of three children: 
George Catten, Eliza Parsons, and James Par- 
sons. George C, the eldest, is editor and 
proprietor of the Litchfield Enquirer. He is 
finely educated, being a graduate of Amherst 
College, having also been a student at Yale, 
and is well fitted for the profession of journal- 
ism. He married Lucy E. Crawford, of Balti- 
more, Md. Eliza P. is the wife of Alexander 
McNeill, a broker in New York City. She 
is quite accomplished, having completed her 
studies at Miss Porter's School in Farmington. 
James P., a lawyer in the office with his 
father, is a graduate of Amherst College and 
Yale Law School, and a man of good mental 
ability and attainments. He married Miss 
Lillian C. Bell, of New York. 

Judge Woodruff has been indefatigable in 
advancing the prosperity of his native town 
and county, serving with fidelity in its various 
offices, having been Town Treasurer since 
i860. For three terms, in 1863, 1865, and 
1872, he represented the town in the State 
legislature. He is President of the Litch- 
field Savings Society and Treasurer of the 
Litchfield Fire Insurance Company. In poli- 
tics he is one of the most prominent members 
of the Democratic party. He has been Dea- 
con of the Congregational church since 1859, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



S9 



and Avas superintendent of the Sunday-school 
for twenty-nine years. His wife and children 
are also active in the work of that church, 
being among its most faithful members. 

A portrait of Judge Woodruff is appropri- 
ately placed in this gallery of Litchfield 
County worthies. 




LMON C. RANDALL, President of 
the Iron Bank of Falls Village, was 
born in Greenwich, Conn., Septem- 
ber 21, 1817, son of John and Laura (Beach) 
Randall. Mr. Randall's grandfather, Tim- 
othy Randall, resided in Bridgewater, Conn., 
was a weaver by trade, and died at the age of 
eighty-nine. His children were : Polly, Sally, 
John, Betsey, Allen, Smith, and Epinetus. 
John Randall, Mr. Randall's father, was a 
native of Greenwich. He adopted agriculture 
as an occupation, becoming a prosperous 
farmer, and also engaged in the manufacture 
of brick. He died in Bridgewater, at the age 
of seventy-six. His wife, Laura Beach, who 
was a daughter of Caleb Beach, of Bridge- 
water, Conn., bore him five children; namely, 
Caroline, Almon C. (the subject of this 
sketch). Aim Ira, Flora, and Emeline. She 
died at the age of eighty-six. 

Almon C. Randall attended the schools of 
his native town. At the age of fifteen he 
worked as a farm laborer for five dollars per 
month. He continued in that occupation for 
two years, at the expiration of which time he 
entered mercantile business as a clerk. After 
serving in that capacity for four years he 
became a partner with his employer. Two 
years later he was forced to withdraw from the 
firm, after losing all he possessed, and he 
again resumed clerking. He had been so en- 
gaged for two years more when hard work 
resulted in ill health, and he was obliged to 



relinquish active employment for some time. 
Upon the restoration of his health he secured 
a position in the Bridgeport Bank. Later he 
became Cashier of the Iron Bank in Falls Vil- 
lage, a position which he had very acceptably 
filled for four years, when he resigned in order 
to accept a similar position in the Meriden 
Bank. After remaining in that town for an 
equal length of time, he returned to the Iron 
Bank in Falls Village. In 1880 he was 
elected President of the bank, and he has held 
that ofiHce since. Thorough knowledge, care- 
ful judgment, and exceptional business abil- 
ity have characterized his administration, 
which must be largely credited with the pros- 
perity of the bank. 

In 1845 Mr. Randall was united in mar- 
riage to Minerva Northrop, daughter of Waite 
S. Northrop, of Brookfield, Conn. He has 
three children by the union, namely: Caro- 
line, wife of George W. Hall ; Lucy C. ; and 
George A. Mr. Randall has served as a mem- 
ber of the Board of Selectmen and as an 
Assessor. He is a member of Montgomery 
Lodge, No. 31, A. F. & A. M. 




ENJAMIN PLATT, of Thomaston, 
where for nearly forty years he was 
in the employ of the Seth Thomas 
Clock Company, was born in the town of 
Prospect, then Waterbury, Conn., on the anni- 
versary of Washington's Birthday, in 1806. 
His parents were Benjamin and Nancy (Bris- 
tol) Piatt, the former of whom was born in 
Old Milford, in 1782. 

His grandfather, who also bore the name of 
Benjamin Piatt, was a farmer. He fought on 
the side of his country in the Revolutionary 
War, and died fifty years of age. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Abigail Green, bore 
him eight children. His son, Benjamin Piatt, 



6o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was reared on the farm, and thereafter success- 
fully engaged in farming as an occupation. 
He died on his farm in Prospect on August 3, 
1870, eighty-eight years of age. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Nancy Bristol, was 
born in Milford in April, 1785, and reared 
him a family of twelve children. Of these, 
five are still living, namely: Benjamin Piatt; 
Delia, the widow of Luther Morse; Jane E. 
Piatt; John R. Piatt; and Mrs. Augusta Hall, 
a widow. Their mother spent her last days in 
Prospect, where she died at the age of eighty- 
two years. Both parents were consistent mem- 
bers of the Congregational church. 

Benjamin Piatt lived with his parents until 
he was twenty-two years of age, receiving a 
good practical education in the common 
schools of his native town. He then went to 
work in Waterbury, and for six years was en- 
gaged in driving a team from that place to 
New Haven. In the winter of 1831, while so 
employed, the harbor being frozen over, he 
made a tfip to New York, driving four horses, 
and upon his arrival in New York putting up 
at the Bull's Head Hotel, then the only public 
stopping-place in that part of the city. In 
1834 he removed to Thomaston, where he was 
engaged by the Seth Thomas Clock Company 
in a similar capacity, making trips for them 
to New Haven and Hartford, both of which 
places were about thirty miles distant. He 
did this for about twenty years, or until the 
construction of the railroad, after which he 
took a position in the packing-room of the 
company. He worked here until 1873, when 
he resigned, and has since for the most part 
lived a retired life. Although now eighty- 
nine years of age, for a man who has done so 
much hard work all his life he is remarkably 
well preserved, both physically and intel- 
lectually. 

He was married in 1838 to Miss Agnes 



Welton, of Hamilton, N.Y. , who was a daugh- 
ter of Willard Welton, a successful lawyer of 
that State. Toward the close of his life her 
father retired to a farm and still later removed 
to the village of Hamilton, where he died. 
He had nine children, of whom four are still 
living. Mr. and Mrs. Piatt have a son and 
daughter, namely: William B. , who, born in 
1 841, received a common-school education, en- 
tered the Fourteenth Regiment of the regular 
army, and afterward fell sick, and died in 
1863, twenty-two years of age; and Helen, who 
married Jonathan M. Peck, of Bristol, Conn., 
and has three children — Mary C. , Arthur B. 
(a civil engineer), and William Tracy. Her 
husband is a successful agriculturist. 

Mr. Piatt is a Republican in politics and 
has been prominent in town affairs. He 
served as a Representative to the legislature in 
1876 and in 1880, and was elected to the office 
of Selectman, but declined to serve. He has, 
however, acted as a member of the Board of 
Relief for many years. Mr. Piatt and his wife 
afe active and influential members of the Con- 
gregational church, and earnest workers in the 
Sunday-school, in which his wife has served as 
a teacher for several years. 




ENRV J. ALLEN, of Torrington, 
Sheriff of Litchfield County and a 
- V._^ leading man in his district, was 
born in Manchester, Conn., May 26, 1831, son 
of William and Hannah (Johnson) Allen, re- 
spectively natives of Hebron and New London. 
His grandfather, Hiram Allen, was engaged 
in agricultural pursuits in Hebron during 
the greater part of his life. He also taught 
school, winning the prominence and respect 
accorded to a capable instructor of youth. He 
lived to be sixty-two years of age, dying in 
Torrington. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



William Allen, father of Sheriff Allen, was 
a blacksmith by trade, and worked at the anvil 
in Hebron, Granby, Manchester, and New 
Britain, conducting a smithy in the latter 
town for thirty years. Late in life, retiring 
from active business, he moved to Torrington; 
and his last days were spent in East Haddam, 
where he died in 1890, at the age of eighty- 
eight. He was twice . married. His first 
wife, in maidenhood Hannah Johnson, was a 
daughter of David Johnson, a prominent farmer, 
who was well known in New London, Hebron, 
and Stamford. Mrs. Allen died in New Brit- 
ain at the age of fifty-eight, having been the 
mother of eight children, of whom the subject 
of this sketch is the only survivor. Mr. and 
Mrs. Allen were originally members of the 
Methodist church, but were converted to the 
doctrines of the Second Adventists. 

Henry J. Allen received his education in 
the common schools and the academy of New 
Britain. At .seventeen he opened a confec- 
tionery store in that town, and later was 
engaged in the confectionery business in 
Hartford and on North Main Street, Torring- 
ton. In 1851 he engaged as clerk in the hotel 
at New Britain; and in 1856, when it passed 
into the hands of a stock company, he was 
made superintendent. The following year he 
rented the house, but relinquished it the next 
year and engaged as clerk in the Massa.soit 
House in Chicago. He subsequently rented 
the Merchants' Hotel in New Haven, and in 
March, 1859, he purchased the hotel in Tor- 
rington now known as the Allen House. 
Among the improvements he has made in the 
building is the addition, in 1868, of two sto- 
ries, thereby enlarging it to four stories. His 
experience in the hotel business in different 
places had given him a broad knowledge of the 
requisites for success in catering to the public; 
and for the next twenty-five years the Allen 



House, under its genial and capable host, had 
a large patronage. In 1880, finding that other 
claims on his time interfered with his duties 
as manager of the hotel, he disposed of the 
business by letting the house, which is now 
conducted by Mr. Moulthrop. Mr. Allen has 
also been a successful auctioneer for thirty 
years, has dealt extensively in real estate, and 
for fourteen years has been in the insurance 
business, now representing the Mutual Life 
Insurance Company of New York, of which he 
is one of the most trusted agents. He was 
elected sheriff of the county in 1884, to serve 
three years, and has been re-elected each time 
since. In politics he is a Democrat, and he 
represented the district in the legislature in 
1878. He has also served as Town Constable 
ten years. Deputy Sheriff nine years, and reg- 
istrar of voters twenty-five years. In all he 
has been connected with the sheriff's oflfice 
twenty-three years. His executive ability is 
fully appreciated throughout the county. 

In 1853 Mr. Allen was united in marriage 
with Ellen, daughter of Augustus Robinson, 
-a shoemaker of New Britain. Her parents 
died at her husband's home, the father at 
eighty-four and the mother at eighty-two 
years. Mr. and Mrs. Allen are the parents of 
three children, as follows : Henry J., assistant 
at the jail in Litchfield, who married Mary 
Walling, of Irvington, and has four children — 
Emma, Daisy, Harry, and Ellen; Nelly H., 
who married Herman Huke, assistant superin- 
tendent of the Needle Company, and has one 
son, Allen; and Harriet B., who married Pro- 
fessor Charles T. Grilby, the well-known elo- 
cutionist and public reader of Boston, who is 
now studying oratory in Emerson College. 

Mr. Allen is active in Masonic work, having 
joined the order of A. F. & A. M. in New 
Britain in 1852, as a member of Harmony 
Lodge. In i860 he reorganized Seneca 



62 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Lodge, No. 55, of Torrington, it having been 
disbanded twenty-five years previously; and he 
was the first Master, holding the position for 
six years, and after an interim of two years for 
two years more. He is also a member of the 
Chapter here, and was formerly a member of 
Giddings Chapter, No. 20, of New Britain. 
Mr. Allen attends the Congregational church, 
of which his wife is a member. 



/^C 



EORGE S. ELMORE, a prominent 
Y^5| merchant of Litchfield, partner in 
the firm of Granniss & Elmore, was 
born in Winchester, Conn., April 29, 1856, 
son of George W. and Julia Ann (Johnson) 
Elmore. Mr. Elmore's grandfather, John 
Elmore, was a native of North Canaan, Conn. 
He became a prominent lawyer of Litchfield 
County, and practised his profession in the 
county courts for many years. He resided in 
North Canaan, where he died at the age 
of sixty-three. He married Phoebe Sterling, 
and she became the mother of six children, as 
follows: Sterling and John D., who are no 
longer living; Frederick W. ; Harriet D., 
who married Henry Drake ; George W. ; and 
Theodore. She died in Canaan in 1852. 
Both grandparents were members of the First 
Congregational Church. 

George W. Elmore, Mr. Elmore's father, 
was born in North Canaan, August 24, 1831. 
He learned the trade of a tanner and currier in 
Winchester, and was employed in these trades 
by the firm of Elmore, Drake & Co. Their 
business subsequently passed into the hands of 
his brothers, Sterling and John D. Elmore. 
In 1 861 he enlisted as a private in Company 
F, Twenty-eighth Regiment, Connecticut Vol- 
unteers, for nine months' service in the Civil 
War, and after serving thirteen months re- 
turned home in feeble health. Upon his re- 



covery he was employed at Rockwell's tannery 
in Winsted for four years, and then went to 
New York State, where he was engaged in the 
tanning business with his brother, John D. 
He later engaged in farming in Litchfield and 
the adjoining towns, and is at present residing 
in Litchfield. His wife, Julia Ann (John- 
son) Elmore, was a daughter of Sheldon and 
Sarah (Wells) Johnson. Her father, who was 
a native of Hartford, moved to Torrington, and 
there became prosperous in farming. He and 
his wife had six children. Mrs. George W. 
Elmore became the mother of eleven children, 
eight of whom are still living; namely, George 
S. , Ida, Hattie C. , Charles H., Addie L. , 
Theodore S. , Sarah E., and Ella D. Ida is 
the wife of M. M. Drake, Hattie C. married 
George Drake, Addie L. married James H. 
Bailey, and Sarah E. married Frank L. Leon- 
ard. Those who are deceased were: Sarah E. , 
who died aged six years; Eddie J., who died 
aged eight months; and James W. , who died 
in 1893, aged forty years. The mother's 
death occurred in Torrington, September 8, 
1892, aged fifty-eight years. Mr. Elmore's 
parents were Adventists. 

George S. Elmore resided with his parents 
until his father enlisted for the Civil War, at 
which time he went to live with an aunt, Mrs. 
Henry Drake. At the age of twelve years he 
commenced to work upon his grandfathers 
farm, attending school in the winter season. 
In 1872 he came to Litchfield; and after work- 
ing for Charles McNeil, a market gardener, for 
a year, he entered the employ of Charles B. 
Lane, who conducted a meat market, and with 
whom he remained four years. Mr. Lane was 
succeeded in business by A. L. Judd, but Mr. 
Elmore continued to work in the market under 
the new proprietor until 1880. He then 
formed a partnership with Mr. C. M. Ganung, 
and they purchased a bankrupt stock, with 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



63 



which they started in a general mercantile 
business. This firm continued in trade until 
1882, at which time the present partner, Mr. 
W. G. Granniss, bought Mr. Ganung's inter- 
est ; and the firm of Granniss & Elmore have 
since conducted a very successful business. 
They carry a complete line of groceries, crock- 
ery ware, dry goods, gentlemen's furnishings, 
carpets, and paper-hangings, and have acquired 
a reputation for being "square " and upright in 
their dealings. They are good buyers as well 
as sellers, and import goods when it is for 
their interest to do so. In 1888 their store 
was destroyed by fire, but they immediately 
built their present block, which stands upon 
the ground formerly occupied by the old dis- 
trict school, which they purchased of the town. 
The present building is seventy-five by fifty- 
nine, with an extension twenty-five feet by 
nineteen. It is located at 44 West Main 
Street, one of the finest business positions in 
town. 

Mr. Elmore is a Republican in politics, and 
has served upon the Board of Burgesses for two 
years. He is a charter member of the Lodge 
of Ancient Order of United Workmen, and of 
the Order of United American Mechanics, 
being an ex- Councillor of the latter and Mas- 
ter of the former lodge ; and he is Financial 
Reporter of the Lodge of Knights of Honor in 
Litchfield. He is also a Past Master of the 
Workmen's Association of Connecticut and of 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and 
was a delegate to the Grand Lodge in 1893 
and 1895. He was one of the first members 
of the Litchfield Fire Company, and is to-day 
closely identified with that organization. 

On May 21, 1879, Mr. Elmore was united 
in marriage to Nellie R. Peck, of Litchfield. 
She was born November 11, 1858, daughter of 
Charles J. and Julia A. (Bradley) Peck, the 
former of whom was an old resident of Litch- 



field. Mrs. Elmore's grandfather, Horace 
Peck, was a prosperous farmer of Litchfield, 
who died at the age of seventy years. He 
married Lydia Orton ; and she became the 
mother of four children, of whom Charles J., 
Mrs. Elmore's father, was the eldest. Charles 
J. Peck was born in Litchfield, and was reared 
to agricultural pursuits. He was also engaged 
in the wholesale butchering business, which 
he followed successfully for some years. He 
died in 1885, aged sixty-four years. His 
wife, Julia A. Bradley, was born in Litchfield, 
November 3, 1825, daughter of John R. and 
Julia A. (Roberts) Bradley. John R. Bradley 
was a lifelong resident of South Farms, now 
called Morris, where he followed farming with 
success. Mrs. Elmore's grandmother, who 
was born June 3, 1802, became the mother of 
nine children, of whom Mrs. Elmore's mother 
was the eldest, and died February 3, i860. 
Mrs. Charles J. Peck was the mother of six 
children, as follows: Lydia J., who died at the 
age of sixteen;- Edwin B. , a butcher of Litch- 
field; Ella A., wife of William H. Cypher, of 
Worcester, Mass. ; Julia A., wife of Marvin 
S. Todd, Jr., of Litchfield; Charles E., who 
formerly resided upon the old homestead, and 
died at the age of thirty-four years; and Nel- 
lie R., who is now Mrs. Elmore. She was a 
member of the Congregational church, and 
died at the age of sixty-five years. Mr. and 
Mrs. Elmore have two children, namely: 
George Orton, who was born December 12, 
1881; and Paul Bradley, born January 22, 
1885. Mr. and Mrs. Elmore attend the Con- 
gregational church, Mrs. Elmore being a mem- 
ber. Mr. Elmore's business career has been 
marked by a degree of energy and perseverance 
that easily accounts for his success. He, how- 
ever, credits it in a large measure to the 
timely assistance of Mr. Samuel G. Beach, a 
prominent citizen of Litchfield, who owned the 



64 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



block in which Mr. Elmore first established 
himself in trade. 



M 



WIGHT C. KILBOURN, a well- 
known resident of Litchfield, Conn., 
Clerk of the Superior Court of Litch- 
field County, was born in this town, October 9, 
1837. He is the son of William P. and Caro- 
line A. (Canfield) Kilbourn, and a descendant 
of early settlers of Connecticut. 

Thomas Kilbourn, who came with his fam- 
ily from Wood Ditton, in the County of 
Cambridge, England, arrived on the ship "In- 
crease" in 1635, and settled in Wethersfield, 
where he died prior to 1639. His descendants 
have filled with honor various positions in our 
national history, and some of them have be- 
come quite prominent. Among them may be 
mentioned Jonathan Law, LL. D., Governor of 
Connecticut in 1741-50; Benjamin Silliman, 
the distinguished scientist; James Kilbourn, 
one of the pioneers of Ohio; Byron Kilbourn, 
the developer of the railroads in the North- 
west; Payne Kenyon Kilbourn, a distin- 
guished genealogist and historian. Thomas 
Kilbourn's grandsons, Joseph and Abraham, 
settled in Litchfield about 1721, and from 
them a large posterity descended; and all have 
been esteemed and reliable citizens. In 1854 a 
family meeting was held in Litchfield, at which 
over five hundred descendants were present. 

Abraham Kilbourn, son of John and grandson 
of Thomas, the immigrant, was born in Wethers- 
field, and was the first of the family to settle 
in the town of Litchfield, being among its 
earliest inhabitants. He was a fuller by occu- 
pation, and conducted a mill at what is now 
the village of Bantam, but which was then 
known as Bradleyville. His descendants in 
direct line to Dwight C. Kilbourn were all 
natives and lifelong residents of Litchfield. 



The next in line after Abraham was Jesse. 
He was a farmer, and was the father of Jacob, 
who was a farmer and currier, and served as 
Tax Collector and first Constable for many 
years. Jacob's son, Norman, was the grand- 
father of the subject of this sketch. He had 
a large family, of which William P. was one 
of the older members. 

William P. Kilbourn, father of Dwight C, 
was born in the village of Bradleyville, town 
and county of Litchfield, Conn., in 181 1. In 
early manhood he acquired a knowledge of the 
carpenter's and wheelwright's trades, which 
he followed in this county, making his home 
in Bradleyville. He was a good mechanic, 
and besides working at his regular trades was 
often engaged to put machinery into mills of 
various kinds. He had a wide reputation as 
an excellent workman, and built the early 
manufactories in Thomaston in this county. 
His death occurred in Litchfield, in Novem- 
ber, 1894, at the advanced age of eighty-two. 
Llis wife, Caroline A. Canfield, was a daugh- 
ter of Nathaniel Canfield, a clothier, born in 
Remsen, N. Y., and was one of a large family. 
Her mother, formerly Urania Green, was a 
cousin of Chief Justice Church, of Connecti- 
cut. Mr. and Mrs. William P. Kilbourn 
reared two children, namely: Dwight C, 
whose name appears at the head of this sketch ; 
and Jane, who married Andrew D. Smith, a 
successful and prominent farmer of the town of 
Litchfield. The mother died in November, 
1894, within five days of her husband, aged 
eighty-one years, having well fulfilled her part 
in life. She was a member of the Baptist 
church. 

Dwight C. Kilbourn attended the common 
schools of his native town, supplementing his 
studies by attendance at the normal school 
during the winters. He remained in Litch- 
field until the age of twenty-one, and was 




DWIGHT C. KILBOURN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



67 



engaged for some time in teaching. On at- 
taining his majority he went to Ohio and 
taught school at College Hill, not far from 
Cincinnati, remaining there some three years, 
and benefiting by a course of private instruc- 
tion during this period. In i860 he returned 
home and began the study of law with Origen 
S. Seymour, afterward Chief Justice of the 
Supreme Court of Connecticut. Soon after 
the breaking out of the Civil War he relin- 
quished his studies for a time and enlisted in 
Company A, Second Connecticut Heavy Artil- 
lery. He saw active service under Grant and 
Sheridan, taking part in the famous Shenan- 
doah Valley campaign. He was wounded 
while in the discharge of duty at the battle of 
Opequan, and sent to the hospital, after his 
recovery receiving promotion to the rank of 
First Lieutenant. Toward the close of the 
war he had charge of a detachment engaged on 
the fortifications around Washington and Alex- 
andria, and dismantled several forts. Having 
been honorably discharged after three years of 
service, he came back to Litchfield and re- 
sumed his study of the law, being admitted to 
the bar in 1866. Going to New York City he 
remained a short time engaged in the practice 
of his profession, but soon took advantage of 
a favorable offer to accept a position as travel- 
ling salesman in Pennsylvania and the Middle 
States. After some practical experience on 
the road he engaged in the mercantile business 
in East Litchfield, and was variously occupied, 
holding the position of station agent for nine- 
teen years, also practising law for some time 
in company with Chief Justice Andrews, and 
later independently, until 1887, when he was 
burned out and lost a valuable library. 

In 1888 he was appointed Clerk of the Supe- 
rior Court of Litchfield County, which position 
he has ably filled to the present time. He is 
also prominent in educational affairs, having 



been secretary of the School Board for twenty 
years. He is Commander of the Seth F. 
Plumb Post, Grand Army of the Republic; 
Secretary of the Second Artillery Veteran 
Association ; and President of the Veterans' 
State Association. He is also a member of 
the Army and Navy Club. In the Masonic 
Order he is a member of St. Paul's Lodge, No. 
II, A. F. & A. M., and Darius Chapter, No. 
16. In politics he is a Republican. 

Mr. Kilbourn was married July 5, 1866, to 
Sarah M. Hopkins, a daughter of Edward 
Hopkins, a well-known citizen, who died in 
this town at the age of eighty years. On the 
maternal side Mrs. Kilbourn is descended from 
Joseph Harris, one of the earliest settlers of 
Litchfield. She is a member of the Congre- 
gational church. 

Mr. Kilbourn is a gentleman of cultivated 
mind and wide intelligence. He takes much 
interest in historical and genealogical matters, 
and, having at his command a large fund of 
valuable information, has come to be recog- 
nized as an authority on these subjects. In 
1881 he delivered the historical address at 
Litchfield, on the occasion of the centennial 
celebration of St. Paul's Lodge, No. 11, 
A. F. & A. M. In religion Mr. Kilbourn is 
of the liberal faith. His personal character is 
above reproach, his conduct in the affairs of 
every-day life being so guided as to win the 
respect of those whose good opinion is most to 
be desired. Both he and his wife are promi- 
nent in the best society of Litchfield. 

A portrait of this influential citizen is 
placed on a preceding page. 




|LISHA J. STEELE, superintendent of 
the wire rod and tubing department of 
the Coe Brass Manufacturing Com- 
pany, of Torrington, was born in this town 



68 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



June 29, 1843, a son of William S. Steele, a 
native of Derby, New Haven County. His 
grandfather, Norman Steele, was a well-to-do 
manufacturer of New Haven County, and, pre- 
sumably, spent the entire forty-two years of 
his life in the town of Derby. He married 
Hannah Spencer, who bore him seven chil- 
dren, none of whom are now living. 

William S. Steele, the father of Elisha J. 
Steele, was educated and reared to manhood in 
the village of Waterbury. There he learned 
the trade of soldering brass, and for many 
years followed that occupation in the button 
factory. In 1838 he removed to Torrington, 
then called Wolcottville, and went to work as 
a button solderer in the manufactory of Wad- 
hams & Webster. In this employment he rose 
to the position of superintendent of the works, 
which in time became one of the most promi- 
nent establishments in the place. He worked 
here until his decease, at the age of forty-two 
years. William S. Steele had much natural 
ability, was a clever mechanic, and a man of 
considerable executive force. He also pos- 
sessed a fine musical taste, took much interest 
in musical enterprises, and was for ten years 
chorister at the Third Congregational Church. 
He was also influential in religious work, 
and widely and favorably known in political 
circles, having been one of the founders of the 
Republican party. His wife, in maidenhood 
Caroline Jones, was the daughter of Darius 
Jones, of Cheshire, New Haven County. Mr. 
Jones was a farmer by occupation, and spent 
his entire life in Cheshire, dying at the good 
old age of seventy-five years. He married 
Abigail Bristol, a native of Wallingford, who 
had one other child besides Caroline. She 
was the mother of seven children, three still 
living, namely: Abigail, wife of Florimand 
D. Fyler; Elisha J. ; and George B. She 
.survived her husband, spending her last days at 



Torrington. Both she and her husband were 
prominent members of the Third Congregational 
Church, and very active in denominational work. 

Elisha J. Steele began working with his 
father in the button factory when a boy of 
twelve years. Subsequently he took up the 
papier-mache business, and was employed 
thereat when the Civil War began. At the 
first war meeting held in this town his was 
the first name enrolled of those of the eleven 
men who enlisted at that time. He became 
a member of Company I, Fourth Connecticut 
Volunteer Infantry, subsequently changed to 
the First Connecticut Heavy Artillery, and 
served as a private four years and three 
months. His regiment was one of the best 
organized and commanded of any in the State, 
and won a grand record for bravery and fidel- 
ity. Mr. Steele participated in many engage- 
ments. He served all through the Peninsular 
campaign, including the siege of Yorktown, 
was with Grant in the engagements before 
Richmond and Petersburg, and assisted in the 
defence of Washington. After his discharge 
at New Haven, August 12, 1865, Mr. Steele 
went back to his native town and entered the 
employment of Turner & Clark, of the Sey- 
mour Manufacturing Company. He worked 
for this firm until 1875, when he engaged with 
the Coe Brass Company as superintendent of 
the press department. F"rom this position 
after four years he was promoted to the super- 
intendency of the wire and rod department, 
and in 1889 he was given the additional 
responsibility of directing the brazed and 
seamless tube department. In these capacities 
he has control of about three hundred men. 

In January, 1864, Mr. Steele was united in 
marriage with Sophia H. Skiff, the daughter 
of Nathan and Adelia (Milliard) Skiff, suc- 
cessful farming people of this county. Of this 
union four children have been born; namely. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



69 



Jennie A., Abbie A., William S., and Annie 
A. Abbie A. died at the age of two years. 
The eldest daughter, a cultured and highly 
accomplished young lady, received her educa- 
tion at the New England Conservatory of 
Music in Boston, is now a most successful 
teacher in the public schools of this town, and 
has also taught music in the schools of West- 
field, Mass. William S. is a graduate of the 
Torrington High School, and Annie is still 
attending school. 

In politics Mr. Steele is a Republican ; and 
during the legislative session of 1887 and 1888 
he served his constituents with credit in the 
legislature, having been chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Appropriations, besides taking a 
prominent part in the discussions of the 
House. For the past ten years he was chair- 
man of the town Republican Committee, and 
for six years he was chairman of the Board of 
Education. In 1890 he was appointed one of 
a special commission to attend the centennial 
celebration of the settling up of the Western 
Reserve in Ohio. He is prominently identified 
with the Grand Army of the Republic, being 
Junior Vice-Commander, and ex-Commander 
of the Steele Post, named in memory of his 
brother, who was killed at Petersburg. In 
1 891 Mr. Steele was an aide on the staff of 
General Russell A. Alger, and in 1876 he was 
one of a committee of three appointed to erect 
a monument in memory of the brave soldiers 
of Torrington who lost their lives in fighting 
for the nation's honor. He is a charter mem- 
ber of the Knights of Honor, and has served as 
treasurer since its organization eleven years 
ago. Mr. Steele is President of the Republi- 
can Club of Torrington, and was chosen as 
delegate at large to the National Convention 
held at Cleveland in June, 1895. He also be- 
longs to the Army and Navy Club of Connecti- 
cut, and is a member of the Savings Bank 



Corporation. On Decoration Day. each year 
it has long been his practice to see that a flag 
is placed upon every soldier's grave, which he 
alone, of all the members of the post, can 
locate with certainty. He and his family are 
members of the Third Congregational Church ; 
and he is now chairman of the society com- 
mittee, has been leader of the choir, and was 
superintendent of the Sunday-school for eight 
years. He is likewise a leader and hard 
worker in the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion, was one of its principal organizers, is 
chairman of the Committee on Finance, and 
has been a Director since its inception. Mrs. 
Steele takes an earnest interest in all religious 
work, and has held the office of President of 
the Ladies' Aid Society. 




EV. HIRAM STONE, rector of St. 
Paul's Episcopal Church at Bantam, 
in the town of Litchfield, and of 
Trinity Church, of Milton, same town, was 
early imbued with a deeply religious spirit, 
and was naturally endowed with the gifts that 
have made him a teacher and a leader of men. 
He is a native of Litchfield, born July 25, 
1824, a son of Russell Stone, who was born in 
this town, November 26, 1798. Mr. Stone is 
descended from one of the early settlers of the 
historic town of Guilford, Conn. — the town 
from which have originated so many of the dis- 
tinguished men of this and past generations. 
His ancestral history is traced back to one, 
the Rev. Samuel Stone, who was born in 1585, 
and doubtless spent his life in England. 

William Stone, son of the Rev. Samuel 
Stone, born in 1610, was the migrating ances- 
tor, coming to the United States in 1639, 
mayhap with the Rev. Henry Whitfield's little 
flock, as he located in Guilford in the same 
year, making that his home unti.l his death, 



7° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in 1683. He was a tiller of the soil; and his 
descendants for several generations were horny- 
handed sons of toil, gaining their subsistence 
by the sweat of their brows from the produc- 
tions of the earth. Thomas Stone, the pa- 
ternal grandfather of the Rev. Hiram Stone, 
was born September 21, 1755, in Guilford, son 
of Thomas Stone, Sr., who spent his life in 
that town, having been born in 1731, and 
dying in 1778. Grandfather Stone was reared 
to agricultural life, and was one of the brave 
farmers who fought in the Revolution, for 
which service he afterward received a pension. 
He subsequently settled in this town, buying a 
house on Prospect Mountain, where he died at 
the venerable age of eighty-eight years. He was 
twice married, reared four children by his first 
wife and six by his second wife, the maiden 
name of the latter being Polly Parmalee. 

Russell Stone, who was born in the closing 
years of the last century, early learned the 
trade of a blacksmith, and followed that occu- 
pation in Bantam until his decease, at the 
comparatively early age of thirty-six years. 
He formed a matrimonial alliance with Lucia 
Palmer, the daughter of John Palmer, formerly 
superintendent of the rolling-mills in Litch- 
field, where he died at an advanced age. She 
was one of a family of nine children, and was 
descended from Puritan stock, the first mem- 
ber of the family to come to this country hav- 
ing been one Walter Palmer, who landed in 
Salem, Mass., in 1629. The mother, who 
was born August 9, 1802, died in Waterbury, 
Conn., September 23, 1842, having survived 
her husband several years, he having preceded 
her to the grave July 25, 1834, the tenth anni- 
versary of the birth of his only son, Hiram 
Stone. They were the parents of but two 
children, the other, Louisa, being now dead. 
The Rev. Hiram Stone made his home with 
his mother during her lifetime, and acquired | 



the rudiments of his education in the district 
schools and at select schools in this locality. 
He began his professional career as a teacher. 
In 1849, being desirous of further mental 
training and higher attainments in learning, 
that he might be fitted for a clerical position, 
Mr. Stone began studying with a private tutor, 
and in 1851 was admitted as a candidate for 
orders. After pursuing his studies still 
further at the Berkeley Divinity School for 
two years he was ordained to the ministry, and 
was appointed to his first charge in 1854 at St. 
John's Church in Essex. Two years later Mr. 
Stone went to Kansas, there being a wide 
field for missionary work in that new country, 
and for three years labored in the Master's 
cause in Leavenworth, then a border town. 
His efforts were rewarded, being attended by 
a great awakening; and under his charge the 
first Episcopal church between there and the 
Rocky Mountains was organized. In 1859 he 
accepted an appointment from the government 
as chaplain at Fort Leavenworth, and during 
the eight years he labored with the soldier 
boys his ministry was fraught with good work. 
He was then sent to Fort Sully, Dak., going 
thence to Fort Totten, Benson County, and, 
after a year's ministry, administered to Fort 
Wadsworth in the same State. In 1876, hav- 
ing spent sixteen years in army life on the 
Western frontier, Mr. Stone tendered his res- 
ignation to the government and returned to the 
town which gave him birth. Since that time 
he has been engaged in pastoral work in this 
locality, having been settled over St. Paul's 
Church for a longer period of time than any 
other minister of his denomination in Litch- 
field County. Without thought of self, and 
with the true and humble spirit of the Master, 
he has labored faithfully in his chosen calling, 
and has been rewarded by the large increase in 
the membership of his church, which now 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



71 



numbers twofold as many communicants as 
when he came here. 

On September 10, 1855, Mr. Stone was 
united in wedlock with Wealthy A. Lewis, 
one of nine children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Augustus Lewis, prosperous farming people of 
Haddam. Of this happy union two children 
have been born, Lewis H. and Carrie Louisa. 
Lewis H., whose birth occurred October 5, 
1866, was educated at Trinity College, Hart- 
ford, and subsequently was graduated from the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons in New 
York City. In 1890 he was appointed sur- 
geon in the United States Navy, and has been 
promoted at different times. Now, after hav- 
ing travelled extensively, he is located at 
Montevideo, South America. Carrie Louisa, 
born September 28, 1869, was educated at St. 
Margaret's School in Waterbury, Conn. She 
married John Brock, of Pittsburg, a public 
ofificial; and they have two children, Marie 
L. and Gertrude Stone Brock. The first wife 
of Mr. Stone died at the age of forty-one 
years. She was a woman of tried and true 
character, nobly assisted him in his Christian 
labors, and was a devout member of the Epis- 
copal church. He subsequently married Mrs. 
Sarah (Aldridge) Phelps, the daughter of 
Charles Aldridge, and the widow of the late 
George Phelps. Mr. Stone, who is every- 
where esteemed, being popular outside of his 
church relations, is a most genial and pleasant 
man, whose influence for good is universally 
recognized, and whose friends number legion. 
He is connected with the Seth F. Plumb Post, 
Grand Army of the Republic, being its 
chaplain. 



frX re: 



LFRED C. HOPKINS, a respected 
resident of Torrington and agent of 
the United States Express Com- 
pany, was born in Northfield, Conn., April 8, 



i860, son of Joseph and Delia (Atwood) Hop- 
kins. His grandfather, Edward Hopkins, 
lived in his early manhood in Campville, 
Conn., where he was successfully engaged in 
the manufacture of wooden clocks. He after- 
ward settled on a farm in Northfield, where he 
engaged in agriculture with profit, spending the 
remainder of his life in that occupation. He 
took an active part in the affairs of the town 
and the church, always solicitous for the pub- 
lic good. He died in Northfield in the year 
1876. 

Joseph Hopkins was born in Northfield, 
where he grew to manhood on the old home- 
stead, assisting his father in carrying on the 
farm. Having acquired a good practical edu- 
cation in the common schools, he and a brother 
were successful teachers in that locality for 
several years. After Joseph Hopkins became 
of age he engaged in a mercantile life in 
Plainville, where he conducted a successful 
business until 1862. Then he sold out and 
returned to the old homestead, where he has 
since lived and prospered as a farmer. He 
takes an active interest in all matters that con- 
cern the welfare of his town, and has served 
most acceptably in several of the town offices. 
His wife, Delia (Atwood) Hopkins, is a native 
of Watertown, Conn., and a daughter of David 
Atwood. Her father was profitably engaged 
in farming during the greater part of his life. 
She bore her husband five children, of whom 
three sons still survive, namely: Alfred C, 
subject of this sketch; Elbert, residing at 
home on the farm; and Joseph, who is attend- 
ing college at Ashburnham, Mass. Both par- 
ents are communicants of the Congregational 
church, in which the father has served as 
Deacon for many years. 

Alfred C. Hopkins received his early edu- 
cation by attending the common schools of 
Northfield, and later a school at Thomaston, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Conn. He remained at home with his father 
until he attained his majority. He then came 
to Torrington, where he secured a position as 
shipping clerli in the wood department of the 
Union Hardware Company. Later on he was 
employed in the needle factory, where he re- 
mained about two years. For the two succeed- 
ing years he was engaged as a contractor in 
Mount Carmel, Conn., from which place he 
removed to Morris, Conn., where he pur- 
chased a farm at the south end of Bantam 
Lake. Here, besides farming, he engaged in 
a boating business, which he conducted for 
five years. In 1888 he returned to Torrington 
and was employed in the needle shop up to 
January i, 1890, when he embarked in general 
trucking and expressing, purchasing the inter- 
est and outfit of Robert Stone. His predeces- 
sor employed but two horses. He has since so 
increased the business that he keeps fifteen 
horses for its needs, and hires from six to 
eight. Throughout the busy season he keeps 
ten or twelve double trucks employed. He 
also takes contracts for grading, cellar excava- 
tion, and sirpilar work. At the age of twenty- 
one years, in August of 1881, Mr. Hopkins 
was joined in marriage with Miss Georgiana 
Staples, only daughter of Edson and Mary 
(Thompkins) Staples, of Litchfield, where 
the former was engaged in the business of a 
carriage-maker for many years. A paternal 
uncle of Mrs. Hopkins was a well-known and 
extensive hat manufacturer in Danbury, Conn., 
for many years. Her mother died when she 
was but three years of age. Mr. Staples after- 
ward made a second marriage, and of this 
union four children were born. 

Following the example of previous genera- 
tions of his family, Mr. Hopkins is a Republi- 
can. He is a well-known member of the 
Knights of Pythias and of the Order of Red 
Men, in both of which he has held office. He 




business 
March i, 



and his estimable wife are active and influen- 
tial members of the Congregational church and 
Sunday-school. Mrs. Hopkins is connected 
with several of the societies of the church. 
They reside at their pleasant home at 57 Pros- 
pect Street. 

IDNEY P. ENSIGN, Secretary of 
the Barnum, Richardson Company 
of Lime Rock and a well-known 
man, was born in Canaan, Conn., 
1834, son of Sidney and Clarinda 
(Prentice) Ensign. His grandfather, Ely 
Ensign, who was a native of Litchfield 
County, was a farmer, and spent his life in 
Canaan. He married Lucy Dean, and they 
reared five children; namely, Sidney, John 
E., Lee, Harriet, and Martha. Sidney En- 
sign, Sr., was born in Canaan; and there, too, 
his life was spent. He was a woollen manu- 
facturer and fairly well-to-do. He lived to 
be eighty-seven years of age. His wife, who 
was the daughter of the Rev. Charles Pren- 
tice, of Canaan, died at forty-five. They also 
reared five children: Sidney P., Charles L., 
Ely, Martha, and Theodore. 

Sidney P. Ensign entered the business 
world as an office boy. This was beginning 
at the bottom, an event to which he is in- 
debted for much valuable experience. In 
1857 he entered the employ of the Barnum, 
Richardson Company, manufacturers. He 
was book-keeper for some time, and later 
travelling agent. In 1864 he became a stock- 
holder, and was subsequently made secretary. 
For the past thirty years he has been closely 
identified with the interests of the company, 
which has a flourishing business, and is well 
known throughout the locality. Much of its 
success is attributable to the good judgment 
and business ability of its secretary. 

In 1859 M''- Ensign was united in marriage 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



73 



to Jane E., daughter of Alexander Belcher, 
of Salisbury; and three children blessed their 
union. These were: Clarinda, wife of Erving 
R. Fenton, of Lime Rock; Harriet; and Lucy. 
In politics Mr. Ensign is a Democrat and 
very active in the interests of his party. He 
was a Representative to the legislature in 
1871, a State Senator in the sessions of 1891 
and 1893, and has served on the State Central 
Committee for twenty years or more. The 
family have a pleasant home at Lime Rock, 
and are numbered among the most valued resi- 
dents of the town. 



/^^TeORGE H. hunt, a feed merchant 
\Pj^ and farmer of Litchfield and a repre- 
sentative business man of the town, 
is a native of Alfreton, County Derby, Eng- 
land, born May 22, 1857. His grandfather, 
John Hunt, was born at South Wingfield, 
England. He was a teacher of distinction 
during his years of -activity, and having 
rounded out a full period of years passed away 
at an advanced age in the parish of Alfreton. 
Mr. Hunt's father, Joseph Hunt, a lifelong- 
resident of the same place, was born Septem- 
ber 29, 1813, and died there in 1888. He was 
a tiller of the soil, and married Mary Ann 
Slack, the daughter of a farmer in South 
Wingfield, a town adjoining Alfreton. She 
was born in 1815, and died at the family 
home in Alfreton in 1892. She reared six 
children, namely: Ellen; Harriet, who died 
at the age of twenty-one years; Joseph; James 
S. ; Mary Ann; and George H., the subject 
of this brief personal record. The parents 
were people of some note in their native town 
and esteemed members of the Church of Eng- 
land. 

George H. Hunt spent his early years in 
England, attending private schools until fif- 



teen years old, when he entered a law ofifice as 
a clerk, a position which he retained eight 
years. Returning then to the parental roof,, 
he assisted his father on the farm one year, 
and then came to America. He landed in 
New York City in 1881, and on the 13th of 
May made his appearance in Litchfield. On 
the first day of the following June he entered 
the employment of F. R. Starr, on what is 
now known as Echo Farm. Three months 
later this property was purchased by a stock 
company, and for nearly eight years thereafter 
Mr. Hunt was secretary of the company. 
Resigning his position, he bought from the 
Echo Farm Company their feed business, took 
a lease of their mills, and has since conducted 
a successful business. In 1895 Mr. Hunt 
invested some of his surplus money in land, 
purchasing the Moulthrop farm, containing 
one hundred and thirty-five acres of choice 
land. This he devotes to dairying purposes. 
He keeps a herd of twenty fine graded cows, 
besides young stock, and sells pure, unadul- 
terated milk. 

In 1886 Mr. Hunt was united in the bonds 
of matrimony with Elizabeth Williamson, a 
native of Litchfield, daughter of John F. and 
Elizabeth H. (Wheeler) Williamson. Her 
father was a native of Scotland, born near Ed- 
inburgh, where he was reared and educated. 
From there he went to South Carolina, thence 
to New York State, and later to Connecti- 
cut, locating in this town, where he spent 
his remaining days. Mrs. Williamson, the 
mother of Mrs. Hunt, was a daughter of 
Christopher Wheeler, a native of Stoning- 
ton, Conn., where his father, Lester Wheeler, 
was a lifelong farmer. Christopher, who was 
engaged in agriculture during his younger 
years, removed to Litchfield after his mar- 
riage, and bought a farm about three miles 
west of the village, where he carried on mixed 



74 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



husbandry until his decease, at the age of 
threescore years. He married Amanda Gal- 
lup, who was born at Groton, near Stonington, 
a daughter of Ebenezer Gallup. She bore her 
husband eight children, three of whom are 
still living, namely: Charles D., a farmer in 
this town; Elizabeth, mother of Mrs. Hunt; 
and Mary J., the wife of Jacob Morse, of 
Torrington. Mr. Morse occupied a prominent 
position among the influential men of this 
locality, and for twenty-three years was one of 
the Selectmen, having served on the first 
board elected in Litchfield, and also repre- 
sented his fell6w-townsmen in the legislature. 
His father, who lived to the age of seventy 
years, was likewise a member of the legislat- 
ure during one term. Mrs. Williamson, who 
was born in 1823, is now making her home 
with her son-in-law, Mr. Hunt, and is a re- 
markably bright and active woman. Of the 
union of Mr. and Mrs. Hunt two children have 
been born, Philip W. and Fernie W. Mr. 
Hunt is an adherent of the Democratic party, 
and has served as Assessor one year. He is 
a man of financial standing and a Director in 
the Echo Farm Company. He joined the 
Order of Odd Fellows in England, and is now 
a member of St. Paul's Lodge, No. 11, A. F. 
& A. M., of Litchfield, of Darius Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons, and of Buel Council. 
He was reared in the Episcopalian faith, but 
is now an attendant of the Methodist church, 
of which Mrs. Hunt is a communicant. 



/p5Yo 



EORGE W. COWDREY, whose por- 
\^J_ trait appears on the opposite page, is 
the General Manager of the Barnum, 
Richardson Company's works in Canaan, 
Litchfield County, Conn. He was born in 
Ithaca, N.Y., April 15, 1844, and is the only 
child reared by his parents, Chauncey and 



Emeline (Davis) Cowdrey. Mr. Cowdrey's 
father died on August 20, 1895, having 
reached the advanced age of eighty - nine 
years. He was for many years engaged in 
the manufacturing of carriages in Ithaca, but 
had retired from active business pursuits sev- 
eral years before his death. Chauncey Cow- 
drey's wife, Emeline Davis, was a daughter 
of Sheldon Davis. 

George W. Cowdrey received a good educa- 
tion, and at the age of seventeen commenced 
life for himself as a clerk. He remained in 
that capacity for a year, and after filling a 
position as a book-keeper for a similar length 
of time became connected with the Barnum, 
Richardson Company of Canaan. He has 
been with that concern for the past thirty-two 
years, and is now a stockholder in the com- 
pany, a Director, and General Manager of the 
works in Canaan. In the last-named capac- 
ity, in which he has served for ten years, 
Mr. Cowdrey has displayed unusual business 
ability and rare judgment. 

In politics a Democrat, he was elected to 
the legislature in 1872, to represent the town 
of North Canaan. In 1868 Mr. Cowdrey was 
united in marriage to Irene Adam, the daugh- 
ter of Forbes S. Adam, an old resident of 
Canaan. Mr. and Mrs. Cowdrey have one 
son, George W., Jr., who is employed in the 
office of the Barnum, Richardson Company. 

The prosperous business career of Mr. Cow- 
drey happily illustrates the efificiency of con- 
centration of effort and perseverance in one's 
chosen course of action. As the author of 
"Self-help" has well said: "The great high- 
road of human welfare lies along the old high- 
way of steadfast well-doing; and they who are 
the most persistent, and work in the truest 
spirit, will invariably be the most successful. 
Success treads on the heels of every right 
effort." 




GEORGE W. COWDREY. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



77 



W- 



ALTER S. LEWIS, the oldest and 
most prominent merchant in Tor- 
rington, Conn., was born in New 
Haven, February 21, 1833, son of Charles 
and Elizabeth (Bradley) Lewis, respectively 
natives of New Haven and East Haven. The 
Lewis family is of Welsh origin. The grand- 
father, Charles Lewis, who was a farmer in 
Southington, Conn., where other members of 
the family settled at an early date, spent most 
of his active life in that town, passing his 
last years practically retired in New Haven, 
where he died at the age of ninety-seven in 
1868. 

Charles Lewis, the father of Walter S., 
followed the sea for a livelihood, as captain of 
a coasting-vessel. He also retired to New 
Haven in his old age, and died there in his 
seventy-third year. He was three times mar- 
ried. His first wife, who was a member of 
the large family of William Bradley, of East 
Haven, died in New Haven at the age of 
thirty -four. She was the mother of four chil- 
dren, two of whom are living, namely: 
Henry, a bit manufacturer in New Meriden ; 
and Walter S. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis were 
members of the Congregational church. 

Walter S. Lewis, left motherless when four 
years of age, was taken charge of by his grand- 
father. He received a good education, attend- 
ing the city schools and studying at the 
Lancastrian School of John E. Lowell. In 
December, 1849, when he was sixteen years of 
age, he went to work as a clerk for A. G. 
Bradford, of Torrington, who kept a country 
store, remaining five years. In 1855 with a 
partner he started a general store. At that 
time Torrington was only a small village, 
with few stores and little competition. After 
spending ten years conducting this establish- 
ment, he opened a small general store near 
the Allen House, later removing to the gran- 



ite building, where he was five years. He 
then moved into the building which he 
now occupies, a two-story structure, one hun- 
dred and twenty-five feet deep and forty-five 
feet wide, specially erected by him to meet 
the demands of his business. When he first 
opened here, he had a fine stock of groceries, 
dry goods, clothing, boots and shoes, and no- 
tions; but in 1 891 he disposed of all but the 
dry goods, of which he now keeps a complete 
stock, together with a first-class line of car- 
pets, buying direct from the New York and 
Boston markets. Mr. Lewis has been in busi- 
ness forty years, and is consequently the old- 
est merchant in the town, while one of the 
oldest in the county. He has seen Torring- 
ton grow from a small village to a flourishing 
manufacturing place. His business has kept 
pace with Torrington, holding its own through 
many changes and' entitling him to be ranked 
among the leading merchants of the place, 
though the number of his competitors is 
yearly increasing. His store is, perhaps, the 
finest in the town and one of the largest and 
finest in that part of the State. Mr. Lewis is 
also a stockholder and Director of the Needle 
Company and of the Electric Light Company, 
a stockholder of the Torrington Water Com- 
pany, the Union Hardware Company, and the 
Eagle Bicycle Company. 

On November 29, 1855, Mr. Lewis was 
united in marriage with Mary J. Wooding, of 
Torrington. Her father, who was a farmer in 
Torrington, died at the age of seventy-four. 
His wife, who was a native of New Hartford, 
died at the home of her daughter, aged sev- 
enty-six years. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis had two 
children, Lizzie W. and Charles, both of 
whom received a liberal education. The for- 
mer attended the seminaries at Rye and Pitts- 
field. She is now the wife of William Mertz, 
who assists in her father's store. Charles 



78 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Lewis attended the Cheshire Military Acad- 
emy and a commercial school at Poughkeepsie, 
N.Y. He is employed in his father's estab- 
lishment. In politics Mr. Lewis is a Demo- 
crat. He has always been actively interested 
in the growth of the town, and has filled many 
offices, serving for some time as Warden of 
the borough. In religious belief he is a Con- 
gregationalist. 




"ILAN M. ROGERS, agent of the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford 
L^ V _, Railroad Company, stationed at 
Torrington, Conn., was born in Michigan, 
January lo, 1838, son of Orlando and Thirza 
CFuller) Rogers. His grandfather, Joel 
Rogers, who was born February 16, 1769, 
was a resident of North East, Dutchess 
County, N.Y., from h-is fifth year, and was 
there engaged in general farming up to the 
time of his death, August 30, 1855. 

Orlando Rogers was a native of Dutchess 
County, New York, and on his father's farm 
learned the art of successful farming. He set 
about reclaiming some wild land in Michigan; 
but, his health failing, he returned to New 
York State, and two years before his death he 
removed to Bridgeport, Conn, where he died 
in 1871, at the age of sixty-one. He married 
Thirza Fuller, a townswoman of his own, who 
lived to be sixty-one, dying at the home of 
her son, the subject of this sketch. They 
were the parents of eight children, five of 
whom are now living, namely: Hilan M., 
whose name heads this article; Henry; 
Ellen, widow of the late N. W. Lewis; Sarah 
J., wife of E. W. Webster; and Mary, widow 
of the late Walter Gilbert. 

Hilan M. Rogers received a common-school 
education. He enlisted for the Civil War as 
a private in Company B, Twentieth Connect- 



icut Volunteer Infantry, and before his term 
of service ended was promoted to the rank of 
Corporal. He served three years, and was a 
participant in all the prominent battles of the 
Twelfth Army Corps, including the bloody 
fields of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. 
Later he was transferred to the Army of the 
Tennessee, and was under Sherman's command 
during his march from Atlanta to Richmond. 
In the engagement at Bentonville, N.C., he 
was wounded by a minie ball, but not seri- 
ously, and was for a time in the Knight Gen- 
eral Hospital in New Haven, Conn., where he 
received his discharge from the service. Re- 
turning home he went to work November i, 
1865, on the Naugatuck Railroad, now the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. 
He was first employed as clerk in the office 
for two years, and then as an extra hand, act- 
ing for one year in a clerical capacity. On 
November i, 1868, he was appointed agent at 
Seymour, remaining till May 16, 1870, when 
he was transferred to his present position, the 
station then being called Wolcottville. He 
had at that time but one assistant, but the 
business of the road has so increased that now 
he has ten men under his charge. He has 
general supervision of an enormous freight 
traffic, and also attends to a large general 
ticket business. He has been connected with 
the road some thirty years, and has proved a 
most efficient and capable business man, ful- 
filling with steadiness, coolness, and ability 
the arduous duties of his post. 

In January, 1870, Mr. Rogers was united in 
marriage with Josephine, daughter of George 
Hoyt, a book-keeper of Ansonia, Conn. Mrs. 
Rogers died in 1888, at the age of forty-two, 
leaving one son, William H., who is a clerk 
in the station office with his father. He 
married Louise Geiger, of Torrington, and has 
one child, Hilan M., Jr. In politics Mr. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



79 



Rogers is a Democrat. Though living in a 
Republican town, he has been nominated for 
several offices of trust; but he had no desire 
for political honors, and declined to serve. 
He was, however, Probate Judge for a year, 
and has been on the School Committee at 
different times. In Masonic circles he oc- 
cupies a prominent position, belonging to 
Seneca Lodge and Cyrus Chapter of Torring- 
ton, Buel Council of Litchfield, Clark Com- 
mandery of Waterbury, Pyramid Temple, 
Mystic Shrine, of Bridgeport, and Lafayette 
Consistory, Scottish Rite. He is also a 
Tnember of Unity Lodge, No. 3054, of the 
Knights of Honor, Torrington, and has been 
Treasurer of Cyrus Chapter, No. 45, Royal 
Arch Masons, since its organization. As a 
comrade of L. W. Steele Post, Grand Army 
of the Republic, he keeps fresh the associa- 
tions of army days. Mr. Rogers is a member 
of the Episcopal church, of which his wife 
was also a communicant, and has taught in 
the Sunday-school and has been a Vestryman 
for years. He is a valued citizen of Torring- 
ton, and as agent at one of the most important 
stations on the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad has a wide circle of ac- 
quaintances, who regard him with esteem. 




iRS. CHARLES W. HINSDALE,, 
of Litchfield, was born in Bethle- 

hem, Conn., daughter of Dr. Al- 
gernon S. and Cornelia (Bennett) Lewis. 
Mrs. Hinsdale's great-grandfather, Gersham 
Lewis, was an early settler in Litchfield, 
where he resided for many years. Her grand- 
father, Ozias Lewis, was engaged in agricult- 
ure, and passed his whole life in Litchfield. 
He was a prominent man of his day, and 
served as High Sheriff of Litchfield County 
for nine years. He died at the age of eighty 



years. He married Mary Jones, of Guilford, 
Conn., who by him became the mother of four- 
teen children, and died in Litchfield at an 
advanced age. 

Algernon S. Lewis, father of Mrs. Hins- 
dale, was reared to an agricultural life. He 
studied medicine with Dr. Abbey, and after 
taking his degree at Castleton commenced the 
practice of his profession in Bethlehem, where 
he resided for a few years. He then moved to 
Milton, and a short time later located in 
Litchfield, where he conducted a lucrative 
practice for many years. He was a skilful 
and highly esteemed physician, a prominent 
citizen, and an earnest Christian. He was 
closely identified with public affairs, was 
Town Collector, and was actively interested 
in church work. Five years previous to his 
death he was compelled by failing health to 
retire from practice; and he died in 1870, 
aged sixty-one years. His wife was born in 
Litchfield, daughter of Charles G. Bennett, 
who was a native of Sharon, Conn. Her 
grandfather, Edward Bennett, who was born 
in Columbia, Conn., settled in Sharon, where 
he followed the trade of a blacksmith in con- 
nection with farming, and died there at a good 
old age. Charles G. Bennett, Mrs. Hins- 
dale's maternal grandfather, acquired his 
father's trade, and after following that occu- 
pation in Litchfield for a time as a journey- 
,man established himself in the blacksmith's 
business on his own account. In 18 14 he 
erected the house in which Mrs. Hinsdale 
now resides, and died in 1841, aged fifty-eight 
years. He married Polly McNeil, daughter 
of Samuel McNeil, a tailor of Litchfield; and 
she became the mother of four children, of 
whom Cornelia, Mrs. Hinsdale's mother, was 
the eldest. Dr. and Mrs. Lewis were the 
parents of four children, three of whom are 
living, namely: Cornelia, the subject of this 



8o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



sketch; George Sidney, who resides in Hart- 
ford; and Albert Parmelee, who is auditor 
in a railroad office in Indianapolis. The mother 
died at the age of eighty-one years. 

Cornelia (Lewis) Hinsdale has been a life- 
long resident of Litchfield, and received her 
education in that town. On March 6, 1866, 
she was united in marriage to Charles W. 
Hinsdale. Mr. Hinsdale was born in Har- 
winton, Conn., son of Wolcott and Hannah 
(Jones) Hinsdale. Mr. Hinsdale's grand- 
father was a native of Harwinton, where he 
followed agriculture throughout his life. He 
was a prominent citizen, and a street in his 
native town still bears his name. He died 
at an advanced age. Wolcott Hinsdale, Mr. 
Hinsdale's father, followed the sea in his 
early manhood, and was master of a merchant 
vessel, engaged in the West India trade. He 
later became a prosperous farmer in Harwin- 
ton, where he passed the remainder of his 
life. He was a veteran of the War of 18 12. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Hannah 
Jones, was a native of Harwinton. Her 
grandfather, Julius Jones, was accidentally 
killed in Hartford, while preparing cartridges 
for the army. Her father, who was born in 
Hartford, was a soldier of the Revolutionary 
War, and participated in the campaign which 
resulted in the surrender of General Burgoyne 
at Saratoga, N.Y. After the war he settled 
in Harwinton, where he engaged in farming, 
and died at the age of eighty-four years. 
Mrs. Wolcott Hinsdale was the mother of two 
children; namely, Sarah and Charles W. 
She died at a good old age in the home of her 
daughter in Litchfield. 

Charles W. Hinsdale, though reared to agri- 
culture at an early age, engaged in mercantile 
pursuits. He entered a store in Harwinton 
as a clerk, and after remaining there for a 
time came to Litchfield. Here he enlisted as 



a private in Company A, Nineteenth Connect- 
icut Volunteers. He was subsequently pro- 
moted to the rank of Quartermaster, and 
served until the close of the Civil War. 
After he was discharged he returned to Litch- 
field, and became a clerk in the store of F. D. 
McNeil. He later secured an interest in the 
business, and in 1893 purchased his partner's 
interest, since which time he has successfully 
conducted the store alone. He has the oldest 
established trade in Litchfield, and holds a 
steady and profitable patronage. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hinsdale are members of St. Michael's 
Church, of which Mrs. Hinsdale's great- 
grandfather was formerly sexton. She is 
an active member of the Ladies' Guild. Mr. 
Hinsdale has been librarian for many years. 



T^HARLES J. YORK, superintendent 
I j[ of the New England Pin Company and 

V»*_^ a prominent man in Winsted, was 
born in Torrington, Conn., May 2, 1841, son 
of Jesse and Mary (Hurlbut) York, the former 
a native of North Stonington, Conn. His 
father, William York, father of Jesse and 
also a native of Stonington, died in 1820, 
when in middle life His wife, whose maiden 
name was Naomi Ray, survived him many 
years, passing away in 1867 at Voluntown, 
Conn., where she is buried. They reared a 
family of two sons and four daughters, only 
one of whom, a son, survives. He was for 
many years a guard of the prison at Sing Sing, 
N.Y., and is now an octogenarian. 

Jesse York was born in 1809, and passed 
his life in farming. He was an upright and 
conscientious man and a member of the Meth- 
odist church up to the time of his death, which 
occurred when he was sixty-seven years old. 
His wife was the daughter of Robert and 
Mary Hurlbut. She was married to Mr. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



York in Winsted in 1835 by the Rev. Daniel 
Coe, of the Methodist church, of which relig- 
ious body she is a consistent member. Mrs. 
York is still living, hale in mind and body. 
She had three children, as follows: Charles 
J., the subject of this sketch; David, who 
died in Winsted, August 31, 1894, at the age 
of fifty, leaving a wife and two sons, Fred- 
erick and Charles, living respectively in Win- 
sted and Waterbury; and Wilbur F., an un- 
dertaker in Waterbury. 

Charles J. York received a fair education 
in the district schools, which he attended 
until fifteen years of age. On May 4, 1857, 
shortly after his sixteenth birthday, he en- 
tered the employ of' the New England Pin 
Company, and made such good use of his time 
and opportunities that seven years ago he be- 
came superintendent of the concern. This 
company was established in 1854, so that prac- 
tically Mr. York's life has been identified 
with that of the company, it being but three 
years old when he entered the works. The 
business has yearly increased, and is now in 
a thriving condition, furnishing employment 
to from eighty to ninety hands and occupying 
two large buildings. 

On November 18, 1862, Mr. York was mar- 
ried to Mary E., daughter of John F. and 
Deborah (Wing) Bartlett, both natives of 
Maine. Her father is still living in Win- 
sted, but her mother died in 1854. Mrs. 
York received a good education, graduating 
from a normal school and teaching for some 
years before her marriage. One daughter has 
blessed this union, F. Idella, now the wife of 
Charles B. Moore in Winsted and the mother 
of one son, Russell York Moore. 

Mr. York is active in politics. He has 
served three terms in the State legislature, 
has been a member of the School Board, and 
has filled other offices. He is a Royal Arch 



Mason, having served as High Priest of the 
local Chapter three terms. In the Methodist 
church, to which he and his wife belong, he 
has been Trustee and Steward; and for 
twenty -five years he has been regularly elected 
superintendent of the Sunday-school. He is 
also a member of the William L. Gilbert 
Board of Trustees. The family resides at 
72 Elm Street, in the handsome house which 
he built in 1872. 



tUGUSTUS A. LORD, who is living 
retired from the active pursuits of 
»^^__^ business at his pleasant home on 
North Street, Litchfield, is the worthy rep- 
resentative of one of the oldest and most 
honored families of this section of the county. 
His great-grandfather, Lynde Lord, Sr., a 
native of Lyme, Conn., came to this county 
when a young man in 1753, and purchased in 
Litchfield town a large tract of timbered land, 
which he cleared and cultivated. He became 
one of the largest landholders in this part of 
the State and a very prominent citizen. He 
was elected Sheriff of Litchfield County, a 
position which he filled most creditably for 
twenty-nine years, his son being his Deputy 
for a portion of the time. He was employed 
in the public service the larger part of his 
time, and lived to be sixty-eight years of age. 
His son, Lynde Lord, Jr., grandfather of 
Augustus A. Lord, graduated from Yale Col- 
lege, and spent his life on the paternal home- 
stead in the village of Litchfield, nearly 
opposite the present home of his grandson. 
He married Mary Lyman, and they reared a 
large family of children. Of these, Erastus 
A., who was brought up to farming, found 
rural occupations uncongenial to his tastes, 
and went when a youth to Massachusetts, 
where he learned the trade of a bookbinder. 



82 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



This he followed as an occupation for several 
years in Boston, whither he moved during the 
War of 1812. He subsequently spent a few 
years in Baltimore, Md., but in 1822 came 
to Litchfield and lived until 1844. He then 
returned to Boston, where he had charge of 
Dr. Abbey's sanatorium for a while. He sub- 
sequently returned to the home of his birth, 
where his death occurred in the sixty-ninth 
year of his age. To him and his good wife, 
formerly Charlotte Dorman, six children were 
born, of whom three are living; namely, Au- 
gustus A., Frances M., and George. The 
last-named is a resident of Hartford. The 
mother outlived her husband, dying at the 
home of her son Augustus, at the age of 
eighty-eight years. She was a woman of 
steadfast Christian principles, and she was a 
strict and devout member of the Episcopal 
church. 

Augustus A. Lord is a Bostonian by birth 
and breeding, born November 5, 181 5, in 
Hancock Street, within the shadow of Massa- 
chusetts's historic capitol. He passed a few 
of his earlier years in Baltimore; but his 
memories of the place are very indistinct, he 
having been but seven years of age when his 
parents returned to Litchfield. After leaving 
the district schools he attended for a while a 
school in Watertown, one of Boston's subur- 
ban towns. He was engaged in the book and 
stationery business for a time, but agricultural 
pursuits occupied the larger portion of his 
life. He devoted himself to the care of his 
parents during their declining years. He had 
charge of the homestead property, which he 
conducted with undoubted success until his 
retirement from the activities of life. In 
politics Mr. Lord votes with the Republican 
party, being a stanch advocate of its princi- 
ples. He has never sought official honors, 
although he served most satisfactorily for 



one term as Burgess of the borough. For 
many years he was connected with the Lone 
Star Lodge. He is broad in his religious 
opinions, and was formerly a regular attendant 
of the Episcopal church, contributing gener- 
ously toward its support. Though well ad- 
vanced in years, Mr. Lord is a bright and 
active man, thoroughly familiar with the 
leading questions of the day and full of many 
interesting reminiscences of early times. 



fRANCIS BROWN, whose brief memoir 
given below is supplemented by an ex- 
cellent portrait on the opposite page, 
was for many years an esteemed resident of 
Winsted, Conn. He died on June x, 1894, 
being then nearly seventy-nine years of age. 
His widow, Mrs. Maria M. Hewitt Brown, 
still makes her home in this pleasant village. 

Francis Brown was born in 181 5, in the city 
of Hartford, Conn. His father, James Brown, 
died some six years later, leaving a widow 
with nine children, all of whom grew to 
mature life. 

When eleven years of age Francis was de- 
prived by death of a mother's guidance and 
wise counsels, and he and a younger sister 
were taken to the home of a married sister. 
A year later the lad, who was of a rather deli- 
cate constitution, went to the home of a 
brother-in-law at Pine Plains, where he was 
put to work in James Dewell's scythe factory, 
a hard position for one so young and unused 
to toil. His school advantages were limited; 
but he developed a love for reading, and, 
selecting books useful for improvement, he 
acquired a good education through his own 
efforts, and subsequently represented Winsted 
in the legislature. He made his first appear- 
ance here in 1833, a youth of eighteen years, 
with but eight cents in his pocket, having 




(1^1^ 7206^ 



I2:'zc^'7i- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



8S 



started on foot for Hartford, but had been fort- 
unate to secure an occasional ride with some 
traveller. Hunting up Mr. Hinsdale, he ap- 
plied for work in the scythe factory, and hav- 
ing been promised a situation he visited his 
sister until the place was open for him, when 
he began work as a finisher of scythes. From 
this humble position he was gradually ad- 
vanced, and in 1838 was made general superin- 
tendent of the works. The first two years of 
his employment Mr. Brown worked by the 
piece, toiling early and late; but even then he 
made but a dollar and a half per day. With 
the perspicacity and good judgment that mark 
the able financier Mr. Brown invested his sur- 
plus earnings, acquiring a property that en- 
abled him to spend his last years in the enjoy- 
ment of leisure. 

On August 15, 1837, Mr. Brown was united 
in marriage with Maria M. Hewitt, who was 
born in Winsted in 181 2. Her parents, 
Joshua and Polly (Williams) Hewitt, were 
both of Connecticut birth, Mr. Hewitt's native 
place being New London, and his wife's the 
town of Plymouth. The only child born of 
the union of Mr. and Mrs. Brown was a daugh- 
ter, Susan M., now the wife of Charles G. 
Perry, of Stratford, Conn., and the mother of 
three children. Through the marriage of a 
grand.-daughter Mrs. Brown has one great- 
grandchild, Georgia S. Beach. For eighteen 
years Mr. and Mrs. Brown had a very attrac- 
tive home on Meadow Street, where they re- 
sided until 1872. Deciding to spend that 
year in California they broke up house-keeping 
and afterward travelled every year, visiting 
in these pleasure trips nearly every State in 
the Union. 

Neither Mr. nor Mrs. Brown ever united 
with any church, but for many years both were 
liberal supporters of the Congregational soci- 
ety. Mr. Brown was always interested in the 



cause of temperance, sparing neither time nor 
money to advance the movement. Mrs. 
Brown, a woman of much intelligence and 
force of character, generous and public-spir- 
ited, is using the wealth at her command not 
for herself alone, but in various ways to pro- 
mote the highest interests of the community. 
In more recent years she has occupied rooms at 
the Beardslee House, one of the best and most 
homelike hotels in the State. 

From this house can be seen, on the summit 
of the hill, the beautiful monument erected by 
the village of Winsted in memory of her sons 
who fell in the Civil War, a memorial of 
which the people may well be proud, and for 
which Mrs. Brown deserves much credit, she 
having contributed from the estate left her by 
her husband over sixteen thousand dollars 
toward its erection. This tall marble shaft 
has an inside measurement of twelve feet in 
length and breadth, and is lined from base to 
apex with polished marble panels, whereon are 
inscribed the records of the three hundred and 
more brave men from this place that willingly 
sacrificed their lives for their beloved country. 



■UDGE GEORGE C. HARRISON, who, 
with the exception of two terms, has 
served as Probate Judge since 1876, is 
also a leading agriculturist of Cornwall, where 
he was born on May 19, 1840, son of John R. 
and Eleanor (Bradford) Harrison. Noah Har- 
rison, great-grandfather of George C, was the 
first representative of this branch of the family 
in Cornwall. His son, Edmund Harrison, was 
born in that town in 1768. Edmund Harrison 
nearly all his lifetime lived in Cornwall Hol- 
low, where he followed the occupation of a 
farmer, and died at the very advanced age of 
ninety-eight years and eight months. He 
married Miss Ruth Hopkins, of Warren, 



86 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Conn., who made him the father of eight chil- 
dren, as follows: Riifus, Noah, Myron, Chand- 
ler, Lucretia, John R., Hannah, and William 
H. The mother lived to be eighty-five years 
old. 

John R. Harrison, who was born in Corn- 
wall, received his education in the common 
schools of that town. For a number of years 
he engaged in teaching, after which he was 
in mercantile business at Cornwall Centre. 
He subsequently settled on the old homestead 
and devoted his attention to agriculture with 
satisfactory results. In his political views he 
was a Democrat, and he took a leading part in 
public affairs. For seventeen years he served 
his town as Selectman. He was a Judge of 
the Probate Court for six years, and a Repre- 
sentative to the State legislature during three 
sessions. He died in Cornwall Centre at sev- 
enty-three years of age. His wife, Eleanor 
(Bradford) Harrison, was a daughter of James 
F. Bradford, of Cornwall, and was of the sixth 
generation in direct line from Governor Brad- 
ford. She lived to be eighty-two years old. 
Their four children were: George C. ; Cath- 
erine, wife of William H. H. Hewitt, who 
has a son and daughter, Mary C. and William 
H. ; Wilbur F. , who married Miss Harriet E. 
Miner, a daughter of Luther Miner; and John 
B., who married Miss Florence Porter, and 
has three children — Florence E., Wilbur T., 
and Katie. 

George C. Harrison was educated in the 
common and select schools of Cornwall. At 
an early age he turned his attention to farm- 
ing. Later he bought a farm of his father 
near Cornwall Centre, where he has since 
lived. It contains three hundred acres of 
land, on which he is prosperously engaged in 
mixed farming and dairying. 

In 1862 he was united in marriage with Re- 
becca Todd, a daughter of Carrington Todd, of 



Cornwall. They have nine children, of whom 
Cynthia R. married F. H. Monroe, and has 
one son, George H. ; Eleanor H. is the wife 
of Mark Halliday; George E. married Miss 
Flora Moore, and has two daughters, Betsey 
and Rebecca; Katie J. is the wife of Henry 
D. Whitney, and has one son, Burke Emerson. 
The rest are: Charlotte A., Gertrude C. , 
Anna S., Mabel T. , and John R. 

Judge Harrison is a stanch Democrat. In 
1870 he served as a Representative in the 
State legislature ; and for eleven years he has 
filled the ofifice of Town Clerk and Treasurer 
very acceptably. At the present time he holds 
the office of Judge of the Probate Court, hav- 
ing since his first election in 1876 served in 
that position about seventeen years. He and 
his family are attendants of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church of Cornwall. 



1:^; 



M H. GRISWOLD, an enter- 
ng and successful boot and shoe 
dealer of Thomaston, was born in 
Goshen, Conn., November 18, 1859, son of 
Homer W. and Mary (Butler) Griswold. Mr. 
Griswold's grandfather, Julius Griswold, who 
was of English ancestry, was a native of Litch- 
field, Conn., where his father was an early set- 
tler. Julius Griswold followed the occupation 
of a millwright and contractor, and resided in 
Litchfield until his death, which occurred at 
the age of eighty-seven years. 

Homer W. Griswold, Mr. Griswold's father, 
was born in Milton, Litchfield County. He 
learned the trade of a machinist and tool- 
maker in Terryville. In early manhood he 
went West, where he followed his trade and 
also engaged in farming for a time. He 
returned later to his native State, and while 
residing in Goshen enlisted as a private in the 
Nineteenth Regiment Connecticut Volunteer 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



87 



Infantry. He served three years in the Civil 
War, during which time he was advanced to 
the rank of First Lieutenant in recognition of 
his capacity for the military service. He sub- 
sequently drew the notice of the War Depart- 
ment, and at the close of the war he was 
offered a captain's commission in the regular 
army, which he respectfully declined. After 
leaving the service he returned to Goshen, and 
later went to Waterbury, where he remained 
for a time. He finally settled in Terryville, 
of this county, and since has had charge of the 
shipping department of the Eagle Lock Com- 
pany. He is still active at the age of sixty- 
six. His wife is a daughter of the late Lewis 
L. Butler, who was formerly a prosperous 
farmer of Harwinton, Conn. , and a representa- 
tive of an old and reputable family of that 
town. Mr. and Mrs. Griswold have had four 
children, three of whom are living, namely: 
William H., the subject of this sketch; and 
Louise and Lotta, who are teachers in Cam- 
bridge, Mass. Louise Griswold is a specialist 
in geography, and took a prize at the World's 
Fair for an unusually fine display of maps. 
She is an expert teacher, an interesting and 
instructive writer. Both parents are members 
of the Congregational church, of which the 
father is a Deacon. 

William H. Griswold commenced his educa- 
tion in the common schools and completed it 
at the State Normal School in New Britain. 
After teaching for four seasons in Terryville 
he entered the employ of the Eagle Lock Com- 
pany as shipping clerk, in which capacity he 
continued for six years. For the succeeding 
three years he acted as travelling salesman 
through the New England and the Southern 
States, and then resigned his position to be- 
come superintendent of the case department of 
the Seth Thomas Clock Company in Thomas- 
ton. At the expiration of five years he retired 



from that concern and engaged in the dry- 
goods business in Manchester, Hartford 
County, where he remained for a short time. 
In 1 89 1 he returned to Thomaston, and, pur- 
chasing the established boot and shoe business 
of J. J. McNamara, has since conducted it 
with the most gratifying results. He carries 
a large and varied stock of fine footwear of 
every description, and displays an energy and 
business ability certain to insure continued 
success. In politics he is a Republican, and 
is connected with the fraternity of A. F. & 
A. M. and that of the Red Men. On June 3, 
1887, Mr. Griswold was married to Minnie 
Thomas, daughter of Aaron Thomas, of 
Thomaston. They have three children: 
Grace, Gladys, and Agnes. Mr. and Mrs. 
Griswold are members of the Congregational 
church and Sabbath-school. 

Aaron Thomas, Mrs. Griswold' s father, was 
born in Plymouth Hollow, now called Thomas- 
ton, March 13, 1830, and is the third son of 
Seth and Laura Thomas. He was educated in 
the public schools and was engaged in team- 
ing. He was also interested in the manufact- 
ure of clocks, and in January, 1859, he was 
chosen President of the Seth Thomas Clock 
Company, a position which he ably filled for 
more than thirty years. In October, 1865, a 
new company was organized under the name of 
the Seth Thomas's Sons Company. Aaron 
Thomas was also President of that enterprise 
until 1879, when the two companies were con- 
solidated. He presided over the affairs of this 
well-known concern until 1892, when feeble 
health caused him to resign; and he is now 
living in retirement. He is a Republican in 
politics, and was elected a Representative to 
the legislature from Thomaston in 188 1. On 
October 4-, 1848, he married Phebe A. Hine, 
and has two children living; namely, Edson 
and Minnie. Aaron, Jr., the third child, is 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



deceased. Mr. Thomas is a member of the 

Congregational church. He has been first 

Selectman of Thomaston for a number of 
years. 



WILLIAM L. 
ing in his 



RANSOM, who is liv- 
is pleasant home at Litch- 
field, retired from the active pursuits 
of life, is an attorney by profession, and for 
twenty-eight years served most ably and satis- 
factorily as Clerk of the Court of Litchfield 
County. He is a native of Massachusetts, 
born in Granville, Hampden County, March 
28, 1822, son of Elisha and Kate (Coe) Ran- 
som. Elisha Ransom spent the early part of 
his life in this State, working on a farm in 
Hartland, and there also learning the shoe- 
maker's trade, which he followed for some 
years. When enfeebled by age he settled at 
Barkhamsted, in this county, making that his 
permanent abiding-place until called to join 
the silent majority at the venerable age of 
ninety-one years. The maiden name of his 
wife was Kate Coe, a native of Hartland ; and, 
of the family of six children born to them, 
four are living, and are as follows : Cyrus, a 
retired business man, residing at Winsted, 
Conn. ; William L. , the subject of this 
sketch; Timothy C, a lawyer, formerly of 
Grafton, N. Dak. ; and Sarah C, widow of 
Jason H. Huyler. The mother's death pre- 
ceded that of her husband, occurring in Bark- 
hamsted when she was seventy-five years of 
age. She was a faithful Christian woman, 
and, with her life companion, was a sincere 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

William L. Ransom when- a boy of five 
years accompanied his parents from their Mas- 
sachusetts home to this county, and received 
his elementary education in the public schools 
of Barkhamsted. At the age of nineteen 
years he began working for himself, first as a 



tiller of the soil and afterward in a factory. 
In' 1852, being desirous of entering upon a 
professional career, Mr. Ransom began reading 
law with Hiram Goodwin, an attorney of that 
town, and continued to do so until his admis- 
sion to the bar in October, 1854. After prac- 
tising for a brief time in Barkhamsted he 
opened an ofifice in Ansonia, New Haven 
County. Before long he returned to his early 
home, and engaged in his profession until 
1857, when he located in Litchfield. Here he 
formed a partnership with the Hon. John H. 
Hubbard; and the firm carried on a good busi- 
ness for six years, during which it came to be 
counted among the leading law firms of the 
county. In i860 Mr. Ransom was honored by 
receiving the appointment of Clerk of the 
Superior and Supreme Court of Errors, an ofifice 
which he at once accepted. While filling this 
position he continued his relations with Mr. 
Hubbard for three years longer, when the part- 
nership was dissolved. From the time of his 
acceptance of it until 1888 Mr. Ransom was a 
faithful incumbent of his ofifice, and won the 
respect and good will of every one with whom 
he was brought in contact. A man of great 
patience, kind and courteous to all, he was 
well-deserving of the high regard in which he 
was held by his associates. 

On October 18, 1853, Mr. Ransom was mar- 
ried to Mary H. Hayward, a daughter of 
Amasa Hayward, of Conway, Mass. Her 
father was a tiller of the soil in Western Mas- 
sachusetts, but spent his declining years at the 
home of a son in Canaan, Conn. His family 
consisted of two sons and three daughters; and, 
of these, two daughters are yet living. Mrs. 
Ransom died when seventy-five years old, leav- 
ing behind her a worthy record of a busy and 
usefully spent life. Both Mr. and Mrs. Ran- 
som were ever held in high estimation by their 
friends and neighbors, and she was a faithful 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



89 



member of the Congregational church. Politi- 
cally, Mr. Ransom was formerly a Whig, but 
has affiliated with the Republican party since 
its formation. He is an active worker in his 
party's ranks, and for two years served his 
constituents as Warden of the borough. He is 
a man of strong convictions, well-informed on 
the current topics, and broad and liberal in 
all of his views. 




IRAM ALPHA SMITH, a well-known 
agriculturist of the town of Cole- 
L!:^ V^ ^ brook and one of the brave de- 
fenders of the Union in the Civil War, was 
born in that town, May 3, 1836. He comes 
from honorable English ancestry, and is a 
descendant of a pioneer settler of Litchfield 
County. His grandfather, Joseph Smith, who 
was born in Simsbury, when twelve years old 
went with his parents from that place to Nor- 
folk. He was there reared to maturity, and 
made his first purchase of land in that town. 
He subsequently bought a tract of wild land in 
the western part of Colebrook and made it his 
permanent abiding-place. He was one of 
those who acted a patriot's part in the Revolu- 
tionary War, and preserved a lively recollec- 
tion of many of its more memorable scenes up 
to the time of his death, which occurred No- 
vember 8, 1846, at the remarkable age of 
ninety-five years. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Sibyl Wardell, a native of Branford, 
New Haven County, died at the comparatively 
early age of fifty-six years. She bore him 
seven- children; namely, Humphrey, Josephus, 
Lois, Betsey, Laura, Evaline, and Hiram G. 

Hiram Guy Smith, father of the subject of 
this sketch, was born in Norfolk, July 15, 
1797. For a while after reaching manhood he 
was engaged in the clothier's trade, but finally 
turned his attention to agriculture. After 



working on the parental homestead for a num- 
ber of years he succeeded to its ownership, 
and managed it successfully until his decease 
at the venerable age of fourscore and two 
years. For a life companion he wooed and 
won the affections of Clementina Barber, who 
was born and bred in Canton, Hartford County, 
the date of her birth being May 29, 1804. 
Her father, Michael Barber, Jr., was the son 
of Michael Barber and Azubah Brown. Azu- 
bah Brown was the daughter of John Brown, 
third, and Hannah Owen. John Brown, third, 
was the son of John Brown, second, and Mary 
Eggleston. John Brown, second, was the son 
of John Brown, first, and Elizabeth Loomis. 
John Brown, first, was the son of Peter Brown, 
second, and Mary Gillett. Peter Brown, sec- 
ond, was the son of Peter Brown, the Pilgrim 
who came over in the "Mayflower," December 
22, 1620. Mr. Barber and his wife, Anna 
(Taylor) Barber, lived in Canton several years 
after their marriage; but in 1809 they fol- 
lowed the tide of emigration westward, settling 
in the present populous State of Ohio. They 
started for their new home in the fall, making 
the overland journey with teams, and being six 
weeks on the way. Mr. Barber bought a tract 
of timber land in the town of Marlboro, and in 
the midst of the dense wilderness erected a 
log cabin for himself and family, and began a 
clearing for a farm. He had not, however, 
made much progress when he was taken sick, 
and, dying soon after, his remains were placed 
in a log hollowed out for the purpose. His 
widow, with three little girls, returned to 
Canton, her native town, where she remained 
until her deceas'e. Her daughter, Clementina, 
came to Colebrook when a maiden of ten years, 
and made her home with Luman Barber until 
her marriage. She died September 22, 1890, 
in the eighty-seventh year of her age, having 
lived to see seven generations, as she distinctly 



90 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



remembered Hannah Owen, wife of John 
Brown, third, who was her great-grandmother. 
Hiram Alpha Smith was an early attendant 
at the district school, and afterward completed 
his studies at the Norfolk Seminary. At the 
age of twenty-one he began teaching, a profes- 
sion which he followed during the winter 
season for a number of years, devoting the 
remainder of each year to agricultural employ- 
ments. In 1876 Mr. Smith began his career 
as a travelling salesman, representing the 
Empire Knife Company and the Beardsley 
Scythe Company for several seasons, afterward 
being employed in the same capacity by the 
Thayer Scythe Company. He now represents 
the Winsted Manufacturing Company, in 
whose employment he has been since 1887. 
The territory over which he travels embraces a 
portion of Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania, 
and New Jersey. During the entire time 
he has been so engaged Mr. Smith's home has 
been in Colebrook, In 1858 he took up his 
residence on the beautiful farm where he now 
lives. He enlisted August 28, 1862, in Com- 
pany F, Twenty-eighth Connecticut Volunteer 
Infantry, for a term of nine months' service in 
the Civil War, joining the regiment at Camp 
Terry. In the fall he was sent South to the 
Gulf, to join Banks's department of the Nine- 
teenth Army Corps, wintering at Pensacola, 
whence he proceeded to Port Hudson. He 
participated in the siege and capture of that 
place. He remained with his regiment until 
its arrival in Memphis, Tenn., where, on ac- 
count of sickness, he was left in the hospital, 
August 8, 1863. He remained here until the 
19th, when he started for New Haven. At 
New Haven he -(vas honorably discharged Au- 
gust 28, and returned then to his native town 
quite enfeebled in health. 

On the 9th of September, 1858, Mr. Smith 
was united in marriage with Harriet North, a 



native of Colebrook, born January 12, 1830. 
Her father, Joel North, was born June 10, 
1795, in the same town, son of Rufus North, 
a native of Torrington, and grandson of Mar- 
tin North, also born in Torrington. Ebenezer 
North, father of Martin North and great-great- 
grandfather of Mrs. Smith, removed from 
Farmington to Torrington when a young man, 
being one of the very early settlers of that 
town, as his son Martin was of Colebrook in 
after years. Martin was a chair-maker by 
trade, and also manufactured spinning-wheels, 
an important industry of his day. He married 
Abigail Eno, who, without doubt, used a spin- 
ning-wheel which he made. Rufus North, 
Mrs. Smith's grandfather, was a skilful wood 
worker, making churns, tubs, oars, and mould 
boards, and, in addition thereto, was a pros- 
perous farmer, his wife, formerly Esther Ro- 
bards, having been a faithful helpmeet. Joel 
North learned the trade of a blacksmith, and 
was also skilful in repairing clocks and 
watches. He was likewise interested in farm- 
ing. He first bought a small farm, upon 
which there was a saw-mill, which he operated 
until 1834. He then sold that property and 
bought the homestead where Mr. Smith and 
his family now reside, and here worked at his 
trade and engaged in farming until his death, 
in January, 1855, at the age of fifty-nine 
years. The maiden name of his wife was Har- 
riet Taylor, a daughter of Jesse and Polly 
(Owen) Taylor. She was born in Colebrook, 
and lived to the age of sixty-three years, rear- 
ing six children; namely, Emily and Esther 
(twins), Harriet, Lester, Joel, and Eben. 
Jesse Taylor was a soldier in the Revolution- 
ary Army, serving seven years. His wife, 
Polly, was a daughter of Amos and Mercy 
(Brown) Owen, who, being the great-grand- 
mother of Mrs. Smith, was also a lineal de- 
scendant of Peter Brown, who came over in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



91 



"Mayflower"; while the North family, her 
paternal ancestors, came over on a later voy- 
age. Five children have been born of the 
union of Mr. and Mrs. Smith ; namely, How- 
ard, Gertrude C. , Lester N. , Julian H., and 
Josephine H. Mr. Smith is a man of un- 
doubted integrity, well known throughout the 
community, and is a valued member of Cole- 
brook society. 



KRANK M. WHEELER, of Torrington, 
shipping clerk for the Turner & Sey- 
mour Manufacturing Company, was 
born in Avon, Conn., May 27, 1847, son of 
Amos and Martha (Chidsey) Wheeler. Mr. 
Wheeler's grandfather, Amos Wheeler, resided 
in Avon the greater part of his life, where he 
followed the occupation of a miller in connec- 
tion with farming. He was prosperous in his 
business affairs, owned considerable real es- 
tate, and was a prominent man in the town. 
He contributed the land for a church and semi- 
nary in Avon. His generous nature and the 
deep interest he took in the general welfare of 
the town were among the most notable traits 
in his character. He died at the age of forty- 
five years. 

Amos Wheeler, Jr., Mr. Wheeler's father, 
was born in Avon. He was first employed in 
driving a team between Avon and Collinsville, 
carrying produce and merchandise; but later 
he entered mercantile business as a clerk. He 
afterward conducted a large general store upon 
his own account, and for some years was a 
prominent merchant in Avon. He relin- 
quished store-keeping, and, after selling Yan- 
kee notions upon the road for a time, became 
a travelling salesman for a wholesale house in 
Hartford. In 1869 he took up his residence 
in Torrington, and later resigned his position 
with the Hartford concern for the purpose of 



entering the employ of the Coe Brothers in 
Torrington. Amos Wheeler, Jr., died in 
1883, aged sixty-two years. His wife, Martha 
Chidsey before marriage, was a daughter of 
Jacob Chidsey, of Avon. Her father, who 
was a prosperous farmer and a representative 
of an old and highly reputable family, raised 
a family of six children, of whom but two are 
now living. They are : Martha, who became 
Mrs. Amos Wheeler; and her twin sister, 
Mary, who is now Mrs. Smith, of Avon. 
Mrs. Amos Wheeler became the mother of 
seven children, six of whom grew to maturity, 
and are as follows: Frank M., the subject of 
this sketch; Perlie; Nellie, wife of Edward 
H. Haley, of Torrington; Lillie, who married 
E. T. Coe, Treasurer of the Coe Brass Manu- 
facturing Company; Homer C. , who married 
Jennie A. Scoville, and is an employee at the 
Coe Brothers' manufactory; and Leonard D., 
a brass caster for the same firm. The mother 
resides in Torrington, and is a member of the 
Congregational church. 

Frank M. Wheeler passed his early boyhood 
in Avon, and was educated in the schools of 
that town. At the age of fourteen he went to 
Farmington, Conn., where he was employed in 
a drug store for two years. He then went to 
Hartford, and was engaged in the same busi- 
ness for four years. After this he was drug 
clerk in Saratoga, N. Y., for eight months, 
and in Torrington for one year. He was sub- 
sequently in the employ of the Excelsior 
Needle Company and of the Coe Brass Manu- 
facturing Company, after which, in 1876, he 
became connected with the Turner & Seymour 
Company. The business of this firm, moder- 
ate at this date, developed rapidly thereafter, 
and is at the present time one of the largest 
in the manufacture of upholstery trimmings 
and small iron castings in New England. Mr. 
Wheeler has held his present responsible posi- 



92 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tion of shipping clerk for nearly twenty years, 
and his energy and business ability are well 
appreciated by his employers. Mr. Wheeler 
is a member of the Knights of Honor, and 
holds the office of Reporter in the Lodge in 
Torrington. He is a member and Secretary of 
the New England Order of Protection in Tor- 
rington, and was formerly a member and Past 
Chancellor of the Knights of Pythias. He is 
a Republican in politics. 

Mr. Wheeler has been twice married. In 
1874 he was united to his first wife, whose 
maiden name was Helen A. Langdon. She 
was born in Hartford, daughter of John W. 
Langdon, a carriage trimmer, who moved to 
Torrington, where his daughter passed the 
greater part of her life. She died at the age 
of thirty-eight years, leaving five children, as 
follows: Edward C, who is employed in the 
office of the Register Printing Company, Tor- 
rington ; Lillian, who is a clerk in a dry-goods 
store; Phillip H. ; Clarence P. ; and Grace E. 
Mr. Wheeler wedded for his second wife Eliza 
Jones, daughter of David Jones, formerly a shoe- 
maker of Torrington. She was born in Wel- 
lington, England, and emigrated with her 
parents to the United States. They re- 
sided for a time in Torrington, and later 
moved to New York State, where her father 
is engaged in farming. Mrs. Wheeler's par- 
ents raised a family of five children, and 
two of her brothers are engaged in the shoe 
business in Torrington. 

Mr. Wheeler has been a member of the 
Third Congregational Church of Torrington 
since 1874, and has been connected with the 
Sunday-school for twenty years, during ten 
years of which he was the superintendent. 
He is at the present time a Deacon of the 
church and a Director and Treasurer of the 
Young Men's Christian Association. Mrs. 
Wheeler is also a member of the church. 



^|t7\0BERT HENDERSON, a highly in- 
\y\ telligent and capable Scotsman, whose 
-i}p v ^ ^ portrait is placed in close proxim- 
ity to the present sketch, has been employed 
for about twenty-eight years by the Plume & 
Atwood Manufacturing Company as master 
mechanic of their branch mill at Thomaston, 
Litchfield County. He was born at Loan- 
head, about six miles from Edinburgh, Scot- 
land, on the 29th of January, 1844. His 
parents were John and Elizabeth (Hunter) 
Henderson, the father being a native of Penni 
Cuick, a place nine miles distant from Edin- 
burgh. 

John Henderson's great-grandfather, Deacon 
John, of the United Presbyterian church, was 
also a native of Penni Cuick, where he followed 
the vocation of a millwright. He spent his 
whole life in that place, living to the age of 
threescore years and ten. Robert Henderson, 
the first, son of Deacon John Henderson, 
learned not only the trade followed by his 
father, but that of a machinist, or wood and 
iron worker, as well. He was engaged in 
work at or near his birthplace until toward 
the close of his life, when he came to Amer- 
ica, and settled near the town of Norwich, 
Conn. He died there at seventy-five years of 
age. 

His son John, the father of the leading sub- 
ject of this biographical notice, was reared to 
the vocation of a millwright, at which he 
worked as a journeyman in Scotland for seven- 
teen years. He then decided to try his fort- 
unes in the United States; and, arriving here 
on August I, i860, he settled in Greenville, 
Conn., near the home of his father. After 
working there for a time as a machinist, he 
removed to Waterbury, where he is still em- 
ployed in the shop of the Waterbury Brass 
Company, although he is now a man seventy- 
two years old, and has been actively engaged 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



9S 



at his vocation for nearly half a century. His 
wife, Elizabeth Hunter, daughter of Robert 
Hunter, a successful blacksmith, was born in 
Lasswade, Scotland. In that place, not far 
distant from Edinburgh, for generations her 
ancestors have engaged in the same vocation ; 
and a brother is to-day occupying the same 
stand where their great-grandfather worked at 
his forge. Mr. and Mrs. John Henderson 
reared nine children, seven sons and two 
daughters, as follows: Robert; Elizabeth, the 
widow of Samuel Geddes; John, who is the 
proprietor of a machine shop in Waterbury, 
Conn., where he is a well-known citizen, and 
for many y§ars has acted as Deacon of the 
Third Congregational Church; David, a super- 
intending machinist in the Waterbury Brass 
Company; .James (deceased); William, a 
machinist in the employ of the Waterbury 
Clock Company at Waterbury; Alexander, 
who works in the machine shop of his brother 
John; Annie, the wife of William H. Mari- 
gold, who conducts a printing-office in Bridge- 
port, Conn., of which city he has served two 
terms as Mayor, and who has also been a Sen- 
ator in the State legislature; and Thomas, a 
machinist in the employ of his brother, John 
Henderson. Robert Hunter had four sons 
and four daughters, Mrs. Henderson being the 
eldest daughter. She died in August, 1875, 
at fifty-two years of age. Both she and her 
husband were formerly members of the Presby- 
terian church of Scotland; but, after coming 
to America, she united with the Second Con- 
gregational Church of Waterbury. 

Robert Henderson acquired a good practical 
education in the common schools of his native 
land. He was sixteen years of age at the 
time he accompanied his parents to this coun- 
try, and he remained with his father in Nor- 
wich for about eighteen months. He then went 
to South Windham, Conn., where he secured a 



position in the machine shop of Smith & 
Winchester, manufacturers of paper machin- 
ery ; but six months later he went to Hartford, 
and was employed during the following year by 
Woodruff & Beach, builders of engines for 
war ships. The next year, he worked in 
Waterbury for the Farrell Foundry and Ma- 
chine Company, returning the following year 
to his old position with Woodruff & Beach. 
He was then employed for a year in Rainbow, 
Hartford County, Conn., after which he went 
to Waterbury for six months as a pattern- 
maker, thence to Holyoke, Mass., for a brief 
time; and in June, 1867, he returned to 
Waterbury, and took a position with the 
Plume & Atwood Manufacturing Company, 
by whom he is still employed at their branch 
factory in Thomaston. He is superintendent 
of general repairing at this place, looking 
after all repairs and additions, and is now 
among the oldest employees. 

In 1 865, he was united in marriage with 
Miss Margaret Crawford, who was born in 
Scotland, and is a daughter of William and 
Margaret (Glenn) Crawford. Her father 
afterward came to this country, and settled in 
Norwich, Conn., where he lived until the time 
of his death. He and his wife reared the 
following children: William Crawford; 
Agnes, who married Robert Henderson, uncle 
of our subject; John Crawford, who served in 
the Civil War, enlisting in July, 1862, in 
Company A of the Eighteenth Connecticut 
Regiment, and died July 2, 1863, at Winches- 
ter, Va. ; Margaret, now Mrs. Robert Hender- 
son; and Mary, who married Charles A. 
Hatch. The mother died in Norwich at 
sixty-six years of age. Both parents were 
connected with the Congregational church; 
and the father, who took a keen interest in 
town affairs, served as Justice of the Peace 
for several years. Mr. and Mrs. Henderson 



96 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



are the parents of eight children, seven of 
whom are still living, namely: John, a ma- 
chinist in the employ of the Farrell Foundry 
and Machine Company at Waterbury, Conn. ; 
Margaret; William; Annie, who is attending 
the Normal School at New Britain, Conn. ; 
Mary; Alfred; and Andrew. Elizabeth died 
at two years of age. 

In politics Mr. Henderson is a Democrat. 
He has served as Selectman of Thomaston for 
three terms, and as a member of the Board 
of Relief two years. He is a prominent 
Mason, being a member of Union Lodge, No. 
96, A. F. & A. M. ; Granite Chapter, No. 36, 
Royal Arch Maso.i; Clark Commandery, No. 
7, Knights Templars, of Waterbury; the Ma- 
sonic Council at Waterbury; and of the Mys- 
tic Shrine, Pyramid Temple, of Bridgeport. 
He is also a member of the Connecticut Past 
Masters Association, Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, No. 4, of Thomaston. Mr. Hen- 
derson is widely known and much respected. 
They reside on East Main Street, Plymouth 
Hill, in the pleasant home which he has 
altered and improved since he purchased the 
property. 

1 mmm t 

iDWIN R DICKINSON, a prosperous 
farmer of Litchfield, was born in that 
town, January 4, 1821, son of Amos 
and Sally (Perry) Dickinson. Mr. Dickin- 
son's grandfather, Solomon Dickinson, was 
formerly a resident of Connecticut, but passed 
his later years in New York State, where he 
died. He was twice married, and had four 
children by his first union. Amos Dickinson, 
Mr. Dickinson's father, was born in Litch- 
field, and acquired the trade of a millwright. 
He followed that occupation through life, and 
died in Litchfield, aged seventy-seven years. 
His wife, who was born in Weston, Fairfield 
County, Conn., became the mother of four 



children, of whom Edwin P., the subject of 
this sketch, is the only survivor. She died in 
Litchfield at the age of fifty-four years. Both 
parents were members of the Episcopal church. 

Edwin P. Dickinson was educated in the 
public schools. At the age of fourteen he 
began life for himself as a farm laborer, an 
occupation which he followed until he reached 
the age of seventeen, when he commenced to 
learn the trade of a carriage-maker. He 
worked at that trade for fourteen years, and 
then moved to his present farm, where he has 
since resided. His property, containing two 
hundred and fifty acres, is devoted to general 
farming, and yields him a satisfactory income. 
He is a Republican in politics, and has served 
as Grand Juror and Assessor. He is a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and was formerly a member of the Lodge in 
Litchfield. He is also connected with the 
Grange. 

On July 3, 1848, Mr. Dickinson was united 
in marriage to Emma Gilbert. She was born 
in Litchfield, daughter of Truman Gilbert, 
who was a well-to-do farmer and a representa- 
tive of an old and prominent family of the 
neighborhood. Both he and his wife are now 
dead. Mrs. Edwin P. Dickinson became the 
mother of two children, namely: Gilbert 
Amos, who died at the age of nine years; and 
Ithamer T. Mr. Dickinson's wife died in 
1876, aged forty-nine years. She was a 
member of the Episcopal church. Edwin P. 
Dickinson also attends that church, and has 
served it as Warden. 

Ithamer T. Dickinson was born upon the 
farm where he now resides, November 17, 
1854. He received his education in the pub- 
lic schools, and at an early age commenced to 
assist his father in attending to the farm 
duties. He has always remained at home, and 
now devotes his time and energies to conduct- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



97 



ing the farm, thereby relieving his father of 
all care and responsibility during his declining 
years. He married Celia Pratt, daughter of 
Edward Pratt, of Litchfield, and has two chil- 
dren; namely. Lulu E. and Edith Louise. 
Ithamer T. Dickinson is a Republican in poli- 
tics, and was a Selectman for three years. He 
is an active member of the Grange. In his 
religious views he is an Episcopalian, is secre- 
tary and treasurer of Trinity Church, and also 
a Vestryman. 



^ ■**»-» ■■ 



T^HARLES A. McNEIL, who is now 
I Sf living in retirement in Litchfield, was 

V»!l_^ born upon the farm where he now 
resides, May 3, 18 19, son of John and Polly 
(Catlin) McNeil. Mr. McNeil's great-grand- 
father, Archibald McNeil, was a native of the 
north of Ireland. He was of Scotch ancestry, 
the family having established their residence 
in Ireland during the reign of Robert Bruce. 
In company with two brothers, his father, 
mother, and an infant, he sailed for America ; 
and they were shipwrecked in the vicinity of 
Newport, wher6 his father, mother, and the 
infant were lost, as well as all he and they 
possessed. One of the brothers returned; 
while he and the other brother remained in 
America. They settled in Litchfield, where 
they bought land for the cost of survey, and 
cleared a good farm, which was located upon 
what is known as McNeil Hill. They en- 
gaged in mercantile business, and later intro- 
duced the manufacture of linen and woollen 
goods. They passed the remainder of their 
lives in Litchfield, and both died at about the 
age of seventy years. Mr. McNeil's grand- 
father, Archibald McNeil, was born in Litch- 
field, and was a lifelong resident of that town. 
He had a family of seven children, of whom 
Mr. McNeil's father was the only son. 

John McNeil was born in Litchfield and 



passed his boyhood at the homestead there. 
He was reared to farm life, and after the death 
of his father he succeeded to the ownership of 
the property. He followed agriculture suc- 
cessfully, and lived to the age of eighty-one 
years. His wife was a native of Litchfield, 
daughter of Able Catlin, who was a soldier in 
the Revolutionary War, and died in Farming- 
ton at an advanced age. His family consisted 
of three sons and four daughters. Mrs. John 
McNeil became the mother of nine children, 
of whom Charles A., the subject of this 
sketch, is the only survivor. She lived to the 
age of eighty years. Both parents were mem- 
bers of the Congregational church. 

Charles A. McNeil resided at home, assist- 
ing his father in carrying on the farm, until 
he was twenty-one years of age. He then 
purchased a small piece of property in Litch- 
field, which he cultivated for a time. Subse- 
quently he engaged in the manufacture of 
woollen goods in Goshen, but shortly after re- 
turned to agriculture, which he followed until 
1851. In this year he caught the gold fever 
and went to the diggings in California, where 
he remained for two years. Upon his return 
he engaged in mercantile pursuits in Litch- 
field until 1859, when he went back to Cali- 
fornia. In 1862 he returned again and ran a 
store in his native town for seven years, after 
which he sold out and engaged in farming with 
his brother upon the property he now occupies. 
He resided there for one year; and, after culti- 
vating his cousin's farm for five years, he en- 
gaged in trade to some extent in Torrington 
for a time, and then settled on his present 
estate, where he has since resided. The prop- 
erty, which is known as Mountain View Farm, 
consists of one hundred acres; and its eleva- 
tion makes it a desirable and healthy location 
in which to reside. Mr. McNeil is a Demo- 
crat in politics. He is a member of St. 



98 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Paul's Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Litchfield, 
and was formerly a member of the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows. 

In 1840 Mr. McNeil was married to his first 
wife, whose maiden name was Matilda 
Wheeler. She was one of the nine children 
of William Wheeler, formerly a prosperous 
farmer of Stonington, who moved to Litch- 
field, where he passed the remainder of his 
life. By this union there were three children, 
two of whom are still living; namely, Emily 
and George S. Emily married B. C. Sweet, 
a merchant of Hill's Grove, near Providence, 
R. I., and has three children, named Arthur, 
Mabel, and Harry. George S. , who is a dyer 
in Lynn, Mass., is married and has two chil- 
dren, named Charles and Archibald. Mr. Mc- 
Neil's first wife, who was a member of the 
Episcopal church, died at the age of thirty- 
nine. He wedded for his second wife Mrs. 
Seraphina (Wheeler) Warner, daughter of 
Prentice and Seraphina Wheeler, of Stoning- 
ton, the former of whom was a shoemaker by 
trade. He had settled in Litchfield with his 
father, William Wheeler, and they passed the 
remainder of their lives in that town. Sera- 
phina Wheeler, who was twice married, had five 
children by her first husband, three of whom 
are still living; namely, Mrs. McNeil, Emily, 
and Ansel. The mother still survives. Mr. 
and Mrs. McNeil have one daughter, named 
Ida B., who is now the wife of Clarence Way, 
a jeweller of Brooklyn, N. Y., and has one son, 
named Charles McNeil Way. Mr. McNeil is 
not connected with any religious denomina- 
tion, but assists liberally in supporting the 
various churches. He has lived a busy and 
industrious life. He is liberal and ho.spitable, 
an interesting conversationalist, with an intel- 
ligent conception of public matters, and is 
now enjoying a well-earned rest from the 
active labors of life. 



tfRANK A. CASE, a prosperous mer- 
p(j chant of New Harfford, who conducts 
a large country store in the Pine 
Meadow district, was born in Barkhamsted, 
September 9, 1847, son of Horace and Louisa 
(Blakelee) Case. Mr. Case's great-grand- 
father, Simon Case, was an early settler in 
Litchfield County. His son, Obed Case, Mr. 
Case's grandfather, was a resident of Barkham- 
sted, where he successfully engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits for many years. He lived to 
the age of eighty-four years. 

Horace Case, father of Mr. Case, was born 
in Barkhamsted, and received his education 
in the district schools of his native town. He 
was reared to agricultural life, and became the 
owner of a farm in Barkhamsted, which he 
cultivated with profit for the greater part of 
his life. He was widely known as a skilful 
musician and band-master, being connected 
with different bands in the State. He was 
director of several bands in adjacent towns. 
His last public appearance as a musician was 
at the dedication of the Clark House in Win- 
sted. Mr. Case took an active interest in 
public affairs, and represented his town in the 
legislature two terms. He was made a Mason 
when twenty-two years old, and was a member 
of the fraternity for sixty years. He lived to 
the age of eighty-two. His wife, in maiden- 
hood Louisa Blakelee, was a native of Hart- 
land, daughter of Samuel Blakelee, an early 
settler in that town. She became the mother 
of four sons, as follows: C. II. Case, who for 
the past thirty years has been a well-known 
jeweller of Hartford ; Dwight, who is superin- 
tendent of the Gilbert House in Winsted ; 
Frank A., the subject of this sketch; and 
Hubert B. , a retired farmer and merchant of 
Barkhamsted. She died in Barkhamsted, aged 
forty-four years. Mr. Case's parents attended 
the Universalist church. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



9^ 



Frank A. Case commenced his education in 
the common schools of his native town. Sub- 
sequently he took a course at the Wesleyan 
Academy, and then became a clerk in a gen- 
eral store in New Hartford. After spending 
two years in this employment he took an addi- 
tional course at a business college in New 
Haven. He next secured a position as clerk 
in the large dry-goods establishment of Lord 
& Taylor in New York City, and remained 
there one year. During the succeeding four 
years he was employed as a clerk in the store 
of S. Allen in Pine Meadow, at the expiration 
of which time he went to Ohio, where he was 
engaged in selling machinery. He was absent 
one year, when he returned to Pine Meadow 
and became proprietor of a hotel known as the 
Willcox House. He carried it on for four 
years; and then, in company with his brother, 
he conducted a general store in Barkhamsted 
for eight years. At this time he bought the 
New Hartford Hotel, which after three years he 
sold, and took charge of a hotel in Tariffville 
for one year. In 1885 he once more returned 
to Pine Meadow, purchased the large general 
store in which he had worked as a boy, and has 
since continued mercantile business. He now 
conducts one of the most extensive general 
country stores in the county; and, besides the 
usual line of goods carried in such an establish- 
ment, he deals in clothing, gentlemen's fur- 
nishings, drugs, and patent medicines, with 
which he supplies a large and constantly in- 
creasing patronage. Mr. Case is prominently 
identified with public affairs in New Hartford. 
He has served as Deputy Sheriff, was in the 
legislatures of 1875 and 1879, and has been 
a member of the Board of Relief. Pressure 
of business has forced him to decline other 
important ofifices. He is a thirty-second 
degree Mason, being a member of Amos 
Beecher Lodge of New Hartford, the Colum- 



bia Chapter in Collinsville, Tyrian Council of 
Winsted, Washington Commandery of Hart- 
ford, and the Consistory and Mystic Shrine 
of Bridgeport. His brothers are also members 
of the Masonic fraternity, C. H. Case being 
advanced to the thirty-second degree. Mr. 
Case is likewise connected with the Order of 
Red Men in Winsted, and is Past Chancellor 
of the Knights of Pythias of New Hartford. 
In 1868 Mr. Case was united in marriage to 
Emma J. Willcox, only daughter of Sherman 
Willcox, who was formerly a hotel-keeper of 
Pine Meadow. Mrs. Case's grandfather was a 
well-known tavern-keeper there, and a very 
prominent man in his day. Her father was 
successful in the hotel business, and favorably 
known to the travelling public. He died at 
the age of forty-seven, and his wife died at the 
age of thirty-two. Mr. and Mrs. Case have 
two children ; namely, Hattie and Lulu B. 
Hattie was educated at the New Hartford 
High School, and was engaged in teaching for 
some time. She married Harry E. Gates, an 
undertaker of New Hartford, and has two chil- 
dren, named Catherine and Susan L. The 
family attend the Episcopal church, and Mrs. 
Case is connected with the various church 
societies. 

tLBERT G. WILSON, ex-Judge of Pro- 
bate and a prominent resident of Har- 
^^_^ winton, was born in Marion, Perry 
County, Ala., February 4, 1840, son of Sam- 
uel and Julia (Baldwin) Wilson. Mr. Wilson 
is a descendant of John Wilson, who was born 
February 7, 171 1. John Wilson's son, Eli 
Wilson, who was born November 30, 1740, 
was Judge Wilson's great-grandfather. Sam- 
uel Wilson, the grandfather, was born in Har- 
winton, December 29, 1782, and during his 
early manhood was engaged in agriculture in 
that town. He moved to New York .State, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



where he was employed in the manufacture of 
salt, and resided for a time in Syracuse. He 
finally returned to Harwinton, where he passed 
his declining years and died. He was a prom- 
inent man in the community, and a Deacon of 
the church for many years. Samuel Wilson 
married Nancy Moody, a native of Connecti- 
cut; and she became the mother of six chil- 
dren. She died in Illinois. 

Samuel Wilson, Jr., Mr. Wilson's father, 
was born in New York State, August 25, 
1805. When a young man he came to Har- 
winton, and after residing upon a farm for a 
time he moved to Alabama, where he engaged 
in mercantile business with success for many 
years. He had a farm in Harwinton, upon 
which he resided during the summer, his win- 
ters being passed in the South, attending to 
his business there. He finally abandoned 
trade, and, returning to Harwinton, resided 
there permanently until his death, which oc- 
curred October 29, 1878, aged seventy-three 
years. His wife, in maidenhood Julia Bald- 
win, who was born in Harwinton, became the 
mother of six children, of whom Albert G., 
the subject of this sketch, is the only survivor. 
Another son was in the Confederate Army dur- 
ing the Civil War, first serving in a cavalry 
regiment, and later in the ordnance depart- 
ment. The mother died in Harwinton, Sep- 
tember 16, 1876, aged seventy-one years. 

Albert G. Wilson resided in Alabama until 
he was four years of age, at which time he 
came to Harwinton, where the primary 
branches of his elementary education were re- 
ceived. After attending the public schools 
for a time he spent one year at a boarding- 
school in Orange, N.J., and completed his 
studies in Hartford, Conn. He then went to 
Texas, where he remained for three years, at 
the expiration of which time he returned to 
Harwinton and engaged in agricultural pur- 



suits upon the farm of two hundred and 
twenty-five acres formerly owned by his grand- 
father. He followed farming prosperously 
from 1862 to 1887; and then renting the prop- 
erty he removed to the village, where he has 
since resided. 

For many years he has been closely identi- 
fied with public affairs in Harwinton. He is 
a Democrat in politics. Although his party 
is in the minority, he has been elected to 
important oi^cial positions. He has been a 
member of the School Board for several years, 
was elected a Representative to the legis- 
lature in 1877, and served as Judge of Probate 
in Harwinton for two years. He has also been 
Secretary of the Torrington Creamery for two 
years, was a charter member of the Grange, of 
which he was Master for four years and is now 
Secretary. 

On March 18, 1862, Mr. Wilson was united 
in marriage to Helen Lucretia Wilson, daugh- 
ter of Lyman and Lucretia (Bull) Wilson, the 
former of whom was born in Harwinton, June 
18, 1 81 3. He was a well-known farmer, and 
died February 12, 1875, aged sixty-two years. 
His wife was born in Harwinton, April ii, 
1815, daughter of John Bull, Jr., and Dotha 
(Austin) Bull. Mrs. Albert G. Wilson is a 
direct descendant of Captain Thomas Bull, 
who was born in England in 1606. He came 
to America on the ship "Hopewell " in 1635, 
becoming a resident of Connecticut in 1636. 
He raised a family of seven children, and died 
at the age of seventy-eight. His son, Thomas 
Bull, was born in 1646, and was the father of 
John Bull, who was born in Hartford in 1696, 
and settled in Harwinton in 1733, there being 
but three or four families residing in the town 
at that time. Thomas Bull, second, died in 
Harwinton. His 80% Samuel Bull, was a 
farmer and a lifelong resident of Harwinton. 
He raised a family of ten children, and died 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in 1794, at the age of seventy-two. His son, 
John Bull, -Mrs. Wilson's great-grandfather, 
was born in 1759, and was a lifelong resident 
of Harwinton, where he followed the occupa- 
tions of shoemaker and tanner. He was a 
Captain in the Revolutionary War, and died in 
1837, aged seventy-eight. Mrs. Wilson's 
grandfather, John Bull, Jr., was born in Har- 
winton, October 10, 1786. He followed tan- 
ning and shoemaking as well as agriculture, 
and was prominently identified with public 
affairs. He was a Whig in politics, served as 
a member of the Board of Selectmen, and was 
a Representative in the legislature for three 
terms. John Bull, Jr., died at the age of 
ninety. His farm, which was a part of the 
original grant deeded to his ancestors in 1733, 
is now in the possession of the family. His 
wife was a descendant of General Wadsworth, 
who concealed the charter in the historical oak- 
tree at Hartford. Mrs. Wilson's mother, who 
still survives, has always lived in Harwinton. 
She is bright and active, possessing a great 
fund of general information, and is well ac- 
quainted with the genealogy of the principal 
families in that section. She is often con- 
sulted on matters relating to family history. 
Although she is now eighty years of age, her 
memory is good; and she has kindly furnished 
valuable data for this sketch. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert G. Wilson have had 
six children, five of whom are still living, 
namely: Helen Dotha, who attended school in 
New Britain, and is now the wife of Newman 
Hungerford, a commercial traveller of Hart- 
ford ; Anna H., formerly a school teacher, who 
married Walter B. Leavenworth, a farmer, and 
has two children— Vera W. and Lizzie Bar- 
ber; Mary B., who has been a well-known 
school teacher in Harwinton for several years; 
Julia C. and Lucy L., who reside at home; 
and Adeline, who died at the age of thirteen 



years. The family attend the Congregational 
church, of which Mrs. Wilson and her daugh- 
ters are members, and are actively engaged in 
church work. 



/^STeORGE T. JOHNSON, a druggist of 
V il I Norfolk, was born in Watertowii, 
Conn., June 29, 1853, son of David 
S. and Sbphia (Stone) Johnson. Mi". Johnson's 
grandfather, Ebenezer Johnson, was born in 
Newtown, Conn., August 13, 1775. He first' 
located in Sharon, Conn., where he resided for 
a time,: settling later in Watertown, where he 
passed 'the remainder of his life, and died May 
19, 1833. Ebenezer Johnson married Lucy 
Allen, who was born November i, 1777. She 
died in 1838, having borne her husband seven 
children; namely, Henry, John B. , William 
A., Sarah M. , David S. , Chester A., and 
George B. 

David S. Johnson, Mr. Johnson's father, 
was born in Watertown, February 16, 1808. 
He was a farmer in his early manhaed. He 
subsequently moved to the State of Texas, 
where he was engaged in mercantile business 
with his brother, and died July 14, 1861. 
His wife, whom he married September 21, 
1852, was a daughter of David Stone, of Mid- 
dlebury. She was born January 29, 1825, and 
reared a family of four children; namely, Mel- 
ville S. , Benton O., George T., and Dwight 
D. She still survives. 

George T. Johnson commenced to learn the 
business of a druggist and apothecary in 1871, 
becoming thoroughly proficient in the handling 
of drugs and the compounding of medicines. 
In 1876 he established himself in business in 
Norfolk, where he has been successful from 
the start, and is now conducting a prosperous 
trade. He carries a large and varied stock of 
drugs, chemicals, druggist's sundries, paints, 
oils, etc., and also deals in crockery ware. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Since starting in business he has erected a 
new store and residence. Mr. Johnson has 
reached his present position of prosperity by 
diligent application to business, and so win- 
ning the confidence and patronage of a large 
number of customers. He is a member of 
Western Star Lodge, No. 31, A. F. & A. M., 
of Meridian Chapter, Tyrian Council, and of 
Washington Commandery, Knights Templars. 
He is also connected with Clifton Lodge, Li- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows. 

On January i, 1879, Mr. Johnson was 
united in marriage to Annie Humphrey, 
a daughter of Deacon J. Humphrey. Mr. and 
Mrs. Johnson have three children, namely : 
Lila H., who. was born November 19, 1881 ; 
Fred J., born January 7, 1883 ; and George D., 
born December 9, 1888. Mr. Johnson is a 
Republican in politics, and represented his 
town in the legislature during the session of 
1895. The family attend the Congregational 
church. 




JRS. EDWARD H. HOLLEY, the 
leading milliner of Torrington, is 
a highly intelligent and able busi- 
ness woman, and is held in general respect 
throughout this locality, wherein she has a 
host of friends. She is a native of this State, 
born in Avon, Hartford County, which was the 
birthplace also of her father, Amos Wheeler, 
Jr., and of her paternal grandfather, Amos 
Wheeler, Sr., who died there at the age of 
forty-five years. 

The father of Mrs. Holley obtained his edu- 
cation at the common schools of Avon, and 
afterward completed his studies at the Colches- 
ter Academy. He was Postmaster of the town 
for many years, in addition to managing a 
store of general merchandise. After the 
construction of the Canal Railway he was 
appointed station agent. By the faithful 



performance of his duties in both positions 
he gave general satisfaction. In 1869 Mr. 
Wheeler disposed of his store and came to 
Torrington, which he afterward made his home 
until his decease in 1882, aged sixty years. 
He continued in mercantile occupations during 
his entire life, and was travelling salesman for 
a Hartford firm during his last years. He was 
very firm in his political opinions, which 
favored the Republican party. The maiden 
name of his wife, mother of Mrs. Holley, was 
Martha Chidsey, a native of Avon, born in 
1824, being a daughter of Jacob Chidsey, a 
highly respected citizen of that town. Mr. 
Chidsey was a man of integrity, very strict in 
regard to the observance of the Sabbath, and 
a regular attendant of the Congregational 
church. He lived to the advanced age of 
seventy-six years, retaining his faculties un- 
dimmed, and is still held in loving remem- 
brance by his grandchildren. His wife, 
grandmother of Mrs. Holley, whose maiden 
name was Martha Baldwin, was a native of 
Branford. Her father was the only one that 
returned home of the seven men of Branford 
who fought in the War of Independence. 
Mr.s. Wheeler was one of a family of four 
brothers and two sisters. She reared seven 
children, si.x of whom are now living; namely, 
Frank M., Perley W., Nellie W., Lillie (the 
wife of E. T. Coe), Homer C, and Leonard 
D. She is a valued member of the Congrega- 
tional church. 

Mrs. Edward H. Holley received her ele- 
mentary education in the common schools of 
her native town, afterward attending the New 
Britain High School. At the age of sixteen 
years, having taught school the previous year 
in Avon, she came with her parents to Tor- 
rington and completed her studies at the high 
school. After that she resumed teaching in 
this vicinity, and had been so employed for 




Mr. and Mrs. HENRY SANFORD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



i°S 



five years, when in 1876 she married Edward 
Holley. Mr. and Mrs. HoUey then went to 
Pennsylvania and lived on a farm for six 
years. They returned to Torrington in 1882, 
on the death of Mr. Holley's father, when they 
took possession of the old Holley homestead, 
where they have since resided. In 1892 Mrs. 
Holley, who has great artistic taste as well as 
business tact, opened her present millinery 
business. She has met with unqualified suc- 
cess, and has won a large patronage among the 
foremost residents of the locality. She was 
Tjrought prominently before the public a few 
years ago, when she sued the town for damages 
claimed on account of the road cut in front of 
her house. By her indomitable pluck and per- 
sistence she won her case in spite of all the 
opposition of the town, made through the best 
of legal talent obtainable. In private life Mrs. 
Holley is a true and loyal friend, a devoted 
wife, and a loving mother. 

Mr. Holley is a native of Torrington, and 
was here reared to man's estate, acquiring an 
excellent education in the high school of this 
place, in a New York school, and later finish- 
ing his studies at the Williston Seminary. 
For some years thereafter Mr. Holley was 
engaged in this vicinity and in Bridgeport as 
a dealer in boots and shoes. After his mar- 
riage he engaged in agriculture. He owned a 
fine farm, which he devoted to dairy purposes, 
manufacturing some fifteen hundred pounds of 
butter per week, and also conducting a large 
creamery. On the death of his father, Francis 
N. Holley, he returned to the home of his youth 
and invested his money in a knife shop; but, 
his health breaking down shortly after, he was 
obliged to give up active labor. 

Francis N. Holley was a native of Salis- 
bury, born May 13, 1807. In 1837 he re- 
moved to Torrington, then called Wolcottville, 
and here purchased the woollen-mills and en- 



gaged in the manufacture of doeskins. He 
was a man of prominence and influence, was 
President of the savings-bank and a member of 
the School Committee, besides serving in 
other local offices. He was active in forward- 
ing all good works designed for the benefit of 
the community. He attended the Congrega- 
tional church, was very generous in his contri- 
butions toward its support, and donated seven 
thousand dollars toward the erection of the 
new church building. He died in 1878, being 
then seventy-one years of age. He married 
Eliza Ai Hotchkiss, a native of New Hart- 
ford, born May 29, 1824. She died at the age 
of forty-two years, leaving four children, two 
of whorri are still living. Mr. and Mrs. Hol- 
ley have five beautiful children ; namely, 
Francis N., Lily W. , Lawrence H., Irving 
B., and Horace A. All are receiving the best 
of educational advantages obtainable, and a 
practical training that will enable them to 
occupy useful and honorable positions in life. 




'ENRY SANFORD, one of the oldest 
and most highly respected citizens 

^^ V^ ._, of Bridgewater, Litchfield County, 
Conn., his native place, was born on October 
14, 1806, and still occupies the farm on which 
his paternal grandfather, Nehemiah Sanford, 
Sr., settled in 1772. Mr. Sanford is a scion 
of an old New England family, whose first 
ancestor in this country was Thomas Sanford, 
who lived in Dorchester, Mass., in the early 
days of the colony, and moved in 1639 to Mil- 
ford, Conn., where both he and his wife Sarah 
died in 1681. 

Their eldest son, Ezekiel, settled in Fair- 
field, Conn., dying there in 1683, in his forty- 
ninth year. He and his wife, Rebecca Wickla 
or Wakelee, reared a son Ezekiel, who lived 
and died in Fairfield, and whose wife also bore 



io6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the Christian name of Rebecca. ■ Joseph San- 
ford, son of second Ezekiel and Rebecca San- 
ford, and great-grandfather of Henry Sanford, 
married Catherine Fairchild. Their lives 
were spent in their native town; but their son, 
Nehemiah, sought a new home, settling first 
in Redding, Conn., and in 1772 removing to 
Bridgewater, as above mentioned. He took 
possession of two hundred acres of land south- 
east of Wolf Pit Mountain, and worked 
industriously for many years, clearing and 
improving the land. Nehemiah Sanford, Sr. , 
married Elizabeth Morehouse, and they were 
the parents of the following children : Ger- 
shom ; Liffe; Phoebe, who died young; Anna; 
Catherine; and Nehemiah, Jr. 

Nehemiah Sanford, Jr., the father of the 
subject of the present sketch, was born in 
Redding, Conn., in 1762, and was the young- 
est son of his parents. He enlisted in the 
Revolutionary army when a youth of nineteen, 
and when his term of service was ended settled 
on the homestead farm, passing the rest of his 
life in Bridgewater, where he was universally 
esteemed as an upright and industrious citizen. 
An ardent supporter of the Congregational 
church, he was one of the leading me^nbers of 
the Bridgewater parish up to the time of his 
death, which occurred December 20, 1844. 
His wife, Hannah Beach Sanford, who was a 
daughter of David Beach, of Bridgewater, died 
in 1839, at the age of seventy-four. Their 
children were named: Robert, Anna, Electa, 
Garry, Beach, and Henry. 

Henry Sanford, who was the youngest son of 
his parents, received a moderate education, 
and on reaching man's estate settled on the 
home farm, caring for his father and mother in 
their last days. .He took up the work of agri- 
culture with zest and pursued it with ability, 
making many improvements on the estate, 
remodelling the house, which was built by his 



father in 1786, until it was almost like new, 
and erecting new barns and other buildings. 
He is one of the thriftiest farmers in the com- 
munity, and though eighty-nine years of age 
attends to business every day in the week. A 
man of strong convictions and decided charac- 
ter, he is bold and fearless in the performance 
of duty ; and it is rare to find a man better 
posted on political subjects or agricultural 
matters. 

December 4, 1828, Mr. Sanford was married 
to Anna J., daughter of Daniel Canfield, of 
Bridgewater. She died March 10, 1844, and 
was laid beside her first child, Canfield H., 
who was born July 28, 1839, and died August 
17 of the same year. She was the mother of 
one other child, Horace N., who was born Jan- 
uary 4, 1 84 1, and grew to maturity, working 
on the farm with his father. He enlisted in 
1862 in Company H, Nineteenth Regiment of 
Connecticut Volunteers, and served three 
years, being promoted to the rank of Sergeant 
in the Second Connecticut Artillery. At the 
end of his term of service he returned to the 
homestead, and was for many years a promi- 
nent citizen of the town and a Deacon in the 
Congregational church. He died September 
S, 1889. He married Dora M., daughter of 
George and Lucretia M. (Turner) Kasson, of 
Bethlehem, Conn., and was the father of three 
children, namely: Genevieve T., born March 
18, 1872, a popular and successful school 
teacher; Henry C, born April 16, 1875; and 
Mabelle F., born April 29, 1879, who lives 
on the homestead with her mother and grand- 
parents. The marriage of Mr. Henry Sanford 
and Polly B. Piatt, daughter of Deacon Sim- 
eon Piatt, of South Britain, took place on No- 
vember 12, 184s; and their golden wedding 
was celebrated on November 12, 1895, the 
pleasant occasion being one long to be remem- 
bered in Bridgewater. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



107 



In politics Mr. Sanford is a Republican. 
He has been prominent as a town official, and 
in religious matters especially has taken an 
active part, having been identified with the 
Congregational church since he was twenty- 
one years old. He rarely misses a service, 
and his life is consistent with the teachings in 
which he has so long believed. 

On a neighboring page may be seen a por- 
trait of this venerable gentleman, who is now 
in his ninetieth year, his mind enriched with 
a wealth of garnered memories of blessings 
enjoyed and labors done. 



(5 I HEODORE SEDGWICK GOLD, a 
g I prominent citizen of West Cornwall, is 
a native of Madison, N.Y., born on 
March 2, 18 18, son of Dr. Samuel Wadswoi;;th 
and Phebe (Cleveland) Gold. His genealogy 
is traced back through seven generations to the 
Hon. Nathan Gold, the first representative of 
the family in America. Nathan Gold was 
one of the nineteen petitioners who received 
the charter of Connecticut. His four children 
were: Nathan, Jr., Sarah, Deborah, and Abi- 
gail. Nathan Gold, Jr., first married Miss 
Hannah Talcott, a daughter of Lieutenant 
Colonel John Talcott. She died in 1696, 
leaving six children, as follows: Abigail, 
John, Nathan, Samuel, Joseph, and Hezekiah. 
Three other children, Onesimus, David, and 
Martha, were by a second wife, Sarah. Heze- 
kiah Gold, who was born in 1694, graduated 
at Harvard in 17 19, studied for the ministry, 
and became a successful preacher at Stratford. 
His death occurred in 1761. He married 
Miss Mary Ruggles, daughter of the Rev. 
Thomas Ruggles, of Guilford, Conn. At the 
time of her death, in 1750, she was but forty- 
eight years of age. They were the parents 
of thirteen children; namely, Mary, Katie, 



Jerusha, Sarah, Hezekiah, Jr., Thomas, Anna, 
Rebecca, Huldah, Anna, Catherine, Abigail, 
and Elizabeth. 

Hezekiah Gold, Jr., who was born in Strat- 
ford, Conn., on January 18, 1731, was edu- 
cated at Yale College, from which he gradu- 
ated in the class of 1751. He was the first of 
the family to settle in Cornwall, Litchfield 
County, where he died May 30, 1790. He 
was thrice married, the first time on Novem- 
ber 23, 1758, to Miss Sarah Sedgwick, daugh- 
ter of Deacon Benjamin Sedgwick, of Corn- 
wall. She died August 18, 1766, when but 
twenty-seven years old, having had five chil- 
dren; namely, Thomas, Hezekiah, Benjamin, 
Thomas R., and Hezekiah (second). The 
Rev. Hezekiah Gold's second wife was Eliza- 
beth (Wakeman) Gold, a daughter of Joseph 
Wakeman, of Fairfield. She died on Febru- 
ary II, 1778, at thirty-three years of age, 
leaving a son and two daughters: Joseph, 
Sarah, and Mary. For his third wife he mar- 
ried Miss Abigail Sherwood, of Fairfield, 
Conn. Hezekiah Gold (second), who was 
born on August i, 1766, spent his life in 
Cornwall. His death occurred in 1847 on 
the anniversary of Washington's birthday, 
aged eighty-one years six months and twenty- 
one days. He married Miss Rachel Wads- 
worth, a daughter of Samuel Wadsworth, Oc- 
tober 24, 1788; and the fruit of their union 
was a son and three daughters, as follows: 
Sally Maria, Samuel Wadsworth, Julia R-, 
and Lorain Sedgwick. 

Samuel W. Gold, the father of Theodore 
Sedgwick, was born in Cornwall, on Septem- 
ber 27, 1794. He graduated from Williams 
College in 1814, studied medicine at Pitts- 
field and Yale, and began the practice of med- 
icine in Madison, N.Y., and in 1824 opened 
an office in Goshen, Conn., where he followed 
his profession for fifteen years. He took a 



io8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



keen interest in public affairs. During two 
sessions of the State legislature he filled the 
office of Senator, and in 1857 he served as 
a Presidential elector. His wife, Phebe 
Cleveland, was a daughter of Erastus Cleve- 
land, of Madison, N.Y. They were married 
April 17, 1817; and their union was blessed 
by the birth of a son and two daughters: 
Theodore Sedgwick, Mary E., and Julia Lo- 
rain. The father died September 10, 1869, 
and his wife's death occurred on the 29th of 
the following November, seventy-three years 
of age. 

Theodore S. Gold came with his parents 
from Madison, N.Y., to Cornwall when he 
was a small child. He received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of Cornwall, and 
later attended Goshen Academy and Yale 
College, from which he graduated in the class 
of 1838. He was one of the editors of the 
Connecticut Homestead as long as it was pub- 
lished at Hartford, Conn.; and in 1878 he 
published a history of Cornwall. He has al- 
ways given considerable time and attention to 
agricultural pursuits and interests, and at the 
present time owns about eight hundred acres 
of land in Cornwall. On September 13, 
1843, he was joined in marriage with Miss 
Caroline E. Lockwood, daughter of Charles 
and Eunice Lockwood, of Bridgeport. She 
died April 25, 1857, in the thirty-second year 
of her age, leaving five children, as follows: 
Eleanor Douglas, who married Charles H. 
Hubbard, of Sandusky, Ohio; Mary Eliza- 
beth; Emily Sedgwick; Rebecca Cleveland, 
wife of Samuel M. Cornell, of Brooklyn, 
N. Y.; and Caroline Simons, wife of William 
F. Gibson, of San Francisco, Cal. Two years 
later, on April 4, 1859, Mr. Gold formed a 
second union with Mrs. Emma (Tracy) Bald- 
win, daughter of A. W. Tracy, of Rockville, 
Conn. They have four children: Alice 



Tracy, who married Franz Ulrich von Putt- 
kamer, a relative of Prince Bismarck; Martha- 
Wadsworth, wife of Colin D. Morgan, of 
Montreal ; Charles Lockwood ; and James 
Douglas, the latter a successful physician of 
Bridegport, Conn., who married Miss Ger- 
trude House. 

Mr. Gold was one of the founders of the 
State Agricultural Society, and has been offi- 
cially connected with it since its organization 
in 1854. In 1866 the State Board of Agricult- 
ure was established, Mr. Gold being elected 
Secretary, which office he still holds. He is 
a member of the Board of Control of the State 
Agricultural Experiment Station in New 
Haven, Conn. From the establishment of 
Storr's School and Agricultural College he 
has been a member of the Board of Trustees, 
and is now Secretary. Mr. Gold in connec- 
tion with his father established in 1845 the 
Cream Hill Agricultural School, which was 
successfully conducted for twenty-four years. 
In 1864, with the aid of the other incorpora- 
tors, he obtained from the General Assembly 
a charter for the Connecticut Soldiers' Orphan 
Home at Mansfield; and during the mainte- 
nance of this institution till 1874 Mr. Gold 
held the office of Secretary of the corporation. 
He is also a member of the Connecticut His- 
torical Society, of which he is one of the 
Vice-Presidents, a member of the Sons of the 
American Revolution, a fellow of the American 
Association for the Advancement of Science, 
a life member of both the American Forestry 
Association and the American Pomological 
Society; and he is connected with Patrons 
of Husbandry and various other organiza- 
tions. In religious belief Mr. Gold is a 
Congregationalist. For many years he has 
served as Deacon in the church at Cornwall, 
and is at present chairman of the society's 
committee. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



log 



B 



EACON HENRY B. BISSELL, one 
of the most respected and prosperous 
agriculturists of tiiis section of the 
county, resides on his valuable and well-kept 
homestead on Maple Street, Litchfield, about 
three miles from the village. He has the dis- 
tinction of being one of the oldest native-born 
residents of the town, having first opened his 
eyes to the 'light on a farm adjoining the one 
on which he now lives, April lo, .1814. He 
comes of pioneer ancestry, his grea.t-grand- 
father, Zebulon Bissell, who spent his early 
years in Union, where he was born in 1724, 
having been one of the original settlers of 
Litchfield. Zebulon Bissell bought land from 
the government, and in the midst of the path- 
less wilderness erected the log cabin that was 
the first, home of himself and young wife. 
Benjamin Bissell, the grandfather of Deacon 
Bissell, was born on the paternal homestead 
June 15, 1754, and, as he grew to manhood, 
assisted his father in clearing and cultivating 
the land. He was occupied in agriculture 
throughout his life, being one of the well- 
to-do farmers of this locality. He married 
when young; and, of his children, Nathaniel, 
born in 1786, was the father of Deacon 
Bissell. 

Nathaniel Bissell was a lifelong resident of 
Litchfield, and, like his ancestors, was a tiller 
of the soil. On coming of age he bought land 
adjacent to the farm now owned by Deacon 
Bissell, and in its care and management spent 
the remainder of his eighty-six years of life. 
A man of sterling worth and character, he was 
greatly esteemed by all, and was actively in- 
terested in advancing the material welfare of 
his native town and county. In politics he 
was a Whig, and at one time served as grand 
juror. He married Anna Smith, one of the 
four children of Captain Daniel Smith. Cap- 
tain Smith was a farmer of Middlebury, and 



lived to the venerable age of ninety years. 
Nathaniel Bissell and his wife' had seven chil- 
dren, four of whom are yet living; namely, 
Charles, Henry B., Frederick, and Julia. 
The last-named is the wife of William Ensign. 

Deacon Henry B. Bissell had better educa- 
tional advantages than were generally given a 
farmer's son in his time. After finishing with 
the district schools he was sent to the semi- 
nary, where he was under the instruction of 
John P. Brace. He subsequently engaged in 
teaching, which he continued for six winters. 
His chief occupation, however, was assisting 
on the home farm, where he remained until 
twenty-eight years of age. Having by that 
time much experience in general farming he 
then bought the property on which he now 
resides. Since that time he has placed the 
two hundred and thirty acres of fertile land in 
a yielding condition and made many other val- 
uable improvements, sparing neither time nor 
expense for that purpose. In 1850 Deacon 
Bissell erected his present residence, which 
stands on rising ground overlooking the village 
three miles distant, the granite used in its 
construction having been quarried on his own 
farm. He pays a good deal of attention to 
dairying, keeping some twenty head of fine 
cows, and finds this branch of his business 
quite profitable. 

In 1 841 Deacon Bissell married Clarissa 
M., daughter of Captain Samuel Wright, one 
of the early settlers of Litchfield. Of the 
nine children born to them, seven grew to 
adult life; namely, Lewis, Philip, Samuel, 
Alice, Francis, Cornelia, and Amelia, the fol- 
lowing being chronicled of them : Lewis, who 
is a veteran of the Civil War, is now a car- 
penter in Syracuse, N.Y., and is married to 
Clara Aldridge, by whom he is the father of 
one child, Carl. Philip died at the age of 
thirty-six years ; and Samuel died when forty 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



years old. Alice married F. Germond, by 
whom she has had four children: Henry B. , 
James H., Gertrude, and Paul. Francis, who 
lives with his father on the old homestead, 
married Myra Piper, and has three children : 
Arthur, Frederick F. , and Clarissa I. Cor- 
nelia is the wife of Arthur Edwards, a neigh- 
boring farmer, and has two children : Henry 
H. and Ruth. Amelia and Cornelia are twins. 
In 1892 Mrs. Bissell, the devoted wife and 
mother, after a wedded life of more than fifty 
years, passed from this life, at the age of 
seventy-three years. She was an active Chris- 
tian and an esteemed member of the Congrega- 
tional church, of which her husband has served 
as Deacon for many years. In politics the 
Deacon is a stanch Republican. No man in 
the community stands higher in the public es- 
timation than Deacon Bissell, his entire life 
having been marked by those noble and upright 
principles that are most desirable in a good 
and loyal citizen. 




jDWARD L. LORRAIN, a successful 
building contractor of Canaan, was born 
in France, February 14, 1843, son of 
John and Mary (Mundry) Lorrain. Both par- 
ents were natives of France. Mr. Lorrain's 
father, who was a wheelwright by trade, emi- 
grated to the United States in 1847, and set- 
tled in East Canaan, where he became con- 
nected with the Barnum & Richardson 
Company, with whom he remained for thirty- 
five years. He died in Florida at the age of 
sixty years. His wife, Mary Mundry, became 
the mother of six children, of whom three are 
now living, namely: Edward L. , the subject 
of this sketch; Isabella, now Mrs. McCarty; 
and Paul J. Mrs. John Lorrain died in 1862, 
at the age of forty years. 

Edward L. Lorrain was educated in the 



schools of East Canaan, and at the age of 
twenty years commenced to learn the carpen- 
ter's trade. After completing his apprentice- 
ship he followed his trade as journeyman for 
a time, and subsequently commenced business 
for himself as a contractor and builder. Being 
a thoroughly skilled workman and possessing 
besides a considerable knowledge of architect- 
ure, he is able both to furnish and execute 
plans for any kind of building. He has ac- 
quired an enviable reputation, and is at the 
present time engaged in fulfilling a large con- 
tract for the erection of some fancy stock 
stables in Great Barrington. He also fur- 
nishes plans for buildings outside of his opera- 
tions as contractor, and is well known as a 
capable architect. He is a member of Hoosa- 
tonic Lodge, A. F. & A. M. ; and in politics 
he is a Democrat. In 1868 Mr. Lorrain was 
united in marriage to Sarah E. Crocker, daugh- 
ter of Milo Crocker, of Lebanon, N. Y. They 
have two children, namely: John E., who 
married Mary Goodwin, and has two children, 
named May and Bessie, respectively ; and 
Sarah E. Mr. Lorrain occupies a fine resi- 
dence on Prospect Hill. 



KESSENDEN IVES, a retired farmer, 
spending the sunset years of his busy 
life in the village of Litchfield, widely 
known as an honest man and a good citizen, 
has been identified with the agricultural prog- 
ress of this part of Connecticut for the past 
half-century and more. He was born August 
17, 1826, in the town of Goshen, and there 
bred and educated. 

He comes from a race of farmers, and is of 
pioneer stock, his grandfather, Asa Ives, hav- 
ing been an early settler of Goshen. He 
bought a tract of "college land," which was 
then in its virgin wildness; and from this he 




FESSENDEN IVES. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



113 



labored unceasingly to improve a homestead, 
and was largely instrumental in developing 
the resources of the town. He cleared a 
large part of the land, placing it in a tillable 
condition, and there lived until his demise, 
being then a venerable, white-haired man, of 
fourscore and ten years. This farm is still 
in the possession of the Ives family, being 
owned by the widow of one of his grandsons. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Sally 
Marks, bore him four children, three sons and 
one daughter; namely, Eben, Luther, Lev- 
erett, and Sarah. The latter married Amos 
Johnson, of Cornwall, her only descendant 
now living being a son, Marion, a resident of 
Iowa. The grandmother also attained a good 
old age,, living to celebrate her eightieth 
birthday. 

Leverett Ives, son of Asa, was born in the 
town of Goshen in 1796, and was reared to a 
farmer's life. He at length assumed the 
management of the homestead property, tak- 
ing care of his parents in their old age. At 
the time of his marriage he built a house near 
the dwelling in which he was born, making 
that his home until a few years prior to his 
decease, when he removed to Canaan, where 
he passed his last years, dying December 7, 
1877, at the home of his daughter Mary, who 
married Nelson Clark. Leverett Ives was a 
very enterprising farmer, greatly respected, 
and was ever active in advancing the interests 
of his native town. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Huldah Holbrook, was born in 
Mendon, Mass., daughter of a well-to-do 
farmer of that town, being one of a family of 
eight children, all of whom grew to maturity. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leverett Ives had a family of 
ten children, nine of whom grew to years, of 
discretion, namely: Alderman, who lived to 
the age of sixty-eight years; Fessenden, of 
whom we write; Sabin; Everardus and 



Bogardus, twins, both deceased, the former at 
the age of fifty years, and the latter when 
a boy of ten; Hubert, who passed away in 
1868, aged thirty-five years; Mary E. (Mrs. 
Nelson Clark), of Canaan; Henry H., who 
departed this life at the age of twoscore years; 
and Florene, who became the wife of A. G. 
Stephens. The mother long survived her 
husband, joining him in the bright world be- 
yond in September, 1893, at the venerable 
age of eighty-nine years. She was a woman 
of sincere piety, a devoted member of the 
Methodist church, which she and her husband 
joined in their younger days. 

Fessenden Ives grew to man's estate on the 
parental homestead, and in his youthful days 
received all the educational advantages the 
town afforded. For a few years after leaving 
school he was engaged in teaching in the 
winter season and assisting his father during 
seed-time and harvest. Having concluded to 
follow in the footsteps of his ancestors as re- 
garded his life occupation, Mr. Ives purchased 
in 185 1 one hundred and sixty-seven acres of 
land, and began farming on his own account. 
He was successful from the first, and in 
course of time bought another small piece of 
land, and having erected good buildings con- 
tinued the pursuit of agriculture for forty -four 
years. He made substantial improvements on 
his property, clearing the land, putting in a 
complete system of drainage, placing the 
larger part of it under cultivation, carrying 
on his labors after the most approved methods 
of agriculture. In addition to mixed hus- 
bandry Mr. Ives made a specialty of stock- 
raising, keeping a herd of grade Jersey cows 
and making an excellent quality of butter, 
which he disposed of at the highest market 
price. In April, 1895, Mr. Ives sold this 
valuable farm to his son, Fessenden L. Ives, 
who is keeping up the reputation the father 



114 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



had well earned by years of diligent and faith- 
ful toil as one of the most practical and suc- 
cessful agriculturists of Goshen. 

On November 20, 1850, Mr. Ives wedded 
Mary Cook, one of ten children born to Thad- 
deus and Susan (Wiley) Cook. Her father, 
a well-known farmer of Shefifield, Mass., died 
at the early age of forty-four years, when she 
was but two years old. Mrs. Cook lived to 
the age of sixty-eight years, spending her last 
days in Sheffield, Mrs. Ives being the only 
survivor of this large family. Of the nine 
children born to the household of Mr. and 
Mrs. Ives only four grew to adult life, a brief 
record of whom is as follows: Thaddeus, the 
owner of a farm lying near the old homestead 
in Goshen, married Mary H. Pratt, a daugh- 
ter of Edwin Pratt, of this town, and they 
have six children — Chester F., Ray H., Alice 
H., Edwin R., Thaddeus C, and Mary L. ; 
George C, the owner of a creamery in Tor- 
rington, married Lucy C. Luddington, and 
they have one child — Frances; Fessenden 
L., who lives on the parental homestead, mar- 
ried Ellora M. Kimberly, daughter of Sher- 
man Kimberly, of Goshen, and they have one 
child — Fessenden E. ; Mary J., who married 
Courtland F. Ives, a farmer in Ohio, died in 
1894, aged forty years. These children all 
had good educational advantages, the eldest 
son having attended the State Normal School 
at New Britain and the others having taken a 
course of study at the Goshen Academy. 

In his politics Mr. Ives is a straight Re- 
publican, and has taken an active part in local 
affairs, having served as Selectman twelve 
years, the major portion of the time being 
chairman of the board, and also at one time 
was a member of the Board of Relief. In 
1875 he creditably represented his town in 
the State legislature. He has been ap- 
pointed trustee of different estates, and has 



served as administrator of many, bis ability 
and integrity being unquestioned. He was a 
charter member of the Litchfield Grange, and 
has been its Treasurer since its organization 
in 1888, the society having now a membership 
of one hundred and seventy-five. Mr. Ives 
and his family are regular attendants of the 
Congregational church. 

A faithful likeness of Mr. Ives occupies a 
preceding page of this volume. 




iRS. JULIETTE A. STRONG, a 
lady in high standing in Winsted, 
is the widow of the late Clark 
Strong, who was a prominent manufacturer of 
that town. He was the son of John Strong 
and grandson of David Strong, both of 
Chatham, Conn., the latter a farmer and an 
innkeeper. Clark Strong, when completing 
his education at the Monson Academy, met 
there the lady who afterward became his wife 
and is the subject of this sketch. After his 
marriage he settled in St. Louis, where he 
was a teacher for some time, and later was 
called to a professorship at Westminster 
College, Fulton, Mo. At the breaking out of 
the Civil War the college was closed, as 
there was some fighting in that vicinity; and 
Mr. Strong returned to his father's home at 
East Hampton, Conn. In the following year 
he enlisted for nine months in the Twenty- 
fourth Connecticut Infantry, serving as Ad- 
jutant. He was under the command of 
General Banks in the first engagement at Port 
Hudson, and while delivering an order re- 
ceived a gunshot wound, which was so serious 
as to necessitate a stay of three months in the 
hospital at New Orleans. When convalescent 
he came home on furlough, the regiment re- 
turning one month later. Soon after the close 
of the war Mr. Strong, in company with his 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



"5 



brothei- David, who had served in the war 
with him, holding the rank of Lieutenant, 
took up the manufacture of cofifin trimmings 
in East Hampton, beginning on a small scale. 
Within two years they moved to Winsted, 
and built a large factory, where a thriving 
business has since been carried on. For five 
years prior to his death Mr. Strong was in 
poor health, and travelled in Colorado and the 
South in the hope of obtaining relief. He 
died at his home in Winsted, July 15, 1878. 
His marriage took place in 1853. He be- 
longed to the Republican -party, but was not 
in the political arena. 

Mrs. Strong is the daughter of David and 
Asenath (Smith) Lewis, both of Massachu- 
setts, but residents for some time of Stillman 
Valley, near Rockford, 111., where Mr. Lewis 
was engaged in farming. They made the long 
journey thither, more than a thousand miles, 
over the rough country, in emigrant wagons. 
On the way they passed through Chicago, 
when it was little more than a mud-hole. In 
Stillman Valley, a very fine farming country, 
Mr. Lewis bought some six hundred acres of 
land, and settled there with some twenty other 
families, among whom were the Rev. Eben- 
ezer Brown, a Congregational preacher, who 
became pastor of the First Church, Willard 
Andrews and wife, and a brother of Mr. 
Lewis. After some years of pioneer life Mr. 
Lewis sold his farm, and in 1852 moved to 
Rockford, where he engaged in the manufact- 
ure of cornstarch. Subsequently a fire de- 
stroyed his buildings, and the financial panic 
further reduced his resources. In conse- 
quence Mr. and Mrs. Lewis, now well ad- 
vanced in years, came to East Winsted with 
their daughter. The mother died in 1877, 
at the age of seventy-seven, and .the father in 
1884, at the age of eighty-nine. They had 
three children: L. M. Lewis, deceased, who 



was a farmer in Stillman Valley, Abbie, 
wife of Philetus Fales in Ottawa, Kan. ; and 
Mrs. Strong. 

Mrs. Juliette A. Strong was but four years 
old when she went with her parents to Illi- 
nois. She grew up among the hardships of 
pioneer life. She, however, completed her 
education at Monson Academy, after which 
she taught for some time in Rockford, 111., 
where she later married Mr. Strong. After 
her marriage she went to St. Louis with her 
husband, and came East with him at the break- 
ing out of the war. She has lost four chil- 
dren, two of whom died in infancy. Lewis 
D., her oldest son, died in 1876, when but 
twenty years old, a promising young man, 
who had distinguished himself as a student 
and was just starting in business. Gertrude 
S. married W. F. McClelland, and resides in 
Denver, Col. She has one daughter, Juliette, 
so named after her grandmother. Lester 
Clark Strong married Antoinette Loomis, of 
Winsted, and has one son. Mrs. Strong 
since her husband's death has held his inter- 
est in the business, with the efificient aid of 
her son Lester. Her home is at 100 Main 
Street, where her husband died. 




EORGE STANLY BURNHAM, a 
'3 1 well-known resident of Winchester 
and identified with the best interests 
of this section of the State, is a native of this 
county, born January 4, 1830, in the town of 
Barkhamsted, on the homestead of his father, 
Hiram Burnham. Mr. Burnham represents 
one of the earliest families to settle in Con- 
necticut. He is a descendant of one Thomas 
Burnham, who bought land in Hartford from 
the Indians, and was subsequently one of the 
most extensive land-owners of his day. (A 
comprehensive history of the Burnham family. 



ii6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



compiled and published by Roderick Burnham 
in 1884, may prove of interest to the readers 
of this volume.) The paternal grandfather of 
the subject, also named Thomas Burnham, 
was born at East Hartford, and, after his 
marriage to Chloe Fairchild, moved to Hart- 
land, where he was soon numbered among the 
most enterprising and skilful business men of 
the place. He engaged in several occupa- 
tions, being a carder, a cloth-dresser, the 
owner and manager of a saw-mill, and an ex- 
tensive farmer. In the sunset of his life he 
removed to Ravenna, Portage County, Ohio, 
that he might spend his last days with his 
son. 

Hiram Burnham was reared to man's estate 
in his native town. After his marriage he 
resided for a short time in Bloomfield, and 
then removed to Barkhamsted, where he 
bought a partly improved farm, which he suc- 
cessfully conducted until 1853. In this year 
he removed to the vicinity of Winsted, where 
he and his wife subsequently died. He was 
prominent in political affairs, was a stanch 
Whig, and represented his district in the 
State legislature. His wife in maidenhood 
was Hannah Clerene Sanford, daughter of 
Strong Sanford, an officer in the Revo- 
lutionary army. After the close of that 
memorable war Strong Sanford married Tem- 
perance Hotchkiss; and they settled in this 
county, where they reared their children. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hiram Burnham reared but two 
of the three children born to them, namely: 
George Stanly, the subject of this sketch; 
and Laura Clerene, who married John Wood- 
ford, of Winsted. Mary Jane died, aged six 
years. 

George S. Burnham received his early edu- 
cation in the district school, and subsequently 
attended the academies of Warren, Mass., and 
of Granby, Conn. At the age of eighteen years 



he began his professional career by teaching 
during the winter season for some ten years, 
the remainder of each year being spent in 
farming or travelling. In his travels he 
visited the States of New York, Ohio, and 
Pennsylvania. Mr. Burnham was subse- 
quently associated with his father in farming. 
A year later he assumed the entire manage- 
ment of the homestead property, engaging ex- 
tensively in dairying. With another man he 
carried on a cheese factory in South Street, 
Winchester, for four years, after which he 
sent his milk to the condensing factory for 
two years. In 1874 he removed from his na- 
tive town to Winsted, and for three years was 
engaged in a mercantile business, dealing 
largely in wool, generally selling in the New 
York markets. In 1877 he purchased the 
Elmwood farm, located on the side hill, 
three-fourths of a mile from Winsted post- 
office, and occupying a beautiful site, over- 
looking the village of Winsted and the 
surrounding country. 

The union of Mr. Burnham and Mary C. 
Crampton was celebrated in the month of De- 
cember, 1864. She was born in Farmington, 
Conn., a daughter of William Crampton, who 
was a prosperous farmer and a dealer in pro- 
visions and lumber. He was a stanch mem- 
ber of the old Whig party, and was very 
prominent in local affairs. He served as 
Justice of the Peace for many years, and rep- 
resented the town of Farmington in the State 
legislature. He married Esther Cowles, pf 
that town, a daughter of Rufus and Rachel 
(Moss) Cowles; and they had seven children, 
namely: Rufus C, Thomas, DeWitt, Rachel, 
Mary (Mrs. Burnham), Elizabeth, and Ada- 
line. Rufus, the eldest, was graduated from 
Yale College, and was for a long time Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics and Astronomy at the 
Illinois College in Jacksonville, where he 











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EDWARD C. HOTCHKISS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



119 



subsequently died. The union of Mr. and 
Mrs. Burnham has been blessed by the birth 
of three children : Alice Sanford, Isabella 
Grace, and George Nelson. The latter is a 
commercial traveller, representing a Hartford 
firm; and Alice S., who was the wife of Pro- 
fessor James Bingham, formerly of Winsted, 
but now a teacher at the Tillotson Institute 
at Austin, Tex., died at the home of her 
parents, November 8, 1895, leaving a baby 
girl two weeks old. Mr. Burnham is held in 
high regard by his fellow-townsmen, and his 
influence and assistance are always sought in 
behalf of undertakings for the benefit of the 
general public. In him the Republican party 
finds a strong ally. He has served as chair- 
man of the Board of Relief. He was also one 
of the organizers of the First National Bank 
of Winsted, and has since been a Director and 
much of the time an Auditor. At present 
he is Overseer of the Still River Grange, in 
which he has served as Chaplain and Treas- 
urer. Both he and his wife are active and 
valued members of the First Congregational 
Church. He has acted as chairman of the 
society for a number of years, and for a 
quarter of a century he has been a teacher jji 
the Sunday-school. 




JDWARD C. HOTCHKISS, of Torring- 
ton, Conn., senior member of the firm 
of Hotchkiss Brothers & Co., con- 
tractors and builders, was born in Naugatuck, 
New Haven County, Conn., November 5, 
1833. He is a son of Charles and Electa 
(Brace) Hotchkiss, and comes of a noted fam- 
ily of builders, both his father and grand- 
father having been largely engaged in carpen- 
try. The grandfather. Dyer Hotchkiss, was 
born in Prospect, Conn., and spent most of 
his Life in Naugatuck, where he owned a saw- 



mill and manufactured lumber for his building 
operations. 

Charles Hotchkiss worked as a journeyman 
carpenter in his youth, in early manhood as- 
suming the responsibility of an independent 
builder. In 1841 he left Naugatuck, and 
settled in a part of Torrington which was 
then an unreclaimed wilderness. There he 
cleared a tract of land, and erecting a saw- 
mill was soon actively engaged in the manu- 
facture of lumber, at the same time doing 
some building. In 1857 he sold his saw-mill 
property, and establishing the plant now man- 
aged by his sons became prominent and well- 
known as a builder throughout the district, and 
gained a reputation for good workmanship and 
prompt execution that has aided much in the 
success of the present firm. He successfully 
conducted business until 1880, when he sold 
his interest to his sons, and retired. He is 
now in his eighty-fifth year, and is still ac- 
tive and in" possession of his faculties. His 
wife, formerly Electa; Brace, who died in 
1888, was a native of Torrington, and was one 
of six children, two of whom are still living. 
Her father, Harland Brace, was a cooper by 
trade. Mrs. Charles Hotchkiss was a mem- 
ber of the Congregational church, of which 
her husband was Deacon for many years. 
Their union was blessed by seven children, 
five of whom are living, namely: Edward C. 
and Henry, of Torrington; Albert, of New 
York; Fidelia, wife of Hiram Clemons; and 
Eugene. 

Edward C. Hotchkiss was seven years of 
age when the family moved to Torrington. 
He here received his education, and learned 
the carpenter's trade with his father. At 
seventeen he displayed such ability and dis- 
cretion that he was intrusted with authority 
to act as foreman, taking charge of important 
contracts. He subsequently became a mem- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ber of the firm, the name from 1856 to 1866 
being C. Hotchkiss & Son. In 1866 his 
brother Henry was admitted, and "Son" was 
changed to "Sons." In 1880 Edward and 
Henry purchased their father's interest, and up 
to 1888 the business was conducted under the 
name of Hotchkiss Brothers. Pt has yearly 
increased, and the reputation of the firm is 
such as to retain old customers and to con- 
stantly add to the list of new ones. Besides 
being constantly engaged in filling contracts 
for building, they deal largely in building ma- 
terial; and they are the largest manufacturers 
of sashes, blinds, and doors in the State, giv- 
ing continuous employment in their factory 
and yard to one hundred men. Edward C. 
Hotchkiss is also an architect, and is very 
skilful in drawing plans. 

In 1856 he married Amelia Briggs, of Sara- 
toga, N.Y., whose father was a farmer and 
butcher in that town. Mrs. Amelia B. Hotch- 
kiss was one of fourteen children. She died 
in 1 88 1, at the age of forty-seven, leaving 
three children, namely: Edward H., who in 
1888 became associated in business with his 
father, the name of the firm being changed on 
his account to Hotchkiss Brothers & Co. ; 
Josephine, wife of Harlow Pease, of Stock- 
bridge, superintendent of the building busi- 
ness of his father-in-law; and Minnie, wife 
of C. H. Dougal, a druggist in Torrington. 
Mr. Hotchkiss subsequently married Mrs. 
H. R. Fellows, of Torrington, daughter of 
Emory Coe, of Winsted. She was educated at 
Ipswich, Mass., and taught school for twenty 
years, for fifteen years being thus engaged in 
Torrington. 

Politically, Mr. Hotchkiss is a Republican. 
He cast his first vote for John C. Fremont, 
walking ten miles in order to deposit his bal- 
lot. He was in the State legislature in 1871 
and 1875, and in Torrington served as Select- 



man two years, was on the Board of Burgesses 
two years, and was many years a member 
of the Board of Relief. He is a member of 
the Masonic fraternity, belonging to Seneca 
Lodge of Torrington, Cyrus Chapter of Royal 
Arch Masons, Clark Commandery of Water- 
bury, and Pyramid Temple of Bridgeport, the 
only one in the State. He attends the Con- 
gregational church, to which his first wife be- 
longed, and of which his second wife also is a 
member. Mr. Hotchkiss is a broadly intelli- 
gent man, and is regarded with esteem and re- 
spect by all who know him. His portrait 
appears on another page. 



/STeORGE p. ward, a well-known 
y_5T and successful business man of 
Litchfield County, was born August 
24, 1844, in Riverton, Hartford County. 
His ancestors were for many generations 
among the most worthy residents of York- 
shire, England, where his father, Michael P. 
Ward, and his grandfather, John Ward, were 
both born and bred. 

The grandfather remained in Yorkshire sev- 
eral years after his marriage with Miss Parker, 
who bore him six children; namely, James, 
Ellen, Michael P., Alice, Isabelle, and 
Charles. In 1828 he emigrated to America, 
and settled in North Adams, Mass., living 
thereuntil 1836. In that year he moved to 
Hartland, Hartford County, where he pur- 
chased a tract of land from Ezra Doolittle. 
The property was situated on the west side of 
the west branch of the Farmington River, 
and included a valuable water-power and a 
saw-mill, it being one of the oldest improved 
estates in that locality. In the fall of 1836, 
assisted by his sons, all of whom came to this 
country, he began the erection of a calico- 
mill, which he completed and put in opera- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



121 



tion the following year. His sons were in 
company with him; and under the firm name 
of John Ward & Sons they continued the man- 
ufacture of calicoes until 1851, when he retired 
to his farm, which he thereafter superintended 
until his death, at the venerable age of eighty- 
two years. After the death of his first wife 
he married a.gain, but of this union there 
were no children. 

Michael P. Ward, father of George P. 
Ward, preceded his father to the United 
States, coming here in 1825, being then a 
venturesome youth of sixteen years. He 
made the voyage in a sailing-vessel, the trip 
occupying several weeks. He first secured 
work at Hudson, N.Y., in a calico-mill, 
where he was soon made superintendent, re- 
maining there until 1833. He then went to 
North Adams, Mass., and with his brother 
James leased a mill, and bought the stock; 
and for three years they were sucessfully en- 
gaged in the manufacture of calico. In 1836 
he accompanied his father and brothers to 
Riverton, where he was associated with them 
in business until 1851. In that year he 
bought the Williams & Burbank Scythe Com- 
pany's mills, located at the junction of the 
Farmington and Still Rivers, ^nd forming a 
stock company, of which he was the President, 
Secretary, and Treasurer for a number of 
years, engaged in the manufacture of scythes. 
He finally retired from the management, and 
devoted his time to his private interests until 
his demise, at the ripe old age of eighty-five 
years. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Sarah Ormrod, was a native of England, and 
came to America with her mother, brothers, 
sisters, and step-father. She, too, lived to a 
good age, dying when seventy-five years old. 
She bore her husband thirteen children; 
namely, Sarah (deceased), Peter (deceased), 
Mary J., John, Josephine, George P., Horace, 



Charles (deceased), Victoria, Emma, Will- 
iam, Belle, and Clarence. 

George P. Ward received his elementary 
education in the district school. This he ad- 
vanced by attendance at the academies of New 
Marlboro and Suffield. He subsequently 
taught school for one term. Since that time 
he has been associated with his brothers in 
different branches of business, dealing ex- 
tensively in stock, tobacco, and lumber; and 
Fortune seemed to smile on whatever enter- 
prise he engaged in. From 1878 until 1893 
he manufactured paper, the firm being known 
as Ward Brothers, one of the most substantial 
in the county. They sold the plant in 1893. 
It had been in the family for a long period 
of years. 

Mr. Ward married Emogene Tifft, the nup- 
tials being celebrated August 26, 1870. 
They have an interesting family of children ; 
namely, Clayton, Jessie, Robert, and Horace. 
Mrs. Ward's father, J. W. Loren Tifft, was 
a native of Providence, R.I., and son of 
Stephen and Eliza (Ballou) Tifft, farmers and 
lifelong residents of Rhode Island. He was 
a scythe manufacturer, and followed his trade 
in different places. He was employed in 
Windham, Vt., where Mrs. Ward was born; 
but his last years were spent in Cornish, 
N.H. The maiden name of his wife was Lo- 
rania Pierce, a native of Londonderry, Vt., 
and a daughter of Joel and Amanda (Sweet) 
Pierce. Mr. Pierce was a blacksmith by 
trade, and did the smith work for the con- 
tractors on the Vermont Central Railway. 
Both he and his wife departed this life at 
Cavendish, Vt. Mr. Ward is a man of prom- 
inence and influence in the community. He 
is an earnest Republican, and has served his 
party as chairman of the Town Committee. 
For a number of years he has been a dele- 
gate to district, county, and State conven- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tions. In 1888 and 1890 he was elected to 
represent his town in the State legislature. 
Mrs. Ward is a consistent member of the Con- 
gregational church. 



/"©Yo 



EORGE V. CAPRON, a jewelry mer- 
VP'I chant of Falls Village and a veteran 
6f the Civil War, was born in Floyd, 
Oneida County, N.Y., December 27, 1834, 
son of Ledyard and Olive (James) Capron. 
Mr. Capron's grandfather, Elisha Capron, re- 
sided in Preston, New London County, Conn., 
and was a shoemaker by trade. Ledyard Ca- 
pron, Mr. Capron's father, was born in Preston, 
Conn., and followed shoemakingas an occupa- 
tion. He removed to Dutchess County, New 
York, where he resided for the remainder of his 
life, and died at the age of seventy-three. His 
wife, who died aged fifty-two years, became 
the mother of eight children; namely, Susan, 
John, Charles, Elisha, Giles, George V., 
James, and Ella. 

George V. Capron received his education in 
the public schools. He assisted his father 
until he reached the age of sixteen, at which 
time he commenced to learn the trade of a 
carpenter. After following that occupation 
for three years, he worked for a still longer 
period in a grist-mill. When the Civil War 
broke out, he enlisted as a private in Company 
G, Second Regiment, Heavy Artillery, Con- 
necticut Volunteers, and served with his regi- 
ment until discharged. Some time after his 
return from the army he settled in Falls 
Village, where he established himself in the 
jewelry business, and has since conducted a 
profitable trade. Mr. Capron has been promi- 
nently identified with public affairs in Falls 
Village for several years. He was for two 
years a member of the Board of Selectmen, 
represented his district in the legislature dur- 



ing the years 1880 and 1881, and is at the 
present time serving as Deputy Sheriff. He 
is a comrade of O. H. Knight. Post, No. 58, 
Grand Army of the Republic of Lakeville, 
and is a member of Montgomery Lodge, No. 
13, A. F. & A. M. In 1873 Mr. Capron was 
united in marriage to Mary J. Bump, daughter 
of Heman Bump, of Millerton, Conn., and has 
one son, named George W. Mrs. Capron; is 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 




RS. MARY ANN CULVER, one 
of the old and respected residents 

_ of Winsted, is the widow of Ed- 
ward Eaton Culver, a prominent builder and 
contractor of that town, who died in Winsted 
on New Year's Day, 1894. Mr. Culver was 
born in Colebrook, Conn., son of Philander 
and Prusa (Hewet) Culver. Philander Culver 
besides manufacturing hats worked in a tan- 
nery. He spent the declining years of his life 
on a farm in Litchfield, and died in Winsted 
at the home of his son when sixty-three years 
old. His wife lived to be ninety-one years of 
age, dying here in 1884. They reared eight 
children, two of whom are now widows, living 
in Winsted. 

Edward Eaton Culver, after completing his 
education at the common schools, entered the 
tannery at Colebrook, and there spent several 
years. He also spent some time in Litch- 
field, after which, in 1851, he came to Win- 
sted, and engaged in contracting, building, 
and lumbering. Mr. Culver erected many of 
the best buildings in the town, among which 
may be mentioned the opera house and the 
large school-house in the west part of Win- 
sted. After he retired from active business 
he was chosen by Mr. Gilbert to superintend 
the building of the Gilbert Home and the lay- 
ing out of the grounds. When his business 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



123 



was most prosperous, Mr. Culver employed a 
large number of men. "Associated with him 
in the lumber trade were his son and Hosea 
T. Streeter, who after his death carried on the 
business under the same name. He was nearly 
sixty-six when he died. In politics he was a 
Republican and in good standing in the party. 
He was Selectman for four years and Water 
Commissioner for thirteen years. He was 
also Director of the Winsted Savings Bank, 
and served on the Loan Committee; and he 
belonged to the Royal Arcanum and the 
American Mechanics. In religious belief 
he was Congregationalist, being a member of 
the Second Church from its beginning and one 
of the society committee. 

On November i, 1849, Mr. Culver married 
the lady whose name appears at the head of 
this article, the ceremony taking place at 
Litchfield. Mrs. Culver is a native of Sud- 
bury, Mass. Her maiden name was Bowker, 
being a daughter of Daniel and Ruth (Brown) 
Bowker. Her father was a farmer, who had 
an estate of one hundred acres, which is yet 
in the family, and is now occupied by the 
fifth generation. The farm, originally a 
•large one, has been reduced by division. Mr. 
Bowker died in 1853, when eighty-two years 
old. His wife had passed away some years 
before, laying down the cares of life at sixty- 
eight. They had fourteen children, and Mrs. 
Culver is the youngest of eleven who grew to 
adult age. She has but one living sister, 
Harriet, wife of Horace S. Gillett, of Indian- 
apolis, Ind. Mrs. Culver was educated at a 
boarding-school, and is a refined and culti- 
vated lady. Her married life has been shad- 
owed by aflfliction, for she has lost two chil- 
dren. Lucius F. died when two years old; 
and Elizabeth Ann, then the young wife of 
Charles T. Donaldson, died in 1873, cut off 
in her twenty-fourth year. Mrs. Culver's 



living children are: Florence E., who resides- 
with her mother; Edward M., a lumber mer- 
chant, who has succeeded to his father's busi- 
ness, and is senior partner in the firm of 
Culver & Bristol ; and Marion L. , a graduate 
of the West Winsted High School. The 
house on Wheeler Street in which Mrs. Cul- 
ver and family reside was built by her hus- 
band in 1872, and for over twenty years has 
held their household gods and sheltered them 
in joy and sorrow. 



OHN M. MILLER, who is successfully 
engaged in the manufacture of har- 
nesses, saddlery, and trunks in Lake- 
ville, was born in Wiirtemberg, Lentenbach, 
Germany, on September 21, 1835, son of 
Michael and Catherine (Schonleber) Miller. 
Michael Miller, who was also a native of 
Wiirtemberg, was a weaver by trade, and did 
the weaving for all the surrounding towns. 
He died at the age of fifty-four years, and his 
wife attained the same age. They were the par- 
ents of four sons and four daughters ; namely, 
Christiana, Jacob, Frederick, Catherine, Lou- 
ise, Christian, Fredricka, and John M. 

John M. Miller was educated in Germany, 
and served an apprenticeship to the shoe- 
maker's trade. In 1853, when eighteen years 
of age, he left his native land for America, 
landing at New York, and made his home in 
that city for the next three years. During 
that time he learned the harness-maker's 
trade. In the following year he met with an 
accident on the street car line, by which he 
lost his left limb. From New York he went 
to Newark, N.J., where he remained until 
1867. He then removed to Amenia, N.Y., 
and for seven years was employed at his trade. 
Then in 1875 he came to Lakeville, Conn., 
and started a harness shop, which he has con- 



124 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ducted since. He is also successfully engaged 
in the sale of saddlery and trunks. In 1861 
he was united in marriage with Miss Mary E. 
Mansfield, a daughter of James Mansfield, of 
Newark, N.J. They have an interesting fam- 
ily of five daughters living; namely, Addie 
L., Helen M., Emily, Alicia C, and Harriet 
L. The two eldest, Charles A. and Mary F., 
died in childhood. 



W' 



ALLACE CANFIELD, of the Can- 
field Brothers' Lime Company of 
East Canaan, was born in New 
Marlboro, Mass., December 4, 1858, son of 
Warren and Julia A. (Cook) Canfield. His 
father was a native of New Marlboro, and was 
. a son of Roderick Canfield, a former resident 
of that town. Warren Canfield followed the 
trade of a millwright throughout his life, 
and died in New Marlboro at the age of sixty- 
four years. His wife, Julia Cook, was a 
daughter of Lewis Cook, of New Marlboro. 
She was the mother of three children, namely: 
William J Nellie (deceased), who became the 
wife of Frank Coon; and Wallace, the subject 
of this sketch. Mrs. Warren Canfield died at 
the age of sixty-five years. 

Wallace Canfield passed his boyhood on the 
homestead in New Marlboro, and received his 
education in the schools of that town and in 
the Eastman Business College of Poughkeep- 
sie, N.Y. In 1891, in company with his 
brother, he engaged in the burning and ship- 
ping of lime in East Canaan, under the firm 
name of the Canfield Brothers' Lime Com- 
pany; and they now conduct a large and con- 
stantly increasing business, producing upward 
of thirty thousand barrels of lime annually, 
which product is shipped to Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, and to 
all parts of Connecticut. 



In 1880 Mr. Canfield was united in mar- 
riage to Anna M. Sandam, daughter of Will- 
iam H. Sandam, of New Marlboro, Mass.; 
and they have one child, Dewey. 




ARVEY WILCOX FINNEY, whose 
portrait appears on the opposite 
page, is well-known as one of the 
ablest financiers of Litchfield County and the 
wealthiest man in the town of Colebrook. He 
was born on December 16, 181 1, nearly four- 
score and four years ago; but time has dealt 
gently with him, stealing not the mental vigor 
that marked his younger days. Though he 
partially lost the use of his right arm after he 
was seventy years old, he has learned to write 
with his left hand, and is now noted for the 
excellence of his penmanship. From the 
genealogy of the family in the History of An- 
cient Windsor, Conn., we learn that Mr. 
Pinney is of the seventh generation in direct 
descent from Humphrey Pinney, who came to 
America in the "Mary and John" in 1630, 
and made his home at first in Dorchester, 
Mass., whence in 1635 he removed to Wind- 
sor, Conn., being one of the original settlers 
of that town. His great-grandson. Captain 
Abraham Pinney, born in 17 10, settled in 
Simsbury, Hartford County, Conn. 

Mr. Pinney's grandfather, Abram Pinney, 
son of Captain Pinney, was born December 
23. 173s ; and it is thought that he was a life- 
long resident of Simsbury, where he was en- 
gaged in tilling the soil for many years. His 
son, Asaph Pinney, born in Simsbury, Febru- 
ary 12, 1767, received an unusually fine edu- 
cation for those days, becoming a noted math- 
ematician and grammarian. He taught the 
higher branches of mathematics for many sea- 
sons. In 1797 he came with four of his 
brothers to the town of Colebrook, and bought 




HARVEY W. PINNEY. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



127 



a large tract of land near the southern boun- 
dary of the town. A few acres of the land had 
been cleared, and a small frame house and 
barn had been erected. Here he resided until 
his decease, at the age of sixty-eight years, 
being engaged in agricultural pursuits during 
the summer seasons and teaching school 
winters. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Betty Wilcox, was a native of Simsbury and 
a daughter of Roger and Elizabeth (Case) 
Wilcox. She was born September 9, 1777, 
and lived until 1847, the fruit of her marriage 
being four children : Eliza, Emma, Asaph 
O., and Harvey Wilcox, the direct subject of 
the present sketch. 

Harvey W. Pinney attended school in his 
boyhood, acquiring a practical education, and 
on the home farm became familiar with agri- 
cultural labors. He inherited musical talent 
from both of his parents and cultivated this to 
quite an extent, becoming so noted as a violin- 
ist that his services in furnishing music for 
dances were in great demand for thirty miles 
around. He also gained a wide reputation as 
a teacher of dancing. At the decease of his 
father Mr. Pinney and his brother engaged in 
farming on the paternal homestead, continu- 
ing in company for some time. In 1840 the 
former disposed of his interest in the estate, 
and in company with his brother-in-law, Ral- 
zemon Phelps, opened a hotel just across the 
line, in Winchester, on the Hartford and 
Albany turnpike. A year later Mr. Pinney 
purchased the property where he now resides 
and in the management of which he has met 
with eminent success, having by foresight and 
wise judgment in his operations accumulated 
a competency. He is widely known and re- 
spected as a very capable business man. Be- 
sides serving in the various local offices of 
trust and responsibility, in 1851 he was 
elected to the State legislature. In politics 



he is a stanch Democrat, and a worthy repre- 
sentative of the best element of his party. 

The wedding of Mr. Pinney and Harriet 
Abigail Wakefield took place on October 23, 
1850. Mrs. Pinney was born October 14, 
1822, in Colebrook, which was the native 
place of her father, Hezekiah Wakefield. 
Her paternal grandfather, Pattershall Wake- 
field, was a pioneer settler of the town, buy- 
ing a tract of timbered land, from which he 
had to clear a space to erect his humble log 
cabin. This he occupied for a while alone, 
his first wife having previously died. After 
his second marriage he built a good set 
of frame buildings, and there he lived the 
remainder of his years. His second wife, 
grandmother of Mrs. Pinney, was Sarah Bar- 
nard, of Simsbury, Conn., an active and ener- 
getic woman, who reared her children to 
habits of industry and economy. Hezekiah 
Wakefield succeeded his parents in the own- 
ership of the home farm, on which he spent 
his long life of eighty-two years. He married 
Harriet Barnard, of Simsbury, a daughter of 
Oliver and Elizabeth (Brown) Barnard. She 
lived to the age of seventy-nine years, and 
reared a family of ten children: Emily, 
Walter, Qrrin, Sarah, Charlotte, Francis, 
Harriet A. (Mrs. Pinney), Ward, Hiram, and 
Maria. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pinney have had two sons, 
but have been called to part with the elder, 
Victor Hugo, who died February 12, i8S4) at 
the age of two and a half years. The 
younger, named Lucien Vernett, was born 
May 9, 1853, and since his marriage with 
Augusta C. Burbank has been an esteemed 
resident of Winsted. Mr. Pinney is a well- 
read man, broad in his views, and possesses 
strong convictions, which he is fearless in 
expressing. In religion he is an avowed 
Spiritualist, firm and happy in his faith. 



128 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



^AMES F. KEENAN, a highly respected 
citizen and a successful furniture dealer 
and undertaker at 290 to 294 Main 
Street, West Winsted, Conn., was born in 
that town, April 20, 1854, son of James and 
Ann (Hughes) Keenan, both of whom were 
natives of Ireland, respectively born in the 
years 1820 and 18 19. 

Having saved sufficient money to pay his 
passage to this country, in 1851 James Kee- 
nan embarked, arriving in America after a 
twelve weeks' voyage. He settled in Win- 
sted, Conn., where he learned the tanner's 
trade of George Dudley, for whom he worked 
at this business thirty-eight years, acquiring 
considerable property by his industry and fru- 
gality. He was a man of inflexible integrity, 
remaining always steadfast to his convictions. 
He served as city Burgess many years, re- 
ceiving the vote of both parties, although he 
was a Republican. In 1853 his marriage 
with Miss Ann Hughes was performed in the 
Catholic church of CoUinsville, Conn. She 
had come to America in 1850, the year previ- 
ous to that of his arrival. The voyage was a 
rough and stormy one, and it was sixteen 
weeks before she landed at New York City. 
When in sight of port, the wind drove them 
to sea again. Cholera broke out on board 
the vessel; and of the nine hundred and 
thirty-six passengers who started with her but 
three hundred and eighty-six, or more than a 
third, lived to land at New York. She bore 
her husband two children, a son and daughter, 
James F. and Margaret. The latter is the 
wife of J. F. Coffee, of Winsted, Conn. The 
father died at his home at 34 Meadow Street, 
in which he had lived since 1861, and where 
his widow and son now reside. 

James F. Keenan received his education in 
the graded schools of Winsted, and at ten 
years of age began to work for his own liveli- 



hood at the meat business, in the employ of 
Parsons & Case. Later on he secured a posi- 
tion with the Strong Manufacturing Company, 
with which he remained thirteen years. Here 
he advanced step by step until, when he sev- 
ered his connection with that firm, he was 
head shipping clerk. In the two years fol- 
lowing he was successively employed as clerk 
in the Beardslee House of Winsted and the 
Gridley House of Bristol, Conn. He next 
engaged in railroading, as baggage master at 
West Winsted, from which position he as- 
cended to that of road master, and had 
charge of that line. On March i, 1893, he 
embarked in his present business enterprise, 
under the firm name of J. F. Keenan & Co., 
his sister being his partner. In their spa- 
cious rooms they carry a large and well- 
selected stock of furniture, and the business 
is thriving under Mr. Keenan's close atten- 
tion. 

On March 20, 1881, he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Mary Baker, of Winsted, 
daughter of Michael and Elizabeth (Lane) 
Baker, both of whom were natives of Ireland. 
They reared four sons and one daughter. The 
father died in 1878, past middle life, and the 
mother in 1884, over sixty years of age. Mr. 
and Mrs. Keenan's union has be.en brightened 
by the birth of three children, of whom May 
died at five years of age. The others are: 
Annie L., a girl of thirteen years; and Eliz- 
abeth, who is five years old. Mr. Keenan is 
a stanch Republican, and he and his family 
are consistent members of the Roman Cath- 
olic church. 



'OSIAH W. BROWN, a well-to-do farmer 
of Sharon, was born in Goshen, Conn., 
January 23, 1844, son of Warren and 
Esther (Tuttle) Brown. Mr. Brown's grand- 
father, William Brown, resided in Goshen 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



for the greater and latter part of his life. He 
married a Miss Hawley, and raised a family 
of eleven children, severally named: William, 
Reuben, Russell, Palmer, Warren, Lydia, 
Lavinia, Lavisa, Grace, Polly, and Lucy. 
Warren Brown, Mr. Brown's father, was bom 
in Groton, Conn. He settled upon a farm in 
Sharon, arid successfully cultivated it until 
his. death, which occurred when he was sixty- 
six years old. His wife, Esther Tattle, 
daughter of Tyranus Tuttle, of Goshen, became 
the mother of two children, namely: Sarah, 
deceased, who was the wife of Zalmon Mallory ; 
and Josiah W., the subject of this sketch. 
The mother died aged sixty-seven years. 

Josiah W. Brown was educated in the com- 
mon schools. He assisted in carrying on the 
home farm, and after the death of his father 
succeeded to the property. He has since fol- 
lowed general farming, and has long held a 
prominent position among the farmers of 
Sharon. Mr. Brown married Ellen Cart- 
wright, and has three children, as follows: 
Anna, who is now Mrs. Bierce, and has two 
children, named Stella and Ellen; Charles, 
who married Mary Loucks, daughter of John 
C. Loucks, of Sharon; and Maurice. Mr. 
Brown is a member of Hamilton Lodge, No. 
54, A. F. & A. M., Hematite Chapter, No. 
13, Royal Arch. Both he and his wife are 
members of Rose Chapter, No. 14, of the 

Eastern Star. 

«•*•-«.« ■ ■ 

-irx WIGHT ROGERS, a successful stock- 
I =H raiser and general farmer of North 
^JiS"^ Cornwall and a lifelong resident of 
the place that he now occupies, was born 
August 3,^1832, son of Daniel L. and Har- 
riet (Pratt) Rogers and a grandson of Noah 
and Lydia (Cornwall) Rogers. 

His great-grandfather, Noah Rogers, Sn, 
came to Cornwall about the year 1760. Noah 



Rogers, Jr., was a native of Cornwall, and 
spent his whole life there in the pursuit of 
agriculture. He was thrice married. His 
first union was with Miss Lydia Cornwall, 
who died when but thirty-six years of age, 
having borne five children; namely, Daniel 
L., Lydia, Rhoda, Noah, and Abbie. His 
second wife was before marriage Miss Eliza- 
beth Wilson. At her death she left a son 
and two daughters; namely, Eliza, Ambrose 
S., and Amanda. His third union was with 
Mrs. Abigail Whedon. Daniel L. Rogers 
was born on the old homestead in Cornwall 
in 1790. He was reared to farm life; and, 
after starting out in the world for himself, he 
purchased the place which his son now owns, 
an excellent farm, located about two and a 
half miles east of West Cornwall. He lived 
to be seventy-eight years of age. His wife, 
who was a daughter of Miner Pratt, of Corn- 
wall, was eighty-six years old at the time of 
her death. Five sons and four daughters 
were the fruit of their union. They were: 
Henry L., Daniel M., Egbert M., Mary E., 
Miner P., Harriet, Dwight, Abbie, and Har- 
riet, second. 

Dwight Rogers acquired his early education 
in the common schools of Cornwall, and later 
on attended the Williston Seminary. After 
teaching school for a few seasons he purchased 
the old home, and has since then confined his 
attention to agriculture. His specialty, how- 
ever, is dairying and stock-raising. He 
keeps a fine grade of both cattle and sheep. 
In 1863 he was joined in marriage with Miss 
Lucy L. Leete, a daughter of Deacon Edward 
Leete. She died August 18, 1893, in the 
fifty-fifth year of her age, leaving five chil- 
dren, namely: Dwight Leete, who married 
Miss Fanny Smith, daughter of John B. 
Smith, of New Britain, Conn., and has one 
son, Dwight Leete, Jr.; Nellie L. ; Harriet 



13° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



F. ; Miner P. ; and Sylvia A. Mr. Rogers 
takes especial interest in whatever will tend to 
improve the condition of the farmer and in- 
sure him the highest possible degree of happi- 
ness and prosperity. He is a charter member 
of the North Cornwall Grange. In religious 
views he favors Congregationalism, being a 
member of the Second Congregational Church 
of Cornwall, which he has served as Deacon 
since 1889. 

— — ■ — ■ <-*»^» 

(six LBERT P. BRIGGS, of East Canaan, 
>-A a veteran of the Civil War and man- 
' " V^ ager of a flour and feed mill for the 
Barnum, Richardson Company, was born in 
Canaan, August 17, 1842, son of Hiram and 
Jane E. (Peck) Briggs. Mr. Briggs's grand- 
father, Daniel Briggs, moved from Boston, 
Mass., to Canaan. He followed the trade of 
carpenter through life, and raised a family 
of eleven children. Hiram Briggs, father of 
Mr. Briggs, was born in Canaan, and adopted 
agriculture as an occupation. He was well- 
known throughout his section as a progressive 
and useful citizen, and was actively interested 
in public affairs, serving as a member of the 
Board of Selectmen and representing his dis- 
trict in the legislature in 1876. Hiram 
Briggs died in Canaan at the age of seventy- 
three years. His wife, daughter of Sheldon 
Peck, of Canaan, became the mother of six 
children: Albert P., Sarah, Charles H., 
Lois, Miles E., and Minnie E. 

Albert P. Briggs was educated in the 
schools of his native town, and was reared 
to agricultural work. He followed farming 
until he reached the age of eighteen, when he 
commenced to learn the carpenter's trade. 
After working as a carpenter for four years he 
enlisted for service in the Civil War as a pri- 
vate in the Nineteenth Regiment, Connecticut 
Volunteers. He was afterward transferred to 



the Second Regiment, Heavy Artillery. Upon 
receiving his discharge from the service, he 
returned home, and for eight years was em- 
ployed as a clerk in a store. He next en- 
gaged in farming for some years, after which 
he agreed, in 1879, with the Barnum, Rich- 
ardson Company to take charge of their flour 
and feed mill. The firm has a steady and 
profitable trade. It is not confined to the im- 
mediate neighborhood of the mills, but em- 
braces a liberal patronage from adjacent towns, 
and averages twenty-five thousand dollars an- 
nually. Since 1867 Mr. Briggs has been en- 
gaged as an auctioneer, and has transacted 
considerable business in that line. He is 
prominently identified with public affairs. 
In addition to other offices he has held that of 
Selectman, and represented his district in the 
legislature during the years 1886 and 1887. 
He is also a member of Post No. 61, Grand 
Army of the Republic, Department of Con- 
necticut. 

In 1868 Mr. Briggs was united in marriage 
to Ella J. Sewart, daughter of Reuben Sewart, 
of Canaan. They have one son, named Will- 
iam H., who married Katie Hayes. 



m 



ILLIAM M. CURTISS, M.D., of 
Cornwall Bridge, who, despite the 
fact that it is only about two years 
since he started in practice, has already at- 
tained a good measure of success in his chosen 
profession, was born at Norfolk, Conn., on 
November 12, 1870, son of Richard and Jo- 
hanna (Hannafin) Curtiss. Richard Curtiss 
is a prosperous agriculturist of Norfolk and a 
well-known citizen of that town. He and his 
wife are the parents of four children, all sons; 
namely, Richard, Jr., John, James, and Will- 
iam M. The father and mother are still' liv- 
ing, and each has attained the age of sixty years. 




JAMES H. BARNUM. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



133 



William M. Curtiss, M.D., spent his boy- 
hood days on the old farm. He attended the 
public schools of the town, and during his 
vacations assisted his father with the farm 
work. He subsequently studied for two years 
at Yale College. Later he attended the Bal- 
timore University School of Medicine, grad- 
uating from that institution in 1893. Shortly 
after receiving his diploma, he established 
himself at Cornwall Bridge, where he has ac- 
quired a good practice. His professional calls 
are made over a considerable territory, neces- 
sitating long drives, but indicating the rapid 
growth of his reputation. In June, 1895, he 
was joined in marriage with Miss Genevieve 
Bierce, a most estimable young woman, and 
one well fitted to help him in attaining suc- 
cess. She is a daughter of Edward Bierce, of 
Cornwall, Conn. Dr. Curtiss is a member of 
the Litthfield County Medical Society and 
also of the Connecticut State Medical Associ- 
ation. 

<^«» » 

rAMES H. BARNUM, a leading mer- 
chant of Lime Rock, Conn., was. born 
August 29, 1827, at 41 Bowery, New 
York City, son of Ira and Clarissa (Ely) 
Barnum. Ira Barnum, who was a saddler by 
trade, was an enterprising man, and conducted 
an extensive business in New York and in 
Augusta and Macon, Ga. He died in the 
prime of life, at the age of forty-five. 

James H. Barnum passed his early boy- 
hood in New York, finishing his education at 
Mechanic Institute. The quarter of the city 
where he was born was very different, it is 
scarcely needful to say, in the first half of 
this century from the Bowery of to-day. 
When a youth of fifteen, James H. Barnum 
visited Lime Rock ; and he was persuaded to 
remain there and work on his uncle's farm for 
about three years. He then entered the em- 




ploy of Barnum, Richardson Company, with 
whom he remained several years, acceptably 
filling the position of business manager for a 
long time and finally securing an interest 
in the company. This he later disposed of, 
purchasing in 1876 the store that he now owns, 
which is one of the largest in Lime Rock. 
He carries a stock of general merchandise and 

drugs. 

Besides attending to the pressing cares of 
business in connection with this large estab- 
lishment, Mr. Barnum has faithfully and con- 
tinuously served as Postmaster at Lime Rock 
since his appointment by President Grant. 
He is the oldest merchant on this line of rail- 
road between Bridgeport and Pittsfield. In 
1849 Mr. Barnum was united in marriage 
with Mary M. Loveridge, daughter of V. P. 
Loveridge, of Lime Rock. Two children 
blessed their union: a daughter, named Cla- 
rissa A., born June 2, 1854; and Julia L., 
born August 30, 1866, died June 10, 1883. 

Mr. Barnum votes the Democratic ticket. 
He was a member of the legislature in 1858, 
and has acted in different official capacities in 
the town, serving as Selectman fifteen years. 
He is a Mason, belonging to Montgomery 
Lodge, No. 13, A. F. & A. M. His resi- 
dence, which is a very handsome one, is in 
the east part of the village. Mr. Barnum's 
wife died December 11, 1891. She was a 
communicant of the Episcopal church. Mr. 
Barnum is well known throughout the county, 
and is a very popular man. His portrait, 
which is herewith presented, will be recog- 
nized with pleasure by many friends and 
acquaintances.. 



C'' 



lOBERT P. PENDLETON, a well- 
known farmer of South Canaan, was 
born in Norfolk, July 10, 1826, 
son of Ethan and Lucinda (Hungerford) Pen- 



134 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



dleton. Mr. Pendleton's grandfather, Simeon 
Pendleton resided in Westerly, R.I.; and his 
only son, Ethan Pendleton, Mr. Pendleton's 
father, was born in that town. Ethan Pendle- 
ton went to New York State, and was for 
many years a prosperous farmer. The latter 
part of his life was passed in Norfolk, Conn., 
where he died at the age of eighty-four. His 
first wife, whose maiden name was Ruth Tay- 
lor, left three children when she died. They 
were: Taylor, Frederick, and Russell. By 
his union with his second wife, who was be- 
fore marriage a Miss Hinckley, there were six 
children; namely, Sally, Abel, Hobart, 
Harry, Lucius, and Mary. His third wife 
was Lucinda Hungerford, of Colebrook, 
Conn. ; and she became the mother of two 
children : Robert P., the subject of this sketch ; 
and Olive. She died at the age of forty-five. 
He married for his fourth wife Clarissa Mil- 
ler, of Colebrook, who died, leaving no chil- 
dren, after which he wedded for his fifth wife 
Huldah Wright. 

Robert P. Pendleton resided with his father, 
and engaged in agriculture upon the home- 
stead in Norfolk. He inherited a farm of 
one hundred acres. He later moved to the 
farm in South Canaan where he now resides. 
This property, which also contained one hun- 
dred acres, "belonged to his wife. He con- 
ducts general farming with satisfactory re- 
sults, and is well and favorably known in the 
district. 

In 1880 Mr. Pendleton was united in mar- 
riage to Lois Merwin, daughter of Erastus 
M. Merwin, of Cornwall, and has three chil- 
dren; namely, Robert E., Merwin E., and 
Olin H. Mr. Pendleton has advanced in 
masonry to the Royal Arch degree, and is a 
member of Western Star Lodge, No. 61, and 
of Meridian Chapter of Salisbury. He was 
a charter member and first Master of the 



Canaan Agricultural Society. Both he and 
Mrs. Pendleton are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 



KREDERICK MURRAY, one of the 
veteran agriculturists of Litchfield 
County now enjoying the fruitage of 
their earlier years of toil and trials, was born 
in the town of Winchester, July 28, 1813. 
His father, Daniel Murray, was a native of 
the town of Torrington. His grandfather, 
Daniel Murray, Sr., who, it is supposed, was 
either born in Scotland or was of Scotch an- 
cestry, spent his last years on a farm in Tor- 
rington, where he married Lucretia, the sister 
of Jonathan Coe. 

Daniel Murray, Jr., learned the shoemaker's 
trade, and followed it for a while, but after 
his marriage settled on a farm in the town of 
Winchester. At the time of purchase a few 
cleared acres and a small log house consti- 
tuted the sole impro'^rients on his land; and 
in the log cabin the subject was born. After 
clearing more of the land he sold the place in 
1815, and bought another farm in the same 
town. From this he removed much of the 
timber, made a good homestead, and resided 
there until his death, at the venerable age of 
eighty-five years. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Roxalany North, a daughter of Juna 
North, of Torrington, outlived him several 
years, attaining the remarkable age of ninety- 
five years. They were among the most re- 
spected citizens of the town, and reared a 
family of seven children, who grew to matu 
rity, and became useful members of the 
community. 

Frederick Murray received a limited educa- 
tion in the pioneer schools of his childhood, 
and assisted his parents in clearing and cujti^ 
vating their land. To understand what farm- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



135 



ing was then it should be remembered that no 
railways spanned our country from the Atlan- 
tic to the Pacific Coast, neither were there 
any canals; while the farmers of this vicinity 
had to team their produce to Hartford. 

Mr. Murray remained beneath the parental 
roof-tree until his marriage with Ann Caul, 
the daughter of William and Elizabeth Caul, 
of Winchester, when he settled on the farm 
where he now resides. This is pleasantly lo- 
cated west of the lake, one and a half miles 
from the village of Winsted, and contains one 
hundred and sixty-five acres of choice and 
well-cultivated land. The family circle in- 
cludes seven children; namely, Catherine, 
Daniel, Ellen, Mary, Frederica B., Julia, 
and Anna. Mrs. Murray died January 6, 
1892. Daniel, the only son living, owns a 
fine farm about a half-mile from the home of 
his father, where he is carrying on general 
agriculture, paying especial attention to his 
horses, among which are some very fine ones. 
He married Rebecca Nash;" and they have 
one child, Emily. Mr. Murray is an estima- 
ble man, a stanch adherent of the Republican 
party ; and, though never -an aspirant for offi- 
cial honors, he takes an earnest interest in 
local affairs. 

tOLLIN DANIEL WILSON, proprie- 
tor of the Riverside Farm, was born 
_^ April 28, 1838, son of Daniel B. 
and Adeline (Doolittle) Wilson. Captain 
Abijah Wilson, his paternal grandfather, 
son of Noah and Ann Wilson, was born De- 
cember 18, 1746, in Torrington, and there 
spent his earlier years in tilling the soil. 
After his marriage he removed to the town of 
Winchester, where he purchased a large tract 
of wild land, including the homestead now 
owned and occupied by Rollin D. Wilson. 
He cleared a good farm, on which he and his 



wife, whose maiden name was Hannah Bush- 
nell, spent the remainder of their days. He 
was a man of remarkable intelligence, very 
prominent in public affairs, and was elected 
to the State legislature in 1798 and in 1802. 

Daniel B. Wilson was reared a farmer, and 
became identified with the agricultural inter- 
ests of this locality. He died March 31, 
1886, on the farm where he had spent his 
life, a period of more than fourscore years. 
He married Adeline Doolittle, a native of 
Winchester, and the daughter of Lyman and 
Achsa (Davis) Doolittle. She departed 
this life February 17, 1882, preceding her 
husband by a few years. She reared a fam- 
ily of nine children; namely, Elvira, John, 
Margaret, Jane, Rollin D., Emerette, Ade- 
laide, Henry, and Isabelle. 

Rollin D. Wilson began his pursuit of 
knowledge at the district school, and later at- 
tended a select school in Robertsville, taught 
by the Rev. Mr. Mace. On the home farm 
he obtained a practical experience in agricult- 
ure during the first twenty-one years of his 
existence; but then, following his mechani- 
cal inclinations, he commenced work in a 
clock factory. He earned fair wages while 
there, and in time was able to buy sixteen 
acres of land from his father. On this tract 
there was a small house, which had previously 
been used for schodl purposes, and in which 
he and his wife began house-keeping. He 
had worked in the clock factory seven years, 
when it was burned. Mr. Wilson then 
turned his attention to his early occupation, 
in which he has since continued, having 
been prospered from the first. He has added 
to his original acreage, having bought the 
larger part of the parental homestead, and 
has now a valuable farm of seventy-five 
acres, all in a high state of culture. In 1894 
he erected a commodious frame house, pleas- 



136 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



antly located on the west bank of the Still 
River; and here he and his wife exercise 
a generous hospitality, welcoming either 
friend or stranger within their gates. 

The marriage of Mr. Wilson with Augusta 
Evans, a native of this county, was performed 
in October, 1867. She bore him no children; 
but at her death she left an adopted daugh- 
ter, Adella. On August 30, 1887, Mr. Wil- 
son married the second time Miss Minnie 
Pierce, who was born in the town of Norfolk, 
Litchfield County. Her father, the late 
John Fierce, a native of Berkshire County, 
Massachusetts, who during his earlier years 
was employed in a carding-mill, and subse- 
quently followed the trade of a carpenter, 
spent his last years in Winsted, living some- 
what retired. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Harriet Cobb, was a native of Winsted, 
Conn., and a daughter of Allen and Pluma 
(Hinman) Cobb. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson 
have had two children namely: Harvey, 
born January 19, 1889, who died August 17, 
1890; and Howard, a bright and active little 
fellow, born May 15, 1892. The family at- 
tend and support the Second Congregational 
Church, of which Mrs. Wilson is a member. 
Politically, Mr. Wilson is a stanch supporter 
of the principles of the Democratic party. 




|UGENE L. PHELPS, a successful mer- 
chant and an extensive real estate 
owner of Litchfield, Conn., was 
born in this town October 22, 1853, son of 
John and Martha L. (French) Phelps. Mr. 
Phelps's great-grandfather, John Phelps, built 
the well-known United States Hotel in Litch- 
field, and conducted that hostelry as long as 
he lived. His son, Edward Phelps, who was 
born in Litchfield, December 17, 1772, settled 
upon a tract of land which is known as Echo 



Farm ; and he cleared and improved it into a 
state of cultivation. He was a prosperous 
farmer, passing the active portion of his life 
in that occupation. He died October 3, 1859. 
John Phelps, the second son of Edward, was 
born in Litchfield. He was educated in the 
common schools and at the high school, and 
for a time followed agricultural pursuits upon 
the old homestead. He afterward engaged 
in running a saw-mill, and still later adopted 
the carpenter's trade. His wife, Martha L. 
French, whom he married in 1842, was born 
in Charlestown, N. H., February 3, 1819, and 
was a daughter of Lee French, a native of that 
town. Her grandfather, Abel French, was a 
lifelong resident of Charlestown, where he fol- 
lowed the trade of a carpenter and joiner, and 
was a highly respected citizen. He died at 
the age of sixty-nine; but his wife, Lucy 
Wright, of Concord, N. H., daughter of a sea 
captain, lived to reach the advanced age of 
ninety years. Lee French was reared to farm 
life, and also worked at the carpenter's trade 
with his father. He resided in Charlestown 
for many years, but at length moved from 
there to Charlemont, N. H., where he died 
aged seventy-seven. His first wife, Lavinia 
Hotchkins, a native of Charlestown, became 
the mother of three children, two of whom are 
still living, namely: Martha L., Mr. Phelps's 
mother; and Abel. Mrs. Lavinia H. French 
died at the age of thirty-one. Martha L. 
French resided in Charlestown until reaching 
the age of sixteen, when she came to Connecti- 
cut and engaged in teaching school for some 
years before she was married to Mr. John 
Phelps. She has had three children, two of 
whom lived to reach maturity, namely: Eu- 
gene L., the subject of this sketch; and Lu- 
cretia, who married for her first husband John 
Stanton, and for her second Daniel Berry, of 
Waterbury. Mrs. Martha French Phelps re- 




EUGENE L. PHELPS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



139 



sides in Litchfield, and is still bright and 
active at the age of seventy-six. She was for- 
merly a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, but later became an Episcopalian. 

Eugene L. Phelps was educated in the dis- 
trict schools of his native town and lived with 
his parents until he was nineteen years old. 
In 1872 he established himself in a general 
mercantile business on West Street, and a 
short time later he moved his stock to a store 
in Judd's Block. By careful attention to busi- 
ness he secured the confidence and liberal 
patronage of the general public, and rapidly 
advanced in prosperity. On June 10, 1866, 
his store, including the stock, was totally 
destroyed by fire, thus causing him to sustain 
a severe loss ; but in company with others he 
built the Barracks, so called, where he con- 
tinued his business for two years. He then 
bought land and erected the Phelps Block, the 
ground floor of which is occupied by Wessel & 
Gates's pharmacy, Bigelow's market, the post- 
oflfice, and his own store, which is twenty by 
sixty feet. The upper floors are occupied by 
the Phelps Opera House, which seats six hun- 
dred people, the Grange Hall, and the lodge- 
room of the Knights of Columbus, the En- 
quirer office, and a barber shop. After relin- 
quishing general store-keeping Mr. Phelps 
conducted a large bakery, which was situated 
upon the main street of the town. He later 
sold that enterprise and engaged in his present 
business, which has developed into large pro- 
portions. He carries an extensive assortment 
of cigars, tobacco, and smoker's articles, and 
also handles teas and coffees. 

In 187s Mr. Phelps was united in marriage 
with Ella J. Austin. She was born in Har- 
winton. Conn., only daughter of Amariah and 
Mary (Hine) Austin, the former of whom was 
well known as the stage driver from Litchfield 
to East Litchfield. Mr. and Mrs. Phelps have 



two children. Lulu E. and George. Lulu E. 
Phelps was carefully educated in a private 
school, and has attained proficiency in the 
study of languages. The family attend the 
Congregational church and Sunday-school. 

Mr. Phelps is an able business man and a 
useful citizen. His success in life is due to 
his energy and industry, and these commend- 
able qualities have also been displayed for 
other purposes than his own business affairs. 
He has always exhibited a deep interest in the 
welfare of the community,- and is ever ready to 
aid in the furtherance of any movement which 
is calculated to be of benefit to the town. He 
is a Democrat in politics, and occupies a prom- 
inent position in local affairs. For several 
years he was a member of the Board of Bur- 
gesses, and is at the present time Warden of 
the borough. He has been Chief of the Fire 
Department since its organization, and has 
presided as chairman of the Democratic Town 
Committee for many years. He is well ad- 
vanced in the Masonic fraternity, being a 
member of St. Paul's Lodge of Litchfield, 
Darius Chapter, Buell Council, Clark Com- 
mandery of Waterbury, and of Pyramid Tem- 
ple of the Mystic Shrine of Bridgeport.- 

A portrait of Mr. Phelps occupies the page 
opposite the beginning of the foregoing sketch. 



/^TeORGE R. WILCOX, a blacksmith 
V i)l of Canaan, was born in that town, 
April II, 1844, son of Lucius and 
Belinda (Deming) Wilcox. Mr. Wilcox's 
grandfather, Reuben Wilcox, was a native of 
Cornwall. He was a cooper by trade, and 
followed that occupation through life. He 
died at the age of sixty-five years, having 
raised a family of eight children, severally 
named: Lucius, Whiting, Robert, Edwin, 
Henry, Lucia, Fanny, and Marrietta. Lu- 



140 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



cius Wilcox, father of Mr. Wilcox, was born 
in Cornwall. He learned the trade of a 
blacksmith, an occupation which he followed 
during the active period of life, and is now re- 
siding with his son in Falls Village. His 
wife, Belinda Deming before marriage, a 
daughter of Ruel Deming, of Canaan, became 
the mother of ten children; namely, Harriet, 
Mary, George R., Emma, Lucia, Jennie, 
Edwin, Elizabeth, Lee, and Ellen. The last 
three are dead. The mother died aged sixty- 
five years. 

George R. Wilcox attended the schools of 
Canaan, and when very young began to learn 
the blacksmith's trade. He afterward con- 
ducted a general blacksmith business in South 
Canaan. In 1885 he purchased his present 
farm, situated about two miles south of the 
village. He then built a new shop, where he 
is still following his trade with his usual 
activity. He also continues to superintend 
his farm. In 1865 he was united in mar- 
riage to Mary F. Curry, daughter of George 
Curry, of Falls Village, and has one son, 
named Eliot A. Mr. Wilcox in politics is 
an active Republican. He is a member of 
the Board of Selectmen and a Free and 
Accepted Mason of Hoosatonic Lodge. He 
and Mrs. Wilcox attend the Congregational 
church. 



T^HAUNCEY S. FOSTER, a pros- 
it jj"'^ perous merchant tailor and clothier 

V»i2 of Winsted, was born in Jefferson, 

Schoharie County, N.Y., September 12, 
1827. His father was Smith Foster, of New 
Marlboro, Mass. ; and his grandfather was 
Ezekiel Foster, an oldtime schoolmaster, 
who devoted part of his life to agricultural 
pursuits. Ezekiel, having passed the age of 
threescore and ten, died, and was interred in 
the cemetery at Norfolk, Conn. His wife, 



Sarah (Smith) Foster, was the daughter of 
Captain Smith, a soldier of the Revolution, 
who fought in the battle of Bennington, and 
served till the end of the war. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ezekiel Foster reared two sons and four 
daughters. 

Smith Foster was a spinner in the woollen- 
mills of Norfolk, and was also a capable 
farmer. He removed to Jefferson, Schoharie 
County, N.Y., and there for some years cul- 
tivated a farm, returning to Connecticut in 
his old age. He was a fine scholar for his 
time and an especially good penman, looking 
after his son's book-keeping as a pastime and 
taking great pleasure in the neat appearance 
of the books. He was a man of fine carriage 
and commanding appearance, well-preserved 
and active up to the time of his death, which 
occurred when he 'was eighty-two years old. 
His wife, to whom he was married in 1826, 
was the daughter of Eliphalet Clark, of 
Haddam, Conn., and the grand-daughter of 
Ezekiel Clark, a musician in the Revolution- 
ary army. Her father, who was a wealthy 
land-owner in Haddam, moved to Norfolk. 
The farm on which the Hillshurst House now 
stands was part of the property he acquired 
then. Mrs. Clark, a member of the Thomas 
family, was of Welsh descent. Mrs. Foster 
was a beautiful woman. Her mother used 
to fondly say of her, " She was as handsome 
a gal as there was in old Haddam." She 
died when about seventy-one years old, leav- 
ing two daughters and one son, the latter the 
subject of this sketch. Emily Foster became 
the wife of Horace B. Stevens, of Canaan, 
Conn.; and Miss Sarah Foster lives at the 
old home in East Canaan. 

Chauncey S. Foster acquired a fair com- 
mand of the three R's (reading, 'riting, and 
'rithmetic) in the district schools, which he 
attended until fifteen years of age. His father 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



141 



allowed him the choice of a finished educa- 
tion or a trade; and he chose the latter, be- 
ginning his apprenticeship in Norfolk and 
finishing in New York City when he was 
twenty-one years of age. He has been a suc- 
cessful man. The burden of his sixty-odd 
years sits lightly upon his shoulders, .his sum- 
mer vacations in the Adirondacks being still 
enjoyed with all the zest and activity of 
youth. 

Mr. Foster was married at the age of 
twenty-four to Helen E., daughter of Eb^n- 
ezer and Fanny (Yale) Beebe, of South 
Canaan, and has two children living. Geoxge 
C. is a cutter in his father's tailoring estab- 
lisment; and Fannie Belle is a promising 
young musician, who was educated at Wind- 
sor, Conn. A son, Junius, died when a little 
over two years old. 

Mr. Foster is Secretary and Director of the 
Winsted Edge Tool Company. He votes the 
Republican ticket, and is active in Lodge 
matters, having been a Mason for forty years, 
and holding the position of Past High Priest 
of the Chapter of same, having filled in suc- 
cession all the chairs. In the Methodist 
church Mr. Foster is a respected member. • 



EEWIS CATLIN, a prominent farmer of 
; Harwinton, was born in that town 
..^ July 6, 1824, son of Lewis and 
Annie (Catlin) Catlin, both natives of Har- 
winton. The Catlin family has been identi- 
fied with the agricultural interests of Har- 
winton for many generations,- Mr. Catlin's 
grandfather, also Lewis Catlin, who was born 
in Harwinton, June 3, 1758, being a farmer in 
that town. Extracts obtained by the family 
from the records of the War Department show 
that Grandfather Catlin enlisted in the Revo- 
lutionary army in the summer of 1776, and 



subsequently re-enlisted twice, and that he 
participated in the battle of Stillwater and 
assisted in carrying General Benedict Arnold 
from the field when he was wounded. Return- 
ing to his native town after the close of the 
war, he resumed his agricultural occupations, 
acted for years as a Justice of the Peace, and 
died January 7, 1839. On June 26, 1785^ he 
was married to Candace Catlin, who survived 
him some years, and was in receipt of a pen- 
sion from the government on account of her 
husband's services in the Revolutionary War. 
One of their sons, George. S. Catlin, who was 
born in Harwinton in 1808, was a graduate of 
Amherst, and for years was a prominent law- 
yer in Willimantic, Conn. In 1848 he was 
elected to the United States Congress from the 
Third Congressional District, and in the same 
year was the Democratic candidate for gov- 
ernor of Connecticut. He was well-informed 
on all the topics of the day and was an eloquent 
speaker. His sister, Candace, married Gen- 
eral Morris Woodruff, father of Judge George 
C. Woodruff, and grandfather of the present 
Judge George M. Woodruff, of Litchfield. 
Lewis Catlin, father of the subject of this 
sketch, devoted his life to agriculture, spend- 
ing his earlier years on the old homestead and 
the latter part of his life in the village. He 
also entered the political field, represented the 
town in the legislature, and was for many 
years a Justice of the Peace. He died at the 
age of sixty-six. His wife, who, though bear- 
ing the same surname, was no relation, was a 
daughter of Benjamin Catlin, also a farmer of 
Harwinton. She died at the age of seventy- 
one, having borne seven children. Of these, 
three are still living, namely : Anna, widow of 
the late, Addison Webster, of Harwinton; 
Lewis, the subject of this sketch; and Lucy 
A., wife of Henry Reynolds, a carpenter and 
joiner of Harwinton. 



J42 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Lewis Catlin went to work at the age of 
fourteen, entering a store in Harwinton, where 
he was employed as clerk for two years. He 
then spent five years down South in Georgia 
engaged in mercantile pursuits, at the expira- 
tion of which time he returned to Harwinton 
and opened a general store. This venture 
proved a success, and eight years later he 
undertook the management of a farm, conduct- 
ing the store and the farm conjointly for about 
twenty years. He eventually disposed of his 
mercantile interests, and turned his attention 
wholly to farming. Mr. Catlin is a man 
whose ability and good judgment command 
success. That he has the confidence of his 
fellow-townsmen is shown by the frequent 
calls he receives from them to act as appraiser 
of property and administrator in settling 
estates. He was married in 1848 to Joan R., 
daughter of Truman Kellogg, a prominent and 
wealthy citizen of Harwinton. Truman Kel- 
logg, who acquired a fortune in Georgia in liis 
youth, used to hold an open purse for Harwin- 
ton when financial aid was needed for its 
improvements. He died in 1854, at the age 
of sixty-four. He had two daughters, now 
deceased, namely: Jane, who married Luther 
Hoadley; and Joan R., who died at the age of 
fifty-two. Two children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Catlin, Edward K. and Jane H. The 
latter married Frank S. Grossman, a boot and 
shoe dealer of Brooklyn, N.Y., and has two 
children: Louis C, travelling salesman for a 
jewelry firm of South Attleboro, twenty-one 
years of age; and Ella K., eighteen years old. 
In politics Mr. Catlin has ceased to be a 
party man, in order to support the best candi- 
dates. He was at first a Democrat, then a 
Republican; and now he is independent. He 
represented his district in the lower house of 
the State legislature in 1852, 1862, and 1865, 
was elected from the Fifteenth Senatorial Dis- 



trict in 1 871, and has served as Postmaster 
and Town Clerk of Harwinton twenty-five 
years. He is a man of unusual intelligence, 
and holds a leading place in the community, 
not alone on account of the prominence of his 
family, but also because of his own sterling 
character. He is actively connected with the 
Congregational church, as were also his wife 
and children. 




TD I GRACE NORTH, a representative 
agriculturist of this section of Litch- 
field County and a well-known resi- 
dent of the town of Colebrook, was born 
October 10, 1833, on the farm where he now 
resides. His father, Martin North, was like- 
wise a native of Colebrook, born November 5, 
1804, son of Rufus North, who was born, it is 
supposed, in Torrington, December 24, 1769. 

The North family originated in England, 
the branch in America being directly traced 
back to the emigrant ancestor, John North, 
who was born in England in 1615, and who 
twenty years later came to this country, mak- 
ing the voyage in the good ship "Susan and 
Ellen." He was one of the first settlers of 
Farmington, Conn., where he married and 
spent the rest of his days. His son Thomas, 
born in 1649, married Hannah Newell, a 
daughter of Thomas Newell, and was a life- 
long resident of Farmington. Their son 
Ebenezer, born in 1703, married Sibyl Curtis, 
and with his wife removed to Torrington, of 
which they were among the first settlers, and 
where their son Martin was born December 
14, 1735- Martin was twice married, his first 
wife, the great-grandmother of the subject of 
this sketch, having been Abigail Eno. Their 
son Rufus, the grandfather of Horace North, 
removed from Torrington to Colebrook, and 
purchased the North homestead, on which his 
grandson, Horace, resides. He was an ener- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



143 



getic, persevering man, and a typical pioneer. 
He labored hard during his life to clear a 
homestead from the wilderness, and died June 
20, 1 84 1. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Esther Robards, was born June 15, 1768, and 
lived until March 5, 1856. 

Martin North, father of Horace North, when 
old enough assisted in clearing the land and 
tilling the soil. He was by nature a 
mechanic ; and, although he never learned a 
trade, he used tools of all kinds with a facility 
that saved him much expense, and enabled him 
to have many labor-saving devices that he 
should otherwise have dispensed with. He 
succeeded to the ownership of the parental 
homestead. He married Mercy North, a native 
of Colebrook, born December 28, 1808, being a 
daughter of Enos and Celina (Pinney) North, 
and they reared two sons : Henry, a resident 
of Guthrie County, Iowa; and Horace, the 
subject of this sketch. The mother died in 
July, 1894, at the home of her son Henry. 
Ehos North was born in Torrington, Novem- 
ber 17, 1773, and, after his marriage with Miss 
Pinney, settled on a farm about a mile south 
of Colebrook Centre, where he afterward lived. 
He was a son of Ebenezer and Jerusha 
(Cowles) North, pioneer settlers of Colebrook, 
who located on a tract of unimproved land 
about a quarter of a mile south of the central 
part of the town, and a descendant, in the 
fourth generation, of John North, the emigrant 
ancestor of the North family. 

Horace North .has been constantly engaged 
in agriculture, thereby acquiring an experi- 
ence that has placed him among the leading 
farmers of his native town. Succeeding his 
father in the ownership of the ancestral acres, 
he has carried on general farming with success. 
He has also an extensive dairy business, keep- 
ing a herd of fine grade Jerseys. On October 
23, 1855, Mr. North was united in matrimony 



with Frances Cooper, who was born in Win- 
sted, May 12, 1837. Her father, Samuel 
Alfred Cooper, who was a native of this State; 
went to California in search of gold in 1849, 
and never returned. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Julia Bills, was a native of Harwin- 
ton. Conn., born February 27, 18 18, daughter 
of Seth Bills, a prosperous farmer. She is 
now living at Winsted, and is the mother of 
five children, namely: Frances (Mrs. North); 
William S. ; Samuel A. ; Charles W. ; and 
Minerva, who died in childhood. The three 
children born of the union of Mr. and Mrs. 
North were: Frederick J., Martin, and Helen. 
Frederick J. and Martin died in childhood; 
while Helen was married in 1883 to Frederick 
Chester, of Bloomfield. He died September 
5, 1892, and Mrs. Chester now lives with her 
parents. Both Mr. and Mrs. North are mem- 
bers of the Colebrook Grange, No. 82, as is 
also their daughter, Mrs. Chester. 



/STeORGE L. FOSKETT, an enterpris- 
V i) I ing and prosperous farmer of Win- 
sted, was born in West Stockbridge, 
Berkshire County, Mass., September 24, 1845, 
son of George G. and Hannah E. (Brownell) 
Foskett. His father, who was also a native of 
West Stockbridge, born in 1822, was a son of 
Nathaniel Foskett, of New Marlboro, Mass., 
who was born February 14, 1796. The latter 
died in December, 1868, at the home of his 
daughter Lydia, wife of Gideon Hall, Judge 
of the Superior Court at Winsted. Nathaniel 
Foskett married Clarissa Ward, of old Berk- 
shire County, Massachusetts; and they had 
two children, the son and daughter already 
mentioned. Mrs. Nathaniel Foskett died in 
Winsted in 1865, at the age of sixty-four years. 
George G. Foskett learned the trade of 
wagon and carriage maker, in which he became 



144 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



an adept. He conducted a successful business 
on his own account for many years, besides 
engaging to some extent in agriculture. At 
his death he left a good property, including 
the Spring Hill farm, now in possession of his 
son, George L. Foskett. This land, which 
adjoins the borough of Winsted, is now being 
taken up for residence property, a part of it 
being occupied by the Winsted Hotel. The 
cemetery of eighteen acres was a part of the 
farm. The marriage of George G. Foskett to 
Hannah K. Brownell took place in 1844, and 
they became the parents of four children, 
namely: George L. , whose name appears 
above; Charles F., who went to Olney, Hi., 
in 1868, where he is engaged in the drug busi- 
ness; Mary L. , who resides at the old family 
home in Winsted; and Gideon Hall, who died 
in 1867, at the early age of five years. The 
father died October 9, 1894, the mother hav- 
ing previously passed away in January, 1884, 
at the age of sixty-one. Both parents were 
members of the Congregational church. 

George L. Foskett was trained to the wagon 
and carriage making trade by his father. He 
had obtained an education in public and pri- 
vate schools and at the Fort Edward Collegiate 
Institute in Washington County, New York, 
from which he was graduated in 1865. His 
first business experience, however, was as a 
clerk for B. F. Marsh, who kept a general 
store in Winsted. He remained with him for 
three years, and then took the position of 
agent for David Howard & Co., in which firm 
he was a silent partner. Three years later the 
firm wound up their business and Mr. Foskett 
moved to his present home, then the property 
of his father, becoming identified with the 
latter in his business and succeeding him 
therein. The farm on which he lives is noted 
for its fine spring water, and was the source 
from which the east part of Winsted for some 



time derived its supply. Mr. Foskett was 
associated with his father in the breeding of 
Jersey cattle, in which he still continues. He 
also breeds the Shropshire grades of sheep. 
He has been a member of the Board of Agri- 
culture for the past two years, and is Secretary 
of the State Cattle Commission. He is also 
interested in building enterprises, being a 
stockholder in the Winsted House Company, 
and general agent for same. He is besides 
prominent in various social orders. He is a 
member of the Royal Arcanum, in which he 
has been Chaplain five years, District Deputy 
of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, 
and member of the Grand Lodge, member of 
the Grange, and Master of the Mountain 
County Pomona Grange. He is also one of 
the Directors of the Winsted Park. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican, and is a man who 
takes a keen interest in the welfare of his 
town and locality. 

Mr. Foskett was married on November 24 
(Thanksgiving Day), 1870, to Miss Mary E. 
Bird, of Winsted, daughter of James Bird, of 
Bethlehem, Conn. Mr. and Mrs. Foskett 
have lost one infant son. The living children 
are as follows: George Herman, born July 30, 
1873, who was educated in Winsted and at the 
Robins School at Norfolk, and who., after 
some time with an uncle in Chicago, returned 
home on account of poor health and is now 
engaged on the farm; Charles Lewis, born 
September 25, 1876, now in the Storrs Agri- 
cultural College of Connecticut; and Eliza- 
beth, born June 21, 1882, a bright and promis- 
ing girl of thirteen years. 



TJJHARLES M. CHASE, a successful 
I J[ merchant and a highly respected and 

V» — ^ influential citizen of Winsted, 
Conn,, was born in Millbury, Mass., January 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1 45 



29, 1863, son of David B. and Sarah (Newton) 
Chase. His grandfather, Paul C. Chase, was 
also a native of Millbury, where he was born 
about 1803. Like the majority of his contem- 
poraries in his town, Grandfather Chase was 
reared to the business of farming, and when he 
started out in life for himself he adopted it 
for his regular occupation. He married Miss 
Mary Blood, and their union was blessed by 
the birth of two sons and four daughters. All 
the children lived to marry and rear families. 
Two now survive, namely : George L. Chase, 
who is President of the Hartford Fire Insur- 
ance Company at Hartford, Conn. ; and David 
B. Their father died in Millbury, Mass., in 
1883 ; and their mother passed away about five 
years later. Both rest in the Millbury 
cemetery. 

David B. Chase learned the trade of a 
machinist, at which he worked for a time ; but 
during the past sixteen years he has been suc- 
cessfully conducting business as a hardware 
merchant in Winsted, having a store at 309 
Main Street. He was married in 1850 to 
Sarah Newton Chase, a daughter of William 
Newton, of Wilkinsonville, Mass., engaged in 
business as a millwright. Four children were 
born to them, namely: George F. Chase, a 
builder of Millbury; a daughter who died in 
infancy ; and Charles M. and Agnes J. Chase, 
who reside at home. Agnes J., assisted by 
her brother Charles, is successfully engaged in 
the florist's business. She has established a 
thriving trade, and makes a fine floral display 
in their garden and greenhouse. Their mother 
died in 1868, over forty years of age. After 
a time their father remarried, his bride being 
Miss Augusta Newton, a sister of his former 
wife. They reside at their pleasant home at 
5 Prospect Street. 

Charles M. Chase, who has always lived at 
home, attended the common school until he 



was seventeen years of age. He then spent 
six years learning the tinsmith's trade in his 
father's shop, after which he continued to 
work for his father up to the spring of 1895, 
when he succeeded to the business. He is a 
thorough business man, and was practically 
manager for the past eleven years. He carries 
an excellent assortment of stoves, and tin and 
sheet iron ware. Mr. Chase has thus far chosen 
the life of single blessedness. In political mat- 
ters he is a Republican. He has been Warden 
of Winsted since May, 1894. He is a charter 
member of Waramaug Tribe of Red Men, and 
an enthusiastic, active, and efficient worker in 
that noble band. He is also a member and 
Past Grand Master of Clifton Lodge, No. 30, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



OHN C. RICHMOND, a well-known 
public official and prosperous farmer of 
North Canaan, was born in that town 
March 29, 1839, son of John H. and Betsey 
A. (Curtis) Richmond. Mr. Richmond's 
grandfather was Dr. John Richmond, a prac- 
tising physician of Haddam, Conn. John H- 
Richmond was born in Haddam, and came to 
Canaan at the age of fifteen. He moved from 
Canaan to Salisbury, Conn., in which latter 
place he resided eight years, and at the expira- 
tion of that time returned to North Canaan. 
He purchased the farm on which his son, John 
C, resides, and engaged in agriculture with 
prosperous results until his death, which took 
place when he was sixty-three years old. His 
wife, Betsey A. Curtis, was a daughter of 
James Curtis, of Sheffield, Conn. She be- 
came the mother of two children, John C. 
and Charles H. Her death occurred when she 
was in her fifty-fifth year. 

John C. Richmond was trained to an agri- 
cultural life, and remained for some years on 



146 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the home farm. He was later for several years 
engaged in teaming for the Barnum & Rich- 
ardson Company, but finally resumed farming. 
After his father's death he came into posses- 
sion of the homestead, on which he has since 
resided. The farm, which is situated about a 
mile from the village, originally consisted of 
one hundred acres, to which Mr. Richmond 
has added twenty acres, and now has a well- 
improved farm, which he cultivates with satis- 
factory results. Mr. Richmond is a veteran 
in the public service, having held the office of 
Deputy Sheriff for twenty-three years and that 
of Tax Collector for twenty years. He has also 
acted as Constable, Grand Juror, and Justice 
of the Peace. In 1876 he was united in mar- 
riage to Elizabeth Roraback, daughter of John 
C. Roraback, of Sheffield, Conn. 



W'^ 



[LLIAM HENRY VINING, whose 
features are portrayed on the adjoin- 
ing page, and something of whose 
family history is given below, is an intelligent 
and prosperous agriculturist of Colebrook, 
Conn., and one of the most valued and es- 
teemed citizens of the town. He was born 
March 10, 1840, in the town of Birmingham, 
New Haven County, Conn., and comes of 
excellent English ancestry. His father, Will- 
iam Vining, was a son of Thomas Vining, 
both being natives of Simsbury, Conn. The 
latter, who married Mary Wesley, was a car- 
penter; and in addition to following his trade 
he also carried on general farming, his home- 
stead being in Simsbury. 

William Vining learned the carpenter's 
trade when a young man, but after his removal 
to Birmingham engaged in the manufacture of 
wire, then one of the principal industries of 
that place, and also carried on farming to 



some extent. A few years later he returned 
to the place of his nativity, and, buying a 
farm, there engaged in agricultural pursuits 
until his death, at the age of sixty-nine years. 
His wife, Orpha Hart Vining, bore him eight 
children, as follows: Albert; Wealthy; Rob- 
ert; Mariette; William H., of whom we 
write; Julius; Elizabeth; and Alice. Mrs. 
Orpha H. Vining was a daughter of Titus 
Hart, of Colebrook, and spent her last years 
on the Simsbury homestead. Her father was 
twice married. His first wife, Lucy Johnson, 
who was born September 22, 1803, died at 
the age of thirty-eight years, leaving eight 
children. His second wife was Betsey An- 
drews, a daughter of Elijah Andrews; and of 
their union nine children were born, making 
seventeen of the two marriages, all but one of 
whom grew to adult life. 

Mr. Hart was born in Wallingford, Conn., 
and was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. 
After the declaration of peace he came to 
Colebrook, where he bought a tract of wild 
land, upon which he built a good set of build- 
ings and cleared a homestead for himself and 
family, living here until his death, July 27, 
1844, four days to the decease of his second 
wife. 

William H. Vining was reared and edu- 
cated in Simsbury, residing there until twenty- 
one years old, when he went to New York 
City, where he was engaged in the livery busi- 
ness for three or four years. Going from there 
to Springfield, Mass., he was employed for 
some time in the United States Armory, 
coming from there to Colebrook, where he has 
been engaged in general farming on the Hart 
homestead. Mr. Vining was united in mar- 
riage November 26, 1867, with Jane S. Hart, 
who was born on the farm where she now 
resides, August 15, 1847. Her father, Tim- 
othy Hart, was born on the same farm, and was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



149 



a son of Titus and Betsey (Andrews) Hart, 
mentioned above. 

Timothy Hart was for many years' identified 
witii the agricultural interests of this town, 
having always resided on the paternal home- 
stead, at the death of his parents buying the 
interest of the other heirs. He lived to cele- 
brate the eightieth anniversary of his birth. 
He was quite prominent in local affairs, being 
an influential member of the Democratic party, 
and serving one or more terms in the State 
legislature. The maiden name of his wife was 
Margaret Wakefield. She was born August 9, 
1806, on the adjoining farm, the birthplace of 
her father, Adin Wakefield, who came into the 
world on November 25, 1773. His father, 
Patershall Wakefield, the great-grandfather of 
Mrs. Vining, was formerly from Ashford, 
Conn., but removed from there to Windsor, 
where he married Margaret Phelps. From 
Windsor he came to Colebrook and bought a 
tract of land near the centre of the town, being 
one of the original settlers of the place. A 
few years later his wife was taken sick and 
returned to her relatives in Windsor, where 
she died. He subsequently married Sarah 
Barnard. 

Adin Wakefield was reared to mature years 
by his maternal grandparents in Windsor. 
After his marriage he bought a tract of unim- 
proved land in the south part of Colebrook, on 
which he erected good buildings. He there 
carried on farming until his death, June 16, 
1857, at the age of fourscore and three years. 
The maiden name of his wife, grandmother of 
Mrs. Vining, was Susannah Barney. She was 
born June 11, 1774, and died November 23, 
1856, leaving six children. Of the union of 
Timothy Hart and Margaret Wakefield but one 
child was born, Mrs. Vining. Mrs. Hart died 
September 14, 1875, some years before her 
• husband. 



The pleasant household circle of Mr. and 
Mrs. Vining has included six children ; 
namely, Adin W., Roscoe W. , Leon H., Lil- 
lian J., Florence M., and Henry H. Roscoe 
W. Vining is now attending the Folts Mission 
Institute at Herkimer, N.Y., as a member of 
the class of 1896. Leon H., the third child, 
died on October 3, 1878, at the age of two 
years. Since reaching his majority Mr. Vin- 
ing has been a prominent and useful member 
of the Democratic party, serving with faithful 
zeal in the various town offices, having been a 
member of the Board of Health, of the School 
Board, Assessor, Collector, and thirteen years 
a member of the Board of Selectmen. In 
1879 he was elected to the State legislature, 
where he voted for William Eaton for United 
States Senator. Socially, Mr. Vining is a 
member of the Colebrook Grange, No. 82. 

Mr. Vining has in his possession the first 
deed for the land he 1 ives on, dated November, 
1780, to Titus Hart, by Samuel Mattoon. At 
that time this town was a part of Waterbury. 



W- 



ILLIAM BISSELL, M.D., one of 
the leading physicians of Lakeville, 
was born in Litchfield, Conn., 
March 15, 1830, son of Amos and Lydia B. 
(Hall) Bissell. Amos Bissell, who was also 
a native of Litchfield, owned a large farm 
about two and a half miles west of Litchfield 
village, and spent many years of his life in the 
successful pursuit of agriculture. He lived to 
be eighty-seven years old. His wife died at 
sixty-four years of age. They were the par- 
ents of four sons and three daughters ; namely, 
Edward, William, Elizabeth, Julia, Mary, 
Dwight, and Lyman. The last-named died in 
infancy. 

William Bissell received his early education 
in Litchfield under the instruction of the Rev. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



C. G. Eastman. Later on he attended Yale 
College, graduating in the class of 1853. He 
then took up the study of medicine at the New 
Haven Medical College, and graduated from 
there in 1856. That same year he began the 
practice of his profession in Elizabeth, Union 
County, N.J. After si.x months he came to 
Lakeville, where he now has quite an exten- 
sive practice. He has also frequent calls from 
the surrounding towns. 

In 1858 he was joined in marriage with 
Miss Mary G. Biddleman, of Bloomsbury, 
N.J. She is now sixty years old. They have 
three sons and a daughter, as follows : Joseph 
B. , who is now a practising physician in New 
York City; William B. , a successful physi- 
cian of Lakeville; Edward C, who is studying 
law; and May B. Dr. Bissell is an honored 
member of the State and County Medical Soci- 
eties, and is held in high estimation by the 
community in which he lives. His office is 
in his residence on the principal street of 
Lakeville. 




|RS. HARRIET D. (WADS- 
WORTH) KILBOURNE, widow 
of the late Dr. Charles J. Kil- 
bourne, is a cultured and refined woman, whom 
it is a pleasure to meet in .social circles. She 
was born in Litchfield, a daughter of James C. 
Wadsworth, who was one of Farmington's 
favored sons. Her grandfather, Luke Wads- 
worth, a lifelong resident of Farmington, was 
well known and respected in Hartford County. 
He married Abigail Cowles, who, likewise, 
spent her entire life in that town ; and they 
reared a family of eight children, of whom 
James C. was their second child. 

James C. Wadsworth was reared and edu- 
cated in the town of his birth, and began to 
earn a living when quite young. He was first 



employed as a clerk at a store in Lansingburg, 
where he afterward established himself in busi- 
ness on his own account. He subsequently 
removed to Litchfield, here opening a store 
with his brother Amos, and continuing in 
business with him for a number of years. Re- 
moving then to Danbury, Mr. Wadsworth be- 
came a leading merchant of the place. He 
had been there about seven years when a disas- 
trous conflagration consumed his store and 
stock. Deeming himself too far advanced in 
years to then start another establishment, he 
returned to this town, and thereafter lived 
retired from active business until his demise, 
at the venerable age of ninety-two years. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Sally Cooke, 
was a daughter of Thomas Cooke, and a grand- 
daughter of Colonel Joseph P. Cooke, an 
officer in the State militia and in the Revolu- 
tionary army. Colonel Cooke was an inti- 
mate friend of General Washington, who 
visited him at his home by invitation on two 
different occasions. A graduate of Yale, he 
was a man of many accomplishments, was a 
member of the First Congress, and was other- 
wise prominent in public life for twoscore 
years. Thomas Cooke was twice married. 
Mrs. Wadsworth had two own brothers, James 
H. and William Cooke, both prominent mer- 
chants of New York City, the latter being a 
large cotton and dry goods dealer. She also 
had two half-brothers and one half-sister. Of 
her union with Mr. Wadsworth two daughters 
and four sons were born. They were : Harriet 
D., the subject of this review; James C. L. ; 
William Cooke; George, a resident of Buffalo; 
Henry, deceased; and Caroline, deceased, 
widow of General Henry Wessells, formerly 
an officer in the regular army. The mother 
spent her last years in New York City, dying 
in 1869, aged seventy- live years. She was a 
woman of true Christian spirit, and both she 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



IS 'I 



and her husband were sincere members of the 
Congregational church. 

Mrs. Kilbourne spent a few of her childhood 
years in Danbury, and then carpe to Litchfield 
with her parents, where she received her edu- 
cation in a private school. She received an 
excellent training in the domestic arts from 
her wise mother, remaining beneath the paren- 
tal roof until her union with Charles J. Kil- 
bourne, June 25, 1844. Mr. Kilbourne was 
born in Litchfield in 1820, son of Truman 
Kilbourne, who was then one of the foremost 
merchants of this town. Mr. Truman Kil- 
bourne subsequently removed to Naugatuck 
and thence to Waterbury, where he followed 
his business throughout the remainder of his 
life. He was quite prominent in financial and 
religious circles, highly respected by all, and a 
worthy member of the Congregational church, 
of which he was Deacon for many years. 

Charles J. Kilbourne received his prelimi- 
nary education in Litchfield, and began the 
study of medicine with Dr. Beckwith, a noted 
practitioner. He subsequently removed to 
Stanford, Dutchess County, N.Y., where he 
entered upon the practice of his profession, 
becoming one of the leading physicians of that 
place. He was very successful in his work, 
winning the confidence of the people and the 
thorough respect of his professional brethren. 
In 1851, owing to overwork and exposure, his 
health failed and he went South, hoping that 
rest and the mild breezes of a genial climate 
would restore his physical powers. Not find- 
ing the hoped for relief he returned to the 
place of his nativity, remaining here until his 
demise in January, 1853, at the early age of 
thirty-two years. A man of broad and liberal 
views, eminently charitable, with a heart 
abounding with love of God and his fellow- 
men, he was a true Christian, although con- 
- nected with no religious denomination by 



membership. Mrs. Kilbourne is a member of 
the Congregational church, having united with 
it many years ago, and is one of its most faith- 
ful adherents. She occupies the house which 
was purchased by her father some seventy 
years ago, and was built in 1812. It was at 
one time occupied by Colonel Talmadge, a 
well-known citizen, as a store and post-office. 
One of her brothers, James C. L. Wadsworth, 
makes his home with her. He was reared in 
this town, afterward going to Danbury, thence 
to Buffalo, N. Y. , where he clerked in a hard- 
ware store for some time. Mr. Wadsworth 
then visited California, making his home on 
the Pacific Coast for several years, and return- 
ing to Litchfield in 1892, since which time 
he has resided with Mrs. Kilbourne. 



I^aHINEHAS R. BALDWIN, a well- 
known farmer of Cornwall, was born 

-^ in that town, June 19, 18 19, son of 
Captain Phinehas and Nancy (Rexford) Bald- 
win. Mr. Baldwin's father, who was the sixth 
in a direct line to bear the name of Phinehas, 
was born in Milford, Conn. He came to 
Cornwall when quite young, to live with his 
uncle, Captain John Miles. He learned the 
carpenter's trade, an occupation which he fol- 
lowed in connection with farming. He was 
prominently identified with local affairs, and 
rendered much valuable service to the town. 
He held the rank of Captain in the State 
militia, and was always interested in military 
affairs. He lived to the age of eighty-four 
years. His wife, who was a daughter of Sam- 
uel Rexford, of Cornwall, became the mother 
of eight children; namely, Samuel Rexford, 
Lydia M., Phinehas R., John Franklin, Sarah 
Elizabeth, Harvey Woodruff, Nancy Abigail, 
and Thaddeus Robert. The mother died aged 
fifty-five years. 



152 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Phinehas R. Baldwin received his education 
in the common schools, and was brought up to 
farming, which has been his occupation through 
life. He settled upon a farm situated near the 
village, where he has since resided, occupied 
in the profitable cultivation of his land. He 
has always displayed a great deal of energy 
and ability as a farmer, and is known and 
recognized as a conscientious and fair-minded 
citizen. 

Mr. Baldwin has been twice married. In 
1854 he wedded for his first wife Sarah Jane 
Stone, daughter of Ira and Nancy Stone, of 
Warren, Conn., both of whom died at the age 
of seventy-eight years. The children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Stone were: Mary Eliza, Sarah Jane, 
James A., Nancy Maria, Fanny C. , Hannah 
Elizabeth, and Henry Daniel. Mr. Baldwin's 
first wife died at the age of twenty-five, leav- 
ing one son, Frank Stone Baldwin, who is a 
well-known resident of Cornwall and a Deacon 
of the Congregational church. In 1858 he 
wedded for his second wife Fanny C. Stone, 
his first wife's sister. 

Mr. Baldwin is a Republican in politics; and 
both he and his wife attend the Congregational 
church, of which they are members. 



I ^TeORGE W. HALL, Postmaster and 
y^J a general merchant of Falls Village, 
was born in Sheffield, Mass., Sep- 
tember 20, 1843, son of Select and Caroline 
(Bartholomew) Hall. Mr. Hall's father was 
a prosperous farmer of Sheffield, and died at 
the age of fifty-one years. His wife, daughter 
of Willis Bartholomew, became the mother of 
five children; namely, Mary J., Paulina E., 
Martha, William E., and George W. She 
died at the age of fifty-five years. 

George W. Hall received his education in 
his native town, and at the age of fourteen 



started in life as a clerk. He continued in 
that occupation seventeen years, and then erf- 
gaged in mercantile business in Falls Village. 
After conducting this enterprise for fifteen 
years he formed a stock company known as the 
George W. Hall Company. The business 
steadily grew in proportions, proving a profit- 
able investment for all concerned. The com- 
pany has now a branch store in Lakeville, 
Conn. They carry a large stock of goods. 
Mr. Hall is held in high estimation, and has 
secured a wide reputation as a man of busi- 
ness. He was Postmaster in Falls Village for 
twelve years, and is now serving his second 
term as Chairman of the Board of Selectmen. 
In 1868 Mr. Hall was united in marriage to 
Caroline Randall, daughter of A. C. Randall, 
of Falls Village. 



T^HARLES W. BARNUM, Vice-P.resi- 
I jp dent of the Barnum & Richardson 

^^. -- Company, of Lime Rock, Conn., was 

born here October 30, 1855, son of William 
H. and Charlotte A. Barnum. Hon. William 
H. Barnum was extensively engaged in iron 
manufacture and was the originator of the 
well-known firm of Barnum, Richardson & Co. 
He was a stanch Democrat, and took an active 
part in political affairs, representing the 
Fourth Connecticut District in Congress, 
1867-76, being then elected to the United 
States Senate to fill the term ending March 4, 
1879. He died in 1889, at the age of seventy 
years. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Charlotte A. Burrell, was a daughter of Charles 
Burrell. She lived to be seventy-five years 
old. They reared the following children- 
Charles W., Laura C, William M., and Lucy. 
Charles W. Barnum received his early edu- 
cation in a private school at Lime Rock. At 
the age of seventeen he went to work in his 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



15s 



father's office, and in course of time became 
one of the members of the stock company of 
which he has now been Vice-President many 
years. This company does a 'large manufact- 
uring business. In 1875 Mr. Barnum was 
united in marriage with Mary, daughter of the 
Rev. George Nickelos, of Hoosick Falls, 
N. Y. Two children have blessed their union, 
Richard N. and Charlotte. 

In politics Mr. Barnum is a Democrat. In 
religion he is an Episcopalian, his wife also 
being a communicant of the Episcopal church. 
He is prominent among the business men of 
Lime Rock, and is very popular with all 
classes, being a gentleman of liberal ideas, 
affable, and kindly. He has a beautiful resi- 
dence in the eastern part of the town, situated 
on the side of a hill. 

We are happy to present in connection with 
this brief biographical notice a portrait of 
Mr. Charles W. Barnum as the representative 
of one of the leading families of Litchfield 
County, a family whose influence has been 
widely felt in business circles and in State 
and national politics. 



LfREDERICK U. NEWCOMB, a promi- 
P J nent boot and shoe merchant of Litch- 
field, was born in Goshen, Conn., 
December 2, 1861, son of George W. and 
Mary S. (Wheeler) Newcomb. Mr. New- 
comb's grandfather, Coville Newcomb, fol- 
lowed agriculture and resided upon a farm 
situated on the line between Goshen and 
Litchfield. He became the father of twelve 
children, and died at the age of eighty years. 
George W. Newcomb, a native of Goshen, 
was reared to agricultural life. In early 
manhood he learned the trade of a house 
painter. He followed that occupation in 
Goshen until 1877, when he moved to Litch- 



field to become manager of the Rogers estate, 
a capacity in which he is still employed. He 
enlisted as a private in the Nineteenth Con- 
necticut Volunteers, and served three years in 
the Civil War, during which time he was pro- 
moted to the rank of Orderly Sergeant. His 
wife was born in Litchfield, daughter of Peleg 
and Eliza (Buel) Wheeler. The father was 
a prosperous farmer, and died at the age of 
fifty-six years. Peleg Wheeler raised a family 
of five children, of whom two are now living; 
namely, Charles G. and Mrs. George W. New- 
comb. The latter has had but one son, 
namely: Frederick U., the subject of this 
sketch. The parents are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, with which Mr. 
George W. Newcomb is officially connected. 
Frederick U. Newcomb passed his boyhood 
in Goshen, and attended the public schools. 
After completing his education he obtained 
employment with Wessells & Gates in the 
drug business. He remained for one year 
there, and then engaged with F. D. McNeil & 
Co., with whom he remained for four years 
and a half. At the expiration of that time he 
purchased a general store in the village of 
Bantam, Litchfield County, where he con- 
ducted a satisfactory business until the latter 
part of 1888. He then sold out and bought in 
Litchfield village the old established boot and 
shoe business of E. W. Meafay, which he has 
since conducted with energy and success. He 
carries a full line of attractive goods, and by 
his pleasing manners and genial disposition 
maintains a large patronage. Mr. Newcomb 
is a Republican in politics. He has served 
upon the Board of Burgesses for two years, is 
a member of St. Paul's Lodge, A. F. & 
A. M., of which he has been Junior Deacon, 
and is connected with the Sons of Veterans. 

In September, 1884, Mr. Newcomb was 
united in marriage to Edith E. Trail, born in 



156 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Litchfield, daughter of Charles L. and Louisa 
(Pratt) Trail. Her father for many years has 
been foreman of D. Buell's farm. His wife 
was the mother of four children; namely, 
Edith E. , Burton, Fannie, and Lena. Fannie 
married Edwin Potter, a house painter of 
Litchfield. Mr. and Mrs. Newcomb have one 
daughter, Frederica Edith. 



6 I HE( 



HEODORE F. DEXTER, general 
(Jjl manager of the Acme Rule Company of 
Salisbury, was born in that town No- 
\'ember i8, 1848, son of Newton L. and Lydia 
(Cook) Dexter. Mr. Dexter' s great-grand- 
father, in company with Paul Revere, rolled 
the copper which was used in covering the 
dome of the State House in Boston. 

Jeremiah Dexter, the grandfather of Theo- 
dore F. Dexter, was born in the vicinity of 
Boston. He was a mechanic ; and, after set- 
tling in Salisbury in 181 2, he established a 
factory for the manufacture of hoes, and suc- 
cessfully conducted it until his death, which 
occurred in Salisbury at an advanced age. He 
married Olive Plinsdale, and she became the 
mother of four children; namely, Newton L., 
Revere, Herman, and Maria. She died at the 
age of thirty-eight years. Newton L. Dexter, 
Mr. Dexter's father, was born in Walpole, 
Mass., and accompanied his parents to Salis- 
bury. After the death of his father he pur- 
chased the factory, added the manufacture of 
forks and potatoe hooks to that of hoes, and car- 
ried on the three departments with increased 
profit. He was prominent in public affairs, 
and was Town Clerk for several years. New- 
ton L. De.xter died in Salisbury, aged seventy- 
four years. His wife, a native of Monmouth 
County, New Jersey, became the mother of 
eight children, as follows: Jeremiah N. ; Ann 
E., who became the wife of George N. Burch ; 



Stephen H. ; Mary C. , who became Mrs. Rora- 
back ; Theodore F., the subject of this 
sketch; Hattie L., now Mrs. Cornell; Jennie; 
and Edgar C. The mother is still living in 
the old home in Salisbury. 

Theodore F. Dexter was educated in the 
schools of his native town. He worked in his 
father's factory until he reached his majority. 
He then engaged in the insurance business in 
New York State for a year, at the expiration 
of which he returned to Salisbury, and later 
entered mercantile business as a clerk. In 
1890 he became book-keeper for the Acme 
Rule Company of Salisbury, from which posi- 
tion he has rapidly advanced to his present 
post of general manager. He is a progressive 
business man and a most valuable official to 
the company. Mr. Dexter is a Republican in 
politics, and has for several years been a 
member of the Town Committee. In 1890 he 
assisted in taking the United States Census, 
and is at the present time serving as Town 
Clerk. In 1884 he was united in marriage to 
Mary L. Spurr, of Sheffield, Mass. Mr. and 
Mrs. Dexter are members of the Congrega- 
tional church. 




ORRAIN APLEY, a prominent farmer 
of Goshen and a member of the Board 
of Selectmen, was born upon the 
farm he now owns and occupies, December 17, 
1839, son of Hiram and Caroline (Bierce) 
Apley. Mr. Apley's grandparents were Eze- 
kiel and Sally (Rood) Apley, the former of 
whom was a prosperous farmer of Goshen, 
where the greater portion of his life was 
passed. He died at the age of eighty-six 
years. His children were: Alfred, Hiram, 
Lorrain, and Mary. The mother died at the 
age of eighty-four years. 

Hiram Apley, Mr. Apleys father, was born 
in Torrington, Conn. ; but he resided in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



IS7 



Goshen after he was four years old. He had 
a farm which he successfully cultivated during 
the active period of his life. He lived to the 
age of eighty-three years and eight months. 
His wife, daughter of Sylvester Bierce, of 
Cornwall, became the mother of three chil- 
dren : Lorrain, Edwin, and Elizabeth. Edwin 
married Eliza Howe, and died October 9, 
1867, aged twenty-five years, leaving two chil- 
dren, Levi and Julia. The latter became the 
wife of James Leonard, and has one son named 
Hiram. Caroline (Bierce) Apley died March 
II, 1876, aged sixty-five years. 

Lorrain Apley received his education in the 
district schools and was reared to agricultural 
life. He succeeded to the possession of the 
homestead. The estate contains three hundred 
and seventy-five acres of well-located land, on 
which he has conducted general farming with 
energy and good judgment. He is a Republi- 
can in politics, and has ably filled various 
ofifices of public trust. He is now serving his 
sixth term as member of the Board of Select- 
men, a position in which he is rendering val- 
uable service to the town. Mr. Apley is a 
member of Seneca Lodge, No. 55, A. F. & 
A. M., and also of the Grange. 




RS. RACHEL L. PRATT, an 
esteemed resident of Salisbury, 
widow of the late Daniel Pratt, 
who was for many years Town Clerk of Salis- 
bury, was born in that town, April 27, 1823. 
She is the daughter of Chauncy and Lavinia 
(Spencer) Reed, both natives of Salisbury, and 
grand-daughter of Josiah Reed. Grandfather 
Reed came here from the southern part of 
Connecticut, and purchased the farm that con- 
tained the Chatfield ore bed. He married 
Elizabeth Marvin, with whom he reared a fam- 
ily of seven children. They were: Marvin, 



Silas, Lydia, Betsey, Susan, Chauncy, and 
Charles. 

Chauncy Reed, the father of Mrs. Pratt, 
spent his life in Salisbury, engaged in farm- 
ing. He owned a good farm near the centre 
of the town, and was well known and re- 
spected. He lived to be eighty years of age. 
His wife, who was a daughter of Job Spencer, 
of Salisbury, passed away at the age of 
seventy. Their children were: Spencer J.; 
Chauncey; Henry J.; Theron ; Jarie; and 
Rachel L. , the subject of this sketch. 

Rachel L. Reed on July 29, 1851, became 
Mrs. Pratt, uniting her destiny with that of 
Daniel Pratt, son of Schuyler and Olive (Gay) 
Pratt. Schuyler Pratt died in his sixty-third 
year; and his wife lived through the vicissi- 
tudes of a century, being over ninety-nine 
years of age at the time of her death. They 
reared the following children : Milton, 
Charles, Daniel, Henry, Mary, Harrison, 
Olive, and Louise. Daniel Pratt was engaged 
in the cotton business in the South until the 
war broke out. He then returned North, and, 
purchasing an estate in Salisbury, there spent 
the rest of his life. A Democrat in politics, 
he was a leading citizen in the town, and held 
the office of Town Clerk for twenty years. He 
passed away in January, 1890, at the age of 
sixty-seven years, leaving his widow in com- 
fortable circumstances. Mrs. Rachel L. Pratt 
still lives in the old home endeared to her by 
memories of the past. She and her husband 
were the parents of four children, as follows: 
Schuyler, who died at the age of twenty-six ; 
Ellen, who died at the age of four years; Cora 
L. , whose brief span of life embraced but six 
summers; and Henry R., who married and is 
now living in Chappaqua, N. Y. Represent- 
ing two of the old families of the town, a lady 
of culture, and in possession of many other 
estimable qualities, Mrs. Pratt is highly re- 



iS8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



spected by her neighbors. She bears the 
weight of her seventy years gracefully, and 
appears to be much younger than she is. 




jDMUND D. LAWRENCE, a retired 
business man of Canaan, Conn., son of 
Harvey and Betsey (Dunning) Law- 
rence, was born in this town January 20, 
1820. Mr. Lawrence's grandfather, Josiah 
Lawrence, was a native of Canaan, and for 
many years kept the hotel in the village. He 
died at the age of sixty-seven. Josiah Law- 
rence was twice married. His first wife, Amy 
Rockwell, left five children : Abiah, Harvey, 
Abigail, Betsey, and Charlotte. By his sec- 
ond union he had two children, Isaac and 
George. 

Harvey Lawrence, son of Josiah and Amy 
(Rockwell) Lawrence, was born in Canaan on 
March 19, 1791. He became quite prominent 
in public affairs, serving in important town 
offices, and was Trial Justice for many years. 
His wife, Betsey Dunning, whom he married 
November 22, 1812, became the mother of 
three children, as follows: Amy; Edmund D., 
the subject of this sketch; and Catherine. 
Mrs. Harvey Lawrence died September 21, 
1865. Her husband died July 21, 1870. 

Edmund, who was the only son, resided 
with his parents until reaching the age of 
eighteen, at which time he began life for him- 
self. His first employment was in an iron 
manufactory, where he received twelve dollars 
and fifty cents per month as a start. He be- 
came proficient in the work, and remained 
there for fifteen years. Mr. Lawrence then 
engaged in mercantile business for two years, 
and was agent for seven years for a manufact- 
uring concern in Norfolk, the following six 
years being' spent in different businesses. 
During the next seven years he was connected 



with a sash and blind factory. After fifteen 
years of prosperity in the lime business, his 
next venture, he retired from active labor. 
Mr. Lawrence is a Republican in politics, and 
has been prominently identified with local 
public affairs, serving as a member of the 
Board of Selectmen and as an Assessor. In 
1855 Mr. Lawrence was united in marriage 
with Lydia Rood, daughter of Dennis Rood, 
of Canaan. Their only child is an adopted 
daughter, a niece, named Emma Adams 
Lawrence. 

A faithful likeness of Mr. Edmund D. Law- 
rence is herewith presented. He is a man 
whose success in life has been the result of his 
practical ability and close application to busi- 
ness. His interest in the higher needs of the 
community and his generosity are shown in his 
gift to the town, in 1885, of a building which 
cost thirteen hundred dollars for a public 
library. 



B 



AVID K. BIERCE, the owner of a 
fine farm two miles south of Sharon, 
and one of the most enterprising and 
substantial citizens of the town, was born in 
Cornwall, Litchfield County, Conn., on October 
20, 1833, son of Obadiah and Sybil (Clark) 
Bierce, and grandson of James Bierce, who 
came from England. James Bierce was with 
the British army at the building of the fort at 
Crown Point on Lake Champlain. He resided 
in Cornwall, was a farmer, and spent the major 
part of his life engaged in that occupation. 
He died at the advanced age of ninety-five 
years. Obadiah Bierce, the youngest of a 
large family of children, was born in Corn- 
wall. At an early age he learned the trade of 
a millwright, and followed that calling during 
his younger days. Later on he conducted a 
grist and oil mill at Cornwall Bridge. In 
addition to his mill property he owned about 




EDMUND D. LAWRENCE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



i6i 



seven hundred acres of land in the town. He 
was eighty-five years old at the time of his 
death. His wife, who was a native of Bur- 
lington, Conn., also attained the same age. 
They reared seven children; namely. Flora, 
Sarah, Hercules, Edward, David K., Frank, 
and Frances. 

David K, Bierce remained with his parents 
until he came of age. He then went West, 
but a short time afterward returned to Corn- 
wall, and for six years was successfully en- 
gaged in the hotel business at Cornwall 
Bridge. From there he removed to Amenia, 
N. Y., where he spent the subsequent five years 
in agricultural pursuits. In 1868 he came to 
Sharon and purchased the place on which he 
now resides, a very productive farm of one 
hundred and twenty acres. Besides engaging 
in mixed husbandry he makes a specialty of 
dairying. In 1858 he was joined in marriage 
with Miss Temperance Cooper, a daughter of 
Hiram Cooper, of Amenia, N.Y. They are 
the parents of three children, as follows : Mrs. 
Emma Decker, their only daughter, who has 
one child, Manzer; George, married to Miss 
Ann Brown, a daughter of Josiah Brown, and 
father of two daughters — Stella and Ellen; 
and Arthur O. , married to Miss Lizzie Oean, 
daughter of Edward K. Dean, by whom he is 
the father of two children — David and Olive. 
In politics Mr. Bierce is a loyal Republican. 
He has served his town as Assessor for several 
years, and at the present time holds the ofifice 
of Selectman. 

« ^»^» - 

tOBERT G. HASSARD, M.D., a pop- 
ular and successful physician of 
_^ Thomaston, was born in Great Bar- 
rington, Mass., May 23, 1841, son of Samuel 
and Sarah G. (Cook) Hassard. The Hassard 
family are of English lineage, and looking 
backward along the line of descent it is found 



that the first progenitor in this country came 
to America in 1639. Since that time the 
majority of the descendants have spent their 
lives in the New England States. The great- 
grandfather of Dr. Hassard, who bore the 
name of Samuel Hassard, was a native of 
Rhode Island. He spent the larger part of 
his life in the business of a West Indies 
trader. His son, Robert Hassard, who was 
also born in Rhode Island, spent much of his 
life in the West Indies, where he had stores 
and also conducted a large plantation. He 
died when but forty-two years of age. 

Samuel Hassard, born in Jamaica, lived 
with his parents in the West Indies only until 
he was six years of age. He was then sent to 
New England to obtain his education. As his 
father died a short time after, he did not return " 
to the West Indies. He afterward took up 
the study of medicine. This he subsequently 
dropped, to engage in the study of theology at 
Yale College, where he graduated in 1826. 
He then took a course at the Andover Theor 
logical Seminary. On leaving the latter he 
preached for a time in Taunton, Mass., and 
still later became the rector of St. James' 
Church at Barrington, Mass., where he re- 
mained until his death. Like his father, he 
lived but forty-two years. His wife, Sarah 
G. (Cook) Hassard, was a daughter of John 
Cook, of Taunton, Mass., where she was born 
on February 29, 18 16. Her parents, who 
were married when they were but fourteen 
years old, reared a family of twelve children. 
She died on October 9, 1887, seventy-two 
years of age, leaving but one child. Dr. Rob- 
ert G. Hassard. The Rev. Samuel Hassard 
and his wife were both members of the Episco- 
pal church, and were held in the highest 
esteem by his parishioners. 

Robert G. Hassard lived with his parents in 
Great Barrington, Mass., until he was nine 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



years old. He then went to New Haven, 
Conn., where he remained until he attained 
his majority, acquiring hi.s early education in 
the common schools and graduating from Yale 
College in the class of 1862. At the very 
beginning of the Civil War, in 1861, he 
entered the army with the first regiment that 
left the State of Connecticut, and was gone 
three months when he received his honorable 
discharge. On his return to New Haven he 
was made Acting Medical Cadet; and after 
his graduation from Yale College he was ex- 
amined by the Army Board and received an 
appointment as Assistant Surgeon with the 
rank of First Lieutenant in the Nineteenth 
Connecticut Regiment. He was afterward 
transferred to the Second Heavy Artillery, 
with which he remained until he was mustered 
out of service in August, 1865. He returned 
again to New Haven, but not long after re- 
moved to Bridgeport, Conn., where during 
the following year he was successfully en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession. The 
next two years he spent in the West, from 
which he once more returned to New Haven. 
Some time later he went to Brooklyn, N. Y., 
and became the acting surgeon of the police 
department. After remaining here until 1880 
he came back to Connecticut and settled in 
Litchfield County. Since then he has ac- 
quired a lucrative practice in the towns of 
Harwinton and Thomaston. 

In 1 88 1 he was married to Miss Lela M. 
Udell, daughter of Alanson Udell, a merchant 
of New York City. Although Republican in 
his political views. Dr. Hassard casts his vote 
for the man he considers best qualified for the 
ofifice to be filled. He is a member of the 
C. L. Russell Post, No. 68, Grand Army of 
the Republic, of which he has acted as surgeon 
since its organization. He and his wife are 
active and influential members of the Episco- 



pal church of Thomaston, while his wife is 
connected with the different church societies. 



TfREE 



REDERICK G. DEAN, a prosperous 
p[; farmer of Falls Village, was born in 
Canaan, Litchfield County, Conn., 
February 9, 1839, son of Edmund M. and 
Susan C. (Butler) Dean. Mr. Dean's grand- 
father, Solomon Dean, was a successful farmer 
and a lifelong resident of Canaan. His family 
consisted of ten children, named respectively: 
Luther, William, Edmund M., Horace, 
Electa, Eunice, Mary, Sarah, Julia, and 
Nancy. Edmund M. Dean, Mr. Dean's 
father, was born in Canaan. He was trained 
to agriculture, and followed that occupation 
with energy and success during his whole 
life. His wife, Susan C. Butler, was a 
daughter of Calvin Butler, of Cornwall. She 
became the mother of three children, namely: 
Frederick G., whose name appears at the head 
of this sketch; Myron H., who married Anna 
B. Goslee, and has two children, Alice C. 
and Winifred; and Marshall, who married 
Emma Millard, and has five children, 
namely — Nellie, Arthur, Bessie, Harry, and 
Mabel. 

Frederick G. Dean was educated in the 
district schools and at the Amenia Academy, 
and after completing his studies taught 
school for two seasons. He has always re- 
sided at the Dean homestead, which is one of 
the most productive farms in the town ; and 
he conducts general farming with good re- 
sults. In 1869 Mr. Dean was united in mar- 
riage to Ellen E. Jaqua, daughter of Porter 
M. Jaqua, of Canaan. Mr. Dean has fre- 
quently been solicited to accept ofifice, but he 
prefers to remain out of politics and give his 
entire attention to the management of his 
farm. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



163 



7TAOLONEL HENRY W. WESSELLS, 
I \r manager of a large drug store in 
V,2_^- Litchfield and Secretary of the 
Litchfield Mutual Fire Insurance Company, 
was born July 13, 1845, in the town of New 
Milford, this county. Leverett Wessells, his 
father, was born in Litchfield, July 28, 1819, 
where Ashbel Wessells, father of Leverett and 
grandfather of Colonel Wessells, was then 
residing, being one of its leading physicians. 
Dr. Wessells was born in Groton, New Lon- 
don County, and there studied medicine. He 
subsequently located in this county, and here 
built up a large general practice, becoming 
quite noted as a healer of all diseases, spend- 
ing his life in the practice of his profession. 

Leverett Wessells, one of the three sons 
born to his parents, was reared and educated 
in this locality, becoming a leader in the com- 
munity. He took an active part in public 
affairs, and was Deputy Sheriff from 1842 
until 1851, Sheriff of the county from 1854 
until 1866, and the village Postmaster for two 
terms. As one of the ablest and most intelli- 
gent men of the vicinity he was selected to 
represent his fellow-townsmen in the State 
legislature on two occasions, serving on impor- 
tant committees each time. Prior to the late 
Civil War he was Captain of the State militia; 
and while the Rebellion was in progress he 
organized the Nineteenth Connecticut Volun- 
teer Infantry, which was afterward known as 
the Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He 
was commissioned Colonel of the regiment 
July 28, 1862, holding this rank until Septem- 
ber 15, 1863, when ill health compelled him 
to resign. The regiment, which was one of 
the finest at the front, achieved an honorable 
war record, actively participating in the fol- 
lowing actions: North Anna, Cold Harbor, 
Petersburg, Winchester, Fisher's Hill, Cedar 
Creek, Hatch's Run, Fort Fisher, Petersburg 



(a second action), and at Sailor's Creek — and 
losing, through killed, wounded, and captured, 
four hundred and thirty-one men. From the 
time of his resignation until the close of the 
war Colonel Leverett Wessells was Provost 
Marshal of the Fourth Connecticut District, 
and was subsequently Quartermaster-general 
on Governor Andrew's staff, being known in 
his last years as General Wessells. He was 
prominent in local as well as military affairs, 
and served as a member of the Board of Chari- 
ties for several years. He died here at the 
age of seventy-six. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Mary Parks, lived to the age of 
seventy years. She was the daughter of 
Josiah Parks, formerly owner of all the stage 
routes running from this town, including those 
to Poughkeepsie and to Hartford. She reared 
but two children, namely : Grace, who became 
the wife of Dr. Gates, of New Hartford; and 
Henry W. She was a most estimable woman, 
sharing with her husband the esteem of the 
community. Both were valued members of 
the Episcopal church. 

Colonel Henry W. Wessells, having ac- 
quired his preliminary education in the pub- 
lic schools of his native town, concluded 
his studies at the Gunnery in Washington, 
Conn. After his graduation from that famous 
institution he came to Litchfield, and was for 
some time engaged in the railway mail ser- 
vice, running on different roads of the State. 
Abandoning that life, the Colonel accepted 
his present position as secretary of the local 
insurance company, faithfully and ably per- 
forming his duties in this capacity since. In 
financial matters he is very skilful, very sys- 
tematic and thorough in his methods, and is 
eminently trustworthy and capable. 

In 1876 Colonel Wessells married Anne E. 
Dottefer, a native of the Keystone State. A 
lady of rare culture and refinement, she pre- 



164 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 




sides most gracefully over their pleasant home, 
which is a centre of social activity. The 
Colonel in politics is a strong Republican. 
He has served his constituents as Warden of 
the borough for two years. Formerly he was 
Lieutenant of Company H, Fourth Regiment 
of the Connecticut National militia. He is a 
prominent member of the Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, of the Colonial Society of 
1 81 2, and of the Loyal Legion. Both he and 
his wife are faithful members of the Episcopal 
church, he being a Vestryman; while Mrs. 
Wessells is an active worker in the church 
society. 

JRS. MARY (ROWLEY) BAIRD, 
widow of the late Theophilus 
Baird, who died at his home in 
Winsted, December 4, 1894, is a most esti- 
mable woman, and highly esteemed by all 
who have the pleasure of her personal ac- 
quaintance. Mr. Baird, born in 1825 iri 
Watertown, N.Y., was of Scotch parentage. 
Nathaniel Baird, his father, was born, bred, 
and married in Scotland. The father soon 
after his marriage emigrated to America. 
He took up his residence in Watertown, 
N.Y., where he spent his remaining years, 
employed as a book-keeper, a capacity in 
which he was very expert. He reared a fam- 
ily of eight children, of whom three daughters 
and two sons are now living, all residents of 
either Watertown or Brooklyn. 

Theophilus Baird was a man of excellent 
business habits and judgment and a typical 
representative of the self-made men of his 
day. He possessed in a high degree the 
characteristics of Scotland's sons — self-re- 
liance, industry, and thrift— that are sure to 
win ultimate success in life. Starting in life 
empty-handed, he accumulated a fortune be- 
fore its close, leaving his widow with a good 



estate. He was engaged in business in Win- 
sted as druggist for more than thirty years, 
and was quite active and liberal in the sup- 
port of all enterprises conducive to the wel- 
fare of the town. In politics he uniformly 
cast his vote with the Republican party. He 
was a Trustee of the Gilbert School, a Di- 
rector in the Winsted Savings Bank, a Master 
Mason in the Masonic fraternity, and was a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. He was a regular attendant and a 
generous supporter of the First Congrega- 
tional Church, of which Mrs. Baird is an es- 
teemed and conscientious member. In 1883 
Mr. Baird built the fine home now owned 
and occupied by his widow, and resided there 
contented until called to his final rest. 

Mrs. Baird has been a lifelong resident of 
this town. She is a daughter of Horace and 
Sally (Dutton) Rowley, respectively natives 
of Haddam and New Hartford. They were 
married in 1827, took up a farm in Winsted, 
and were among the well-to-do and enterpris- 
ing members of the agricultural community. 
They reared the four children born to them. 
These are: James, who lives in Winsted; 
Mary, now Mrs. Baird; Dewel Rowley, of 
Winsted; and Caroline, wife of Marcus Baird, 
of Brooklyn, N.Y., who is a brother of the 
late Theophilus Baird. 



;;^ERUSHA (BASS) BUTLER, a bright 
and intelligent woman of fourscore 
years, notable for her sweet womanli- 
ness and beautiful personality, was bom in 
the town of Colebrook, November 29, 18 14, 
being a daughter of Henry Bass, also a native 
of this place. Mrs. Butler is descended from 
honored Revolutionary and pioneer stock. 
Her paternal grandfather, Nathan Bass, who 
was born, it is supposed, at East Windsor, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



^6S 



Conn., located in Colebrook in 1766, being 
one of the original settlers of the town. He 
served in the Revolutionary War, and died in 
New York ere his term of enlistment had ex- 
pired. The maiden name of his wife, thus 
early left a widow, was Anna Rockwell, a 
native of East Windsor. 

Henry Bass, the father of Mrs. Butler, early 
evinced a taste for agricultural pursuits, and 
when a youth went to live with his brother- 
in-law, and there assisted on the farm. His 
first purchase of land was on Beach Hill, 
where he resided for a time before selling it. 
He subsequently bought a farm west of the' 
centre of the town, and there engaged in 
mixed husbandry until his death, which oc- 
curred at the advance age of eighty years. He 
married Jerusha Holmes, who was born at Tor- 
rington, a daughter of Joseph and Lydia 
(Curtis) Holmes. They became the parents 
of eight children; namely, Sidney H., 
Belaria, Elvira, Lucia L., Jerusha (Mrs. 
Butler), Henry, Warren A., and Lucien O. 
The latter, who was a skilled machinist, fol- 
lowed the trade in Ohio for a number of years, 
and then returned to the old homestead, where 
his death occurred, August 8, 1894. He 
never married, and with the exception of the 
time he spent in Ohio was a lifelong resident 
of his native town. He served it with faith- 
fulness in various oiifices of trust, besides rep- 
resenting it in the State legislature. 

Jerusha (Bass) Butler was reared to habits 
of industry by her good mother, who was pro- 
ficient in all the domestic arts, including 
carding, spinning, and weaving. She re- 
mained at home, assisting in the labors of the 
household until her marriage, at the age of 
twenty-five years, to Timothy Butler, a native 
of this county and a son of Jared and Eunice 
(Couch) Butler. He was the recipient of an 
excellent education, and when quite a young 



man began his career as a teacher, a profes- 
sion in which he was engaged during the 
winters for a number of years. He also 
learned the carpenter's trade, for which he 
had a natural inclination, and worked at that 
for some time; but on his marriage he bought 
a farm in Pennsylvania, near Bethany, where 
he pursued farming for about two years. His 
health being very poor, he returned to Cole- 
brook, where his earthly life was closed, Jan- 
uary 4, 1842. Mrs. Butler has since been a 
resident of this pleasant village, making her 
home with her only daughter, Mary Eunice, 
the wife of A. Robbins Allen. Mr. Allen 
was born in Colebrook, and is of honored an- 
cestry, being a son of Lewis and Elizabeth 
(Robbins) Allen, and on the paternal side 
the grandson of Justus and Mabel Allen. On 
the maternal side of the house he is the 
grandson of Ammi and Salome Robbins and 
the great-grandson of the Rev. Ammi Ru- 
hamah Robbins, the first pastor of the First 
Congregational Church of Norfolk, Litchfield 
County. Mr. Allen is a leading member of 
the agricultural community, being now the 
owner of the ancestral acres on which he was 
born and bred. Three children have been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Allen : James W., 
Grace L, and Lewis- T. These are a comfort 
and a source of great pleasure to their grand- 
mother Butler, as well as to their fond 
parents. 



EORGE ALLEN WHEATON, a 




3 I successful husbandman of Cornwall 
Centre, was born -July 30, 1821, on 
the place which he now occupies, and which 
has always been his home. He is a son of 
George and Lewey (Allen) Wheaton and a 
grandson of Jonathan Wheaton. George 
Wheaton was a native of Wallingford, Conn. 
He studied law under the guidance of Judge 



i66 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



L. W. Church, of Salisbury, Conn. ; and, 
after being admitted to the bar, he opened an 
office in Cornwall, where throughout the rest 
of his life he was successfully engaged in the 
practice of his profession. Whatever in his 
opinion would promote the welfare or enhance 
the beauty of his town always elicited his 
interest. He was looked upon by the people 
of that community as a man of reliable judg- 
ment. In addition to serving his town in 
official position, he was at one time a mem- 
ber of the State legislature. He lived to be 
seventy-five years of age. His wife was a 
daughter of Medad Allen. They reared three 
children: Nancy, who married William Bald- 
win; Cynthia, the wife of Elbert Shepard; 
and George Allen. 

George Allen Wheaton obtained his educa- 
tion in the district schools of Cornwall. At 
an early age he became familiar with the 
duties of an agriculturist. Since he started 
in life for himself he has been successfully 
engaged in general farming on the old home- 
stead, of which he is now the owner. He 
was married in 1841 to Miss Artimecia Bald- 
win, a daughter of Henry Baldwin, of Corn- 
wall. They are the parents of four children, 
namely: George H., who married Miss Ger- 
trude Fitch, and died aged' thirty years, leav- 
ing one daughter— -Jessie; Mrs. Lewey A. 
Dean, a widow with two children — Edith 
and George S. ; Hattie N. who married 
James A. Cochrane, and has a son and daugh- 
ter—George and Jessie; and Charles, who 
died in the twentieth year of his age. 

In politics Mr. Wheaton is a Democrat. 
All through the war he was a Deputy Marshal 
at Bridgeport, Conn. He has since served 
as Deputy Sheriff for twelve years, and in 
1855 he was a member of the State Senate. 
He is a member of St. Luke's Lodge, Kent, 
A. F. & A. M. 



^JJ^ELSON DRAKE FORD, one of the 
I =Y foremost business men of Winchester, 
-^ x^ ^ Conn., having been a worthy repre- 
sentative of the agricultural and manufactur- 
ing interests of this town for upward of half a 
century, is a native of Litchfield County. 
He was born November 29, 1825, in the town 
of Torrington. His father, Harvey Ford, was 
born in Bethany, New Haven County, Febru- 
ary I, 1802, being a son of Amos Ford, who 
was a native of the town of Cheshire in the 
same county, the date of his birth being 
April 29, 1767. From the most authentic 
sources attainable we find that the Fords are 
of English ancestry, the first to emigrate to 
America having made his home for a while in 
Plymouth, Conn. In 1639 he settled in what 
is now Woodbridge, New Haven County, 
where his descendants lived for several gener- 
ations, the great-grandfather of Nelson D. 
Ford removing thence to what is now Pros- 
pect, then a part of Cheshire, and known as 
the Columbia Society, there engaging in 
general farming. 

Amos Ford was a son of Nathan Ford, Jr., 
and a grandson of Nathan Ford, Sr. John 
Ford, a brother of Amos, and by trade a car- 
penter and joiner, emigrated in his early life 
to Ohio, and accumulated a fortune of one 
hundred thousand dollars. One son, whom he 
educated at Yale College, became Governor of 
Ohio. His name as originally spelled was 
Sebra Ford, but he changed it to Seabury Ford. 
Amos Ford was born and reared in Cheshire, 
where, in addition to tilling the soil and im- 
proving a good farm, he raised flax, which he 
dressed and prepared for manufacturing pur- 
poses. He lived to a ripe old age, spending 
his last years with his children. The maiden 
name of his wife was Rachel M. Russell. 

Harvey Ford, following in the footsteps of 
his ancestors, selected farming as his life oc- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



169 



cupation, carrying it on for a while in Torring- 
tqn, where he resided a few years after his 
marriage. In the spring of 1827 he came to 
Winchester, buying the farm where his son 
Nelson now lives, which is in one of the most 
fertile regions of the county. The land lies 
on both sides of the Naugatuck River; and in 
1 84s he took advantage of the water-power by 
building a dam and erecting a saw-mill and 
cheese-box factory, putting in a set of stones 
for grinding and all the other needed machin- 
ery. These mills he operated in addition to 
his agricultural labors until after his second 
marriage, when he sold out to his sons, and 
removed to Plymouth, going thence to Bristol, 
where he bought a farm, on which he resided 
until his death, at the age of fourscore years. 
He was first married to Mary Ann Drake, a 
native of Torrington, and a daughter of Noah 
and Polly (Fyler) Drake. She died at the 
age of sixty, leaving her two children : Nel- 
son D., of whom we write; and Reuben 
Fyler, now a resident of Stonington, Conn. 

Nelson D. Ford was less than two years of 
age when his parents brought him to Win- 
chester, where he was educated, receiving all 
the advantages afforded by the town, includ- 
ing three terms in select schools. He began 
when but a boy to assist on the farm and in 
the mill and shop, residing with his parents, 
with the exception of three years, until after 
the death of his mother. In company with 
his brother he subsequently bought the home 
farm and the mill property, they operating 
them in partnership until 1875, when they 
divided. Nelson taking the mill property and 
a small part of the farm, including the house 
he now occupies. He has since been actively 
engaged in milling, and continues the manu- 
facture of cheese boxes, his being the oldest 
established cheese-box factory in this section 
of the State. 



The ceremony uniting the destinies of Mr. 
Ford and Mary Ann Norton was solemnized 
September 25, 1853. Mrs. Ford was born in 
Goshen, being a daughter of Charles Lyman 
and Anna Maria (Bailey) Norton and on the 
paternal side a grand -daughter of Stephen and 
Hannah (Coy) Norton. Her maternal grand- 
parents were Philo and Samantha (Root) 
Bailey, early settlers in these parts. Mr. and 
Mrs. Ford have one son, Lyman Norton Ford, 
who was born October 29, 1872. He ac- 
quired his education in the district school 
and at the Winsted High School, and is at 
present associated with his father in business, 
being a very competent young man, full of 
energy and push. He is an efficient surveyor, 
and in 1894 was elected a Justice of the 
Peace. He married Nellie M. Jessup, a na- 
tive of Norfolk, born December 13, 1874, a 
daughter of Edwin and Josephine (Williams) 
Jessup. They have one son, Harvey Nelson 
Ford, born February 14, 1894. 

Mr. Nelson D. Ford has held many local 
public offices, having been a member of the 
Board of Selectmen, Justice of the Peace a 
number of years, a chairman of the Board of 
Relief; and in 1877 he was chosen to repre- 
sent his town in the legislature. He is an ac- 
tive Democrat, of the old Jeffersonian school, 
and is ever ready to do aught in his power to 
further the interests of his party. His faith- 
fulness to his trusts, his integrity, and his 
excellent sense in business, have won for him 
the respect and confidence of the community. 

An excellent likeness of Mr. Ford will be 
found on another page of this volume. 



/^^TeORGE gilbert, a substantial and 

y5T highly esteemed farmer, residing 

about three miles from Litchfield, 

on the Torrington road, was born in North- 



lyo 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



field, Conn., January 21, 1822, son of Linus 
and Maria (Tolles) Gilbert. Mr. Gilbert's 
grandfather, who was a resident of North 
Haven, moved to Northfield, where he spent 
the rest of his days engaged in farming. His 
son, Linus, who was but eighty years old at 
the time of the removal to Northfield, was 
trained to farm work, at which he toiled 
from an early age. He remained at home, 
and at his father's death came into posses- 
sion of the farm, which he conducted for the 
remainder of his life. His death occurred at 
the age of eighty-two years. His wife, who 
was a native of this county, reared two chil- 
dren, of whom George Gilbert, whose name 
appears at the head of this sketch, survives. 
She died on the old homestead at the ripe 
age of eighty-one. 

George Gilbert resided at home with his 
parents until the age of twenty-one, acquir- 
ing the elements of a practical education as 
opportunity afforded. Soon after he pur- 
chased his present farm of one hundred acres, 
on which he has resided for over fifty con- 
secutive years, leading the tranquil, even life 
of a tiller of the soil. He makes a specialty 
of dairying, producing a fine grade of table 
butter. He has a large patronage among the 
best people of Litchfield. Mr. Gilbert was 
married in 1843 to Miss Emeline A. Curtis, 
daughter of Jason Curtis, a lifelong farmer of 
Northfield. Mrs. Gilbert is the mother of 
three children, namely: Emma Jane, who 
married C. Newbury; Joseph L., who resides 
at home, and is employed in the brass works 
at Torrington; and Cora B., who became the 
wife of Edwin Blakeslee, a farmer of Plym- 
outh, and is the mother of three boys Benja- 
min O., Raymond A., and Charles Gilbert. 

Mr. Gilbert is a Democrat in politics. He 
has served his town acceptably as a member 
of the Board of Relief and in other minor 



offices. He has been a member of the local 
Grange for many years. Both he and his 
wife are communicants of the Episcopal 
church in Torrington, which Mr. Gilbert has 
long served as Warden. He was one of the 
original organizers of the church nearly fifty 
years ago, and took a prominent part in the 
erection of the building. He was also for 
many years superintendent of the Sunday- 
school, and has labored zealously in sundry 
ways to advance the interests of the parish. 
He and his wife have passed that rarely 
reached milestone on life's highway, the 
golden wedding day; and, still young in 
spirit, they journey on together in quiet con- 
tent, hoping to hear, when their journey's 
end is reached, the Master say, "Well 
done." 



W' 



ILLIAM PENUEL LAWRENCE, 
who has been a resident of Cole- 
brook since the date of his birth, 
December 31, 1833, is a practical and progres- 
sive agriculturist and one of its most respected 
citizens. His father, Pen^pel Lawrence, was 
born, it is thought, in the town of Killingly, 
Windham County, in which his parents, 
James and Dorothy Lawrence, spent the major 
part, if not the whole, of their lives. He 
there learned the trade of a stone mason, but 
after coming to Colebrook engaged in farm- 
ing for several years, working by the day or 
month. Soon after his marriage he bought a 
small farm, which is included in the home- 
stead now owned and occupied by the subject 
of this article. He was very ambitious and 
frugal, toiling unceasingly in the care of his 
land; and, as his means increased, he added 
to his original acreage, rebuilt and added to 
the buildings, and bought a saw-mill near by, 
adding the manufacture of lumber to his other 
industries. He was considered one of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



171 



best farmers in the locality, and continued in 
these occupations until his death in 1864, 
when sixty-five years old. The maiden 
name of his wife, who was his faithful help- 
mate and counsellor through life, was Laura 
Barber, a native of Canton, Hartford County, 
and a daughter of Michael and Anna (Taylor) 
Barber. Four children were born of their 
union; namely, Luther A., William P., 
Martin H., and Laura A. 

William P. Lawrence was educated in the 
public schools, becoming thoroughly familiar 
with the branches there taught. At the age 
of nineteen years he became a teacher, and 
met with such success that he continued in 
the profession for twelve consecutive winter 
terms. During this period he spent his free 
time working upon the farm or in the mill 
with his father. Remaining always on the 
parental homestead, Mr. Lawrence subse- 
quently became its owner, and has since 
managed it successfully. The land, being 
rich and fertile, yields excellent crops. :He 
has invested from time to time in standing 
timber, which he has manufactured into 
lumber; and for the past fourteen years he 
has added a substantial ice business to his 
other industries, marketing his ice in Win- 
sted. His ability and wisdom as an agricult- 
urist and a business man are unquestioned, 
the fine condition of his property being con- 
vincing testimony of his judicious manage- 
ment, industry, and thrift. 

The marriage of Mr. Lawrence with Miss 
Sarah Eveline Hewitt was performed Novem- 
ber 21, i860. She was born in Winsted, 
being a daughter of John Hewitt, who emi- 
grated from England to the United States 
before he was twenty-one years old. He lo- 
cated in the town of Winsted, where he 
learned the trade of a stone cutter, which was 
his occupation for many years, and remained 



a resident of the place until his decease, at 
the age of seventy-two years. When a young 
man he married Eliza Leach, who was born 
in Salisbury, and died in Winsted, at the 
venerable age of eighty-six years. They 
reared three children ; namely. Marietta, 
Sarah E. (Mrs. Lawrence), and Charles L. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence have but two sons 
living, Charles D. and Robert W., their 
youngest son, J. Russell, having lived but 
eight years and five months. They are 
worthy members of the Colebrook Congrega- 
tional Church. He is Deacon of the church, 
and was superintendent of the Sunday-school 
for upward of a quarter of a century. He fills 
all positions of trust with fidelity, and has 
served as Postmaster at Mill Brook since 
1872. 

RION J. HALLOCK, an extensive 
farmer and land-owner of Goshen and 
formerly a member of the Connecticut 
legislature, was born in that town, Septem- 
ber 9, 1831, son of Dudley F. and Anna M. 
(Bailey) Hallock. Mr. Hallock's grand- 
parents were Denis and Lydia (Ford) Hal- 
lock, respectively natives of Durham, N.Y., 
and Cornwall, Conn. Denis Hallock was 
a tailor by trade, and followed that occupa- 
tion until his death. His children were: 
Julia and Dudley F. Hallock. 

Dudley F. Hallock, Mr. Hallock's father, 
was born in Durham, and accompanied his 
mother to Cornwall, Conn., when he was two 
years of age. He learned the trade of a shoe- 
maker, which he followed until reaching the 
age of thirty years; and then he acquired the 
trade of a carpenter. He resided in Goshen 
after his marriage, and died in 1840, aged 
thirty-three years. His wife, Anna M. 
(Bailey) Hallock, who was the daughter of 
Joseph and Reigne (Hurd) Bailey, became the 




172 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



mother of five children, as follows: Orion J., 
the subject of this sketch; Orson, who died 
when eighteen months- old; Orson, second, 
who died aged five years; Dudley F., who 
died in the army, twenty-six years old; and 
Asahel, who married Sarah Merwin, and has 
two children, respectively named George and 
Edward. The mother died in 1894, aged 
eighty-three. 

Orion J. Hallock commenced to support 
himself at the age of eleven years. He re- 
ceived his education in the district schools, 
and in early manhood adopted agriculture as 
an occupation, which he has since followed 
with success. Being possessed of an unusual 
amount of energy and ability, he found the 
high-road to success at the very start, and has 
followed it with increasing fortune, until he 
gained a position in life seldom reached by 
those depending upon their own individual 
efforts. He has long made the stock busi- 
ness a specialty; and he owns and conducts a 
valuable stock farm, which has a wide reputa- 
tion on account of the extra-fine cattle bred 
there. He owns over one thousand acres 
of land, and is one of the most extensive 
and successful farmers in Litchfield County. 
In politics he is a Democrat, and in 1876 
he represented his town in the State legislat- 
ure. He has also served as Constable and Col- 
lector. 

In March, 1859, Mr. Hallock was united in 
marriage to Caroline L. Austin, daughter of 
Nelson and Clerena (Apley) Austin, of 
Goshen. Mr. and Mrs. Hallock have three 
children, namely: Emma A., who is now the 
wife of Frank E. Cutler, and has one son, 
named Herbert H.; Tinnie E., who is the 
wife of William P. Lawrence, and has one 
son, named William; and Herbert Gay, who 
is at home. Mr. and Mrs. Hallock attend the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 



W' 



ILLIAM H. DAYTON, master 
mechanic of the Excelsior Needle 
Company at Torrington, was born 
here, October 28, 1840. His grandfather, 
Jonah Dayton, a native of Watertown, Conn., 
was for many years a resident of this place, 
having removed when a young man to Dayton- 
ville, which was named in his honor. He 
bought land, and improved a good homestead, 
spending on it the remainder of his threescore 
years and ten. 

Avrid Dayton, father of William H. Day- 
ton, was brought up on a farm, but early 
turned his attention to mechanical pursuits. 
He established a factory at Daytonville for 
the manufacture of melodeons, and was one 
of the leading business men of the place for 
many years. He attained the ripe old age of 
eighty years, enjoying to the utmost the con- 
fidence and esteem of his friends and fellow- 
townsmen. He was twice married. His first 
wife. Miss Bristol in her maidenhood, was a 
native of Litchfield County, born in Litch- 
field or Morris. She bore her husband two 
children: Emily, now deceased; and Will- 
iam H. 

William H. Dayton spent his early years 
in the village of Daytonville, this town, being 
educated in the common schools. He began 
his career as a workman in his father's fac- 
tory. The year after the organization of the 
Excelsior Needle Company by A. F. Migon, 
Mr. Dayton entered the factory in a minor 
position. Since then he has worked his way 
upward, through various ranks, to his present 
responsible office of master mechanic of the 
firm. He is an expert in the use of tools, a 
thorough master of his trade, and has the rep- 
utation of being the finest and most skilful 
mechanic in the vicinity. He is also prom- 
inent in financial affairs and a stockholder in 
this company, which is the largest needle 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



173 



company in the world, carrying on a business 
unequalled by any similar establishment. 

In 1867 Mr. Dayton was joined in the 
bonds of matrimony with Miss Clara Case, a 
daughter of Hosea T. Case, a well-known 
druggist of Torrington. Two children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Dayton, Kate and 
James. Kate, a highly accomplished lady, 
received her early education at St. Margaret's 
School in Waterbury, being afterward a pupil 
at The Elms, in Springfield, Mass. James 
M.,,who had equal educational advantages, 
completed his studies at Hackettstown, N.J. 
In his political views Mr. Dayton is a stanch 
Democrat, upholding the principles of his 
party at all times. He has been a Burgess 
since the formation of the borough, taking a 
prominent part in the management of town 
and county affairs. He attends and supports 
the Episcopal church, of which Mrs. Dayton 
is an esteemed member. 



Wi 



^LLIAM SPITTLE, a first-class ma- 
linist in the employ of the Coe 
Brass Manufacturing Company of 
Torrington, was born in Dudley, England, 
December 7, 1835, son of Samuel and Ann 
(Tipton) Spittle. Samuel Spittle was also a 
native of Dudley, England, where he followed 
with success the trade of a blacksmith. His 
specialty was the manufacture of hand vices, 
in which he continued for many year in Eng- 
land. In September of the year 1848 he 
came to America, locating in New York City, 
where he secured a position as foreman in a 
vice manufactory. There he remained until 
1865, when he removed to the home of his 
son, William Spittle, the subject of this 
Sketch, in Chicopee, Mass. Thenceforward 
he lived with William, coming with him in 
1870 to Torrington, where he died in 1872, 



sixty-three years of age. His wife, Ann (Tip- 
ton) Spittle, was, like himself, a native of 
England ; and their union was blessed by the 
birth of three sons. The two now living are 
William and John. Samuel, Jr., died when 
twenty-three years of age. The mother's 
death also occurred at the home of William 
Spittle, in her sixty-sixth year. 

William Spittle lived with his parents dur- 
ing his youth, and received a good practical 
education in the public schools of England. 
He was thirteen years old when his parents 
brought him to America. At seventeen he 
began to learn the machinist's trade, serving 
an apprenticeship of three years in New Lon- 
don, Conn., after which he had charge of a 
department of the Wilson Manufacturing Com- 
pany up to 1862. The Civil War was then in 
progress, and he entered Company C of the 
Second Connecticut militia as First Lieuten- 
ant of a rifle company of three months' men, 
under the command of Colonel Terry. His 
term of enlistment lasted until the battle of 
Bull Run, when he re-enlisted as Captain of 
Company F of the Twenty-first Connecticut 
Regiment, and thereafter continued to serve 
until the close of the war. He was in many 
of the hard-fought engagements of the Army of 
the Potomac, among which were those of An- 
tietam and Fredericksburg, under General 
Burnside ; the siege of Suffolk, under General 
Peck ; and the attack on Richmond, under 
General Dix. In 1864 he was promoted to 
the rank of Major, and was honorably dis- 
charged in June, 1865. He first returned 
to New London, Conn., but soon after went to 
Chicopee Falls, Mass., where from 1865 to 
1869 he was successfully engaged in the gro- 
cery business. The following year he lived in 
Chicopee, and was there employed by the Gay- 
lord Manufacturing Company. In July, 1870, 
Mr. Spittle came to Torrington, Conn., and 



174 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



took charge of the rivet department of the Coe 
Brass Company. He held that position until 
the department was abolished, since which 
time he has continued as a machinist in the 
company's employment, a connection now cov- 
ering a period of twenty-five years. 

In 1859 Mr. Spittle was joined in marriage 
with Miss Catherine I. Raymond, who was 
born in New London, Conn., daughter of 
Edward Raymond, a captain of a whaling-ves- 
sel. Their union was blessed by the birth of 
three children, of whom two are deceased. 
The survivor is Anna W. ; Katie, who married 
Charles Hubbard, of Torrington, died at 
twenty-eight years of age; and Samuel died 
when three years old. Their mother, whose 
death occurred in her fifty-third year, was a 
member of the Episcopal church. Mr. Spittle 
afterward formed a second marriage with Miss 
Mary L. Tucker, his present wife, who was 
born in Seymour, Conn., and is a daughter of 
David and Angenette (Whitney) Tucker. 
David Tucker was Deputy Sheriff of New 
Haven County for over thirty years, served 
four years as Postmaster under President 
Cleveland, was a member of the Congrega- 
tional church, and died in 1892, sixty-seven 
years of age. Mr.s. Tucker, who was born in 
Litchfield, Conn., is a communicant of the 
Episcopal church, and is still living. She 
reared her husband three children: Mary L., 
now Mrs. Spittle; Jennie A., the wife of 
Joseph H. Jarviss, a machinist; and Henry S. 
Tucker, who is employed by the Coe Brass 
Company. 

In politics Mr. Spittle is now a Republican, 
although previous to the Civil War he was a 
supporter of Democratic principles. He has 
been Constable two years. Justice of the Peace 
ten years, and Trial Justice eight years. He 
was appointed the first Fire Marshal of the 
town, from which position he afterward re- 



signed. As a member of the Knights of Pyth- 
ias he has four times served as Chancellor 
Commander, and thrice as Deputy Grand 
Chancellor; while at the present time he is a 
member of the Committee on Law and Super- 
vision, of the Grand Lodge, and is and has 
been for the past ten years Secretary of the 
Endowment Rank. Mr. Spittle is also con- 
nected with the Order of Red Men, in which 
he has served one term as Chief of Records ; 
and he is a member of Steele Post, Grand 
Army of the Republic, in which he has filled 
the office of Commander for one term and that 
of Quartermaster for eight years. Mr. and 
Mrs. Spittle are both active and influential 
members of the Episcopal church, he serving 
as one of the Vestry and precentor in the Sun- 
day-school, and for fourteen years as member 
of the choir. Mrs. Spittle is a prominent 
member of the King's Daughters, the Ladies' 
Guild, and Ladies' Auxiliary, and is also a 
teacher in the Sunday-school. 



Tj0\ORMAND ADAMS, of whom a brief 
I =/ memoir is here given, supplemented 
J- N^ ^ by a lifelike portrait, was for many 
years a prominent merchant and highly re- 
spected resident of Winsted, Conn. He was 
a son of Matthew Adams, a native of Sims- 
bury, Conn., who moved to the town of Win- 
chester when a comparatively young man, and 
here spent a large part of his life. He mar- 
ried Betsey Case, of Simsbury ; and they reared 
a large family, all of whom are now deceased. 
The last to pass away was Oscar Adams, who 
died at Portage, N.Y., in 1891. The com- 
fortable home of Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Adams 
in Winchester being destroyed by fire, they 
removed to the West, settling in Ohio, where 
they died. Their remains are interred in 
Granville in that State. 




NORMAND ADAMS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



177 



Normand Adams in youth worked on a farm. 
At the age of twenty he came to Winsted, and 
with a partner started in business with a good 
stock of general merchandise, .soon building 
up a flourishing trade. Mr. Adams was also 
President of the Winsted Savings Bank. In 
politics he was an old-time Whig and later a 
Democrat, and as Water Commissioner and in 
other capacities he looked to the best interests 
of the town. He died at his home in Win- 
sted, November 6, 1882, when seventy-five 
years of age, and is survived by his wife, 
Elizabeth Adams, whom he married in 1834, 
when she was seventeen. Mrs. Adams is the 
daughter of Luman and Betsey (Rockwell) 
Wakefield, both natives of Colebrook. Her 
father was for many years a practising physi- 
cian in Winsted, where he settled before his 
marriage. He died here on March 19, 1850? 
in his sixty-third year, his wife having passed 
away in 1833. They had seven children, one 
of whom, a son, died in infancy. Of the others 
the following is a record : Julia became the 
wife of Eli T. Wilder, a lawyer in Red Wing, 
Minn., and died in 1866, when in her fifty- 
second year. Lucy married William H. 
Phelps, founder and President of the Hurlbut 
Bank in Winsted, who died in 1864, she fol- 
lowing him to the better land in 1867, leaving 
a son and daughter. John Luman Wakefield 
was a physician in active practice in Shakopee, 
Minn., where he died in 1874, aged fifty-one, 
leaving four children. James B. Wakefield, 
a retired lawyer, living quietly at Blue Earth 
City, Minn., was in the House of Representa- 
tives at Washington for four years, and has 
been Lieutenant Governor of the State. Mary 
Helen Wakefield became the wife of Richard 
H. Yale, and died in New Orleans in 1851, in 
her thirty-second year. She left a daughter, 
who married Judge John H. Kennard, and is 
now a widow with two daughters and one son, 



residing in Winsted with her aunt, Mrs. 
Adams. 

During her long married life Mrs. Adams 
suffered the most severe losses, the closest ties 
being severed by death. Her first-born child, 
George Gaylord Adams, died suddenly when 
three years old ; and her youngest, James 
Wakefield Adams, passed from her arms when 
but an infant. One son, William Rockwell 
Adams, lived to be twenty-six years old. He 
was a refined and scholarly man, of most ami- 
able character; and when he passed away, in 
May, 1868, the grief of his parents was incon- 
solable. Mrs. Adams is a member of the 
Congregational church, as was her late hus- 
band. Ever since she was married she has 
resided at her present home, 78 Main Street, 
Winsted, which is thus endeared by the asso- 
ciations of nearly sixty years. 




|ISS SARAH A. BISSELL, a re- 
tired school teacher of Litch- 
_ field, was born in Torrington, July 
7, 1825, daughter of George and Sarah (Wood- 
ruff) Bissell. Miss Bissell's grandfather, 
Elisha Bissell, was a native of Windsor, Conn. 
After his marriage he moved to Torrington, 
where he was a lifelong resident and a prosper- 
ous farmer. He raised a family of five chil- 
dren, of whom George Bissell, Miss Bissell's 
father, was the fourth-born. George Bissell 
passed his boyhood at the homestead in Tor- 
rington. He was educated in the district 
schools, and after completing his studies be- 
came a schoolmaster. During the War of 1812 
he went to New London to assist in its de- 
fence, should the English attack it, as antici- 
pated. He died in 1834, aged forty-four 
years, in Torrington. He was a Whig in pol- 
itics, and served as a Selectman, Constable, 
and in other ofifices of [public trust. In Octo- 



178 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ber, 1823, George Bissell married Sarah 
Woodruff, daughter of John and Sally (De- 
Forest) Woodruff. The father, who was born 
in Oxford, Conn., was a prominent farmer of 
Morris, Litchfield County ; but he moved to 
Torrington in 1820, where he passed the re- 
mainder of his life. He served in the Revolu- 
tionary War under General Washington, and 
was with the army during its memorable en- 
campment at Valley Forge. He was made 
prisoner by the British, and confined for a 
time in New York. John Woodruff died at 
the age of seventy-five years. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Sally DeForest, was 
the mother of six children, three sons and 
three daughters. The daughters all lived to 
the advanced age of ninety, and two of the 
sons lived to be eighty years of age. The 
mother, Miss Bissell's maternal grandmother, 
died at the age of sixty-six years. Sarah 
(Woodruff) Bissell became by her first mar- 
riage the mother of two children, namely: 
Sarah A., the subject of this sketch; and 
George D., who now resides in Naugatuck, 
Conn., where he has occupied the position of 
Postmaster, Judge of Probate, Selectman, and 
at present transacts a large amount of public 
business. 

Sarah A. Bissell came to Litchfield in 1836. 
She received her education in the schools of 
that neighborhood. At the age of eighteen 
she commenced her career as an educator. 
She continued to teach in the public schools 
for nearly thirty years, during which time she 
had as pupils many of Litchfield's most promi- 
nent business men of the present day. She 
united with the Congregational church in 
1843, and was actively interested in church 
work until the death of her father. She then 
devoted her entire attention to the care of her 
mother, doing for her comfort all that filial 
affection could prompt, until her death, which 



occurred in September, 1894. Miss Bissell 
has resided at her present home for more than 
fifty years. 

TT^HARLES J. PORTER, the Post- 
I V'^ master and the proprietor of a general 

V,C_^ store in Goshen, was born in this 
town, January 27, 1839, on^Y child of John 
P. and Caroline (Prentiss) Porter. John P. 
Porter, who was the youngest of a family of 
thirteen children, was a native of Farming- 
ton, Conn. When about sixteen years of age, 
he came to Goshen, where he was employed 
for a few 3fears as a clerk. Later on he en- 
gaged in mercantile business for himself. 
He subsequently went to New Haven for a 
short time, after which he returned to Goshen, 
whence he afterward went to West Cornwall. 
He finally settled in Goshen, where his death 
occurred at the age of threescore years and 
ten. He was an active and public-spirited 
man, and served very acceptably as a member 
of the State legislature. His wife was a 
daughter of Walker Prentiss, of Goshen. 
She died at sixty-seven years of age, leaving 
one son, Charles J. Porter. 

Charles J. Porter began his business career 
when but seventeen years of age as a clerk in 
a store. At the opening of the Civil War, 
five years later, he enlisted in the First Con- 
necticut Heavy Artillery. He served three 
years, during which he took part in the 
battles of Petersburg, Fredericksburg, and 
Hanover Court-house. When the war was 
over, he resumed clerking, at which he con- 
tinued for three years. The following two 
years he dealt in horses, and then engaged 
in mercantile business in Goshen with a Mr. 
Cook, under the firm name of Cook & Porter. 
Thirteen years after, he purchased Mr. Cook's 
interest, and conducted the business alone 
for a year. He then sold out, and formed a 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



179 



copartnership with Allen Brothers, under 
the firm name of Porter & Allen Brothers; 
but in the next year he sold his interest, and 
opened the general store which he now owns 
and conducts. 

In 1870 he was joined in marriage with 
Miss Eleanor C. Bennett, a daughter of 
Charles W. Bennett, of Goshen. Their 
union has been blessed by the birth of seven 
children, as follows: John P.; Carrie, the 
wife of A. Barton; Katie, who married L. P. 
Humphrey, of Norfolk, Conn., and has one 
daughter, Hilda; Annie E. ; Charles W. ; 
Samuel W. ; and Gordon B. In his politi- 
cal opinions Mr. Porter is a Republican. In 
1866 and 1893 he served as a Representative 
in the State legislature, and has filled the 
office of Sheriff of Litchfield County. For 
a number of years he has been Town Treas- 
urer of Goshen, and has also served in various 
other offices. In his religious views Mr. 
Porter favors Congregationalism. 



bfRANK STOUGHTON, the present 
P" 5 Representative in the Connecticut 
State legislature for the district of 
Bethlehem, was born in Barkhampsted, April 
I, 1848, son of Cicero and Lavinia (Ange- 
vine) Stoughton. Cicero Stoughton was a 
native of Bloomfield, Conn. He learned the 
tailor's trade in Sharon, and worked there a 
few years, subsequently settling in New Pres- 
ton, where he died at the age of seventy-four. 
His wife, who was a native of Sharon, died 
at the age of sixty-six. They reared five of 
their eight children, namely: Clarissa, wife 
of Arthur D. Catlin, who has one child, 
Clarence F. ; Mary A., wife of Charles 
Meacham, who has four children — Emily, 
Anna, Fred, and Edward; Hattie, wife of 
George M. Hubble; William, who married 



Mary J. Harrison, and has two children — 
Frank and Arthur; and Frank, the subject of 
this sketch. Sarah, John Wolcott, and John 
died young. 

Frank Stoughton was reared in New 
Preston, and enjoyed the advantages of a good 
education, attending district and select 
schools, and finishing his course of study at 
the Gunnery, the school of Washington vil- 
lage. He taught for six seasons, and then 
turned his attention to farming, in which he 
was very successful. He now resides on a 
well-improved farm about two miles west of 
the village of Bethlehem. His judgment in 
agricultural matters is respected throughout 
the community; and he is an influential mem- 
ber of Bethlehem Grange, No. 121. 

On January 13, 1874, he was united in 
marriage with Martha E. Todd, daughter of 
Silvanus M. Todd, of Warren. Mr. and 
Mrs. Stoughton have an adopted son, Will- 
iam F. 

Mr. Stoughton is a stanch Republican, and 
stands high in the estimation of his fellow- 
partisans. He was elected to the State legis- 
lature in 1894. He has held other public 
offices, acting as Selectman of Bethlehem for 
some time and serving on the Grand Jury. 
He is a member of Watertown Lodge, No. 
69, Ancient Order of United Workmen. In 
religious belief Mr. Stoughton is a Congre- 
gationalist, his wife also belonging to that 
church. 



M 



WIGHT S. CASE, superintendent 
of the Gilbert Home at Winsted, has 
held that position since the home 
was established, having accepted the office at 
the solicitation of the founder, William S. 
Gilbert. This beautiful home for friendless 
children is one of the grandest institutions 
of the State. It is endowed with a fund of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



four hundred thousand dollars. The property 
contains twenty-five acres of well-graded land, 
on which is erected the home, a fine brick 
structure, four stories in height, and one hun- 
dred and ninety-six by sixty feet in dimen- 
sion. There are now one hundred and .fifty- 
seven children within its walls, nine adults, 
and three teachers, besides Mr. and Mrs. 
Case. Mr. Case is admirably fitted for the 
duties of his position, being kind and sympa- 
thetic, yet firm, and has the hearty support 
and co-operation of the trustees. These trus- 
tees, in whom the property and general gov- 
ernment of the institution are vested, are: 
R. E. Holmes, I. B. Woodruff, George B. 
Owen, Lyman R. Norton, Charles B. Hallett, 
A. H. Fenn, David Strong, Eugene Potter, 
Harvey L. Roberts, W. J. Garvin, J. H. 
Norton, William L. Camp, and C. J. York. 
Harvey B. Steele and Theophilus Baird, re- 
cently deceased, were formerly members of the 
board. This home, founded by the generosity 
of Mr. Gilbert, has long been needed, and is 
heartily indorsed by the State Board of Char- 
ities. 

Mr. Case was born in Hartland, February 
23, 1843, a son of the late Horace Case and 
a grandson of Obed Case, who was a native 
of Granby, this State. Obed Case was a 
farmer by occupation, and reared a family of 
eight children, comprising an equal number of 
sons and of daughters, one of whom, Luna, 
the widow of Milton Case, is still living. 
The grandfather lived to a ripe old age, dying 
in 1850, more than fourscore years of age. 
Horace Case was born in Barkhamsted, this 
county, in 1809, and died in the same town 
in 1 891. The maiden name of his wife, to 
whom he was united in 1840, was Louisa 
Blakeslee, a native of Hartland, Hartford 
County, where the first few years of their 
wedded life were spent. In 1846 they re- 



moved to Barkhamsted, settling on a home- 
stead of one hundred and seventy-five acres, 
from which they improved a good farm, still re- 
tained in the family. Their family consisted 
of four sons, as follows: Clayton H., a jew- 
eller, who lives in Hartford; Dwight S., sub- 
ject of this sketch; Frank A., a merchant, 
living in New Hartford, who is prominent in 
public affairs, and has served two terms in 
the legislature; and Herbert B., a farmer, re- 
siding in Barkhamsted, who has been Town 
Clerk, Town Treasurer, and Postmaster for 
many years. Of Herbert B. it may be further 
said that he is keen, quick-witted, and pos- 
sessed of good legal ability, that he has been 
the administrator of several large estates and 
Representative of his district in the State 
legislature. The mother died in April, 1864, 
in the forty-fifth year of her age. The father 
was again married, this time to Sarah E. Mer- 
rill, who survives him. 

Dwight S. Case received a thorough educa- 
tion in the branches taught in the common 
schools, and took a business course at the 
Hartford Commercial College. He remained 
on the home farm until, about thirty years of 
age, after which he was successfully engaged 
in a mercantile business in Barkhamsted for 
seventeen years. In 1888 he was selected by 
Mr. Gilbert to fill his present onerous posi- 
tion, and in the discharge of his duties he has 
ever evinced the utmost fidelity and ability. 
He has served the public as Constable, Town 
Clerk, Assessor, Registrar, Grand Juror, and 
Postmaster for several years; and in 1872 he 
was a member of the State legislature. He 
and his brothers, following in their honored 
father's footsteps, are Chapter Masons. 

On attaining his majority, in 1864, Mr. 
Case was united in marriage with Ellen M. 
Sheldon, of Barkhamsted, a daughter of David 
H. and Charlana (Cady) Sheldon, both now 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon reared four 
children, one of whom, Cady Sheldon, died 
in middle life, leaving a widow. Another, 
D. E. Sheldon, is a merchant in Kansas. 
A third, A. D. Sheldon, residing in Chehalis, 
Lewis County, Wash., is manager of the 
Water Company. The union of Mr. and Mrs. 
Case has been blessed by the birth of three 
children, namely: Frank D., an unmarried 
man, who has recently returned from Cali- 
fornia; Archer M., a young man of nineteen 
years; and Harold S., an active boy of thir- 
teen years. Both parents are consistent mem- 
bers of the Congregational church. 



'OHN Q. AMES, a prosperous farmer 
of Litchfield and a veteran of the Civil 
War, was born in South Farms, now 
called Morris, October 3, 1845, son of Rufus 
and Mary (Westover) Ames. Mr. Ames's 
father, who was a native of Canada, was 
reared to agricultural life, and in early man- 
hood came to the United States, first settling 
in Goshen, Conn. He later purchased a farm 
in Morris, which he cultivated successfully, 
and became a well-to-do farmer. He died at 
the age of fifty-six years. His wife, who was 
a native of Morris, became the mother of nine 
children, seven of whom are still living, and 
are as follows: David, a resident of Bethle- 
hem; Mary, wife of Walter Turner, of Salis- 
bury; Ann, wife of Hiram Bishop, of Water- 
town ; James, a resident of Bethlehem ; Lucy, 
wife of Walcott Bunnell ; John Q., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; and Hattie. The mother, 
who was a member of the Episcopal church, 
passed her declining years in Morris, where 
she died. 

John Q. Ames, left an orphan at the age of 
ten years, then began to support himself. He 
worked as a farm laborer by the year, attend- 



ing school during the winter, being obliged 
to pay for his tuition from his earnings. 
At the age of seventeen he enlisted as a pri- 
vate in Company A, Nineteenth Connecticut 
Volunteer Infantry, which served under Gen- 
eral Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. He 
participated in the battles of Winchester, 
Cedar Creek, the siege and capture of Peters- 
burg, and the capture of Richmond, and was 
present at the surrender of General Lee at 
Appomattox. He received his discharge in 
New Haven after serving one year, the most 
important and decisive period of the CivU 
War. He was for the next eight years em- 
ployed in the cutlery manufactory of Salis- 
bury. Failing health caused him to relin- 
quish that business, and for the succeeding 
five years he followed the trade of a carpenter. 
He was next manager for five years of the 
large property occupied by Dr. Allen, of New 
York City, as a summer residence. This posi- 
tion he resigned to take charge of George E. 
Jones's stock farm at Lakeside Park. After 
remaining there for two years he retired to 
his farm of seventy-five acres, situated on 
Beach Street, which he had previously 
bought, and where he has since resided. 

Mr. Ames is independent in politics. He 
is a comrade of the Grand Army of the Re- 
public, and has been Commander of his Post, 
besides holding other offices. He was a mem- 
ber of the Good Templars of Salisbury, and 
was for two years Chief Templar of the 
Lodge. He is a member of the Grange, of 
which he was Master for two years, and has 
been Overseer of the County Grange. 

In 1867 Mr. Ames was united in marriage 
to Lydia A. Stone, who was born in Salis- 
bury, daughter of David Stone, a truckman 
of that town. Mr. and Mrs. Ames are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. He 
has been officially connected with the church 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in Litchfield as Steward, and was superin- 
tendent of the Sabbath-school for two years. 



-OHN H. WOOD, of Thomaston, 
Litchfield County, Conn., formerly 
superintendent of the movement de- 
partment of the Seth Thomas Clock Company, 
with which he was associated for about forty- 
four years, is a man of superior mechanical 
ability. He was born in Plymouth, Conn., 
on June 30, 1828, and is a son of Henry and 
Julia (Ford) Wood, the former of whom was 
born in East Windsor, Conn. 

James Wood, father of Henry, was one of 
three brothers, who came from England, and 
settled in East Windsor, Conn., where they 
spent the remainder of their lives in the suc- 
cessful pursuit of agriculture. He married 
Miss Susan Elmer, and they became the 
parents of six children; but all have since 
passed away. His nephew, John Warner 
Barber, wrote the History of Connecticut pub- 
lished in 1836, the first history ever written 
of that State. 

Henry Wood spent his early years on a 
farm in Windsor. He acquired a good practi- 
cal education in the schools of that town, and 
was afterward for a long period engaged in 
school teaching. After his marriage he re- 
moved to Plymouth, and the remainder of his 
life was spent in that town. He died there 
at sixty years of age. His wife, Julia Ford, 
was a daughter of Hial and Lucina (Pres- 
ton) Ford, of Plymouth, a grand-daughter of 
Amos F"ord, a great-grand-daughter of Eben- 
ezer Ford, and a great-great-grand-daughter of 
Barnabas Ford, who was one of the earliest 
settlers in what is now the town of Thomas- 
ton, Conn., which then bore the name of 
Northbury. Down to Amos Ford these an- 
cestors spent their lives in that town, where 



they engaged in agricultural pursuits. He 
sold his property there, and removed to Ver- 
mont, where he lived during the rest of his 
life. Mrs. Henry Wood's maternal ancestors 
were large land-owners in Harwinton, Conn. 
Her mother, Lucina (Preston) Ford, was 
a sister of Stiles Preston; and both were 
children of John Preston, whose wife was a 
daughter of Deacon Reuben and Edna (Stiles) 
Preston, the latter of whom was a daughter of 
President Stiles, of Yale College. Hial 
Ford and his wife reared a family of eight 
children, namely: Lucina (deceased); Susan 
(deceased); John; Allen, who resides in Meri- 
den. Conn. ; Warren, a resident of Thomas- 
ton ; Julia, who is dead; Harriet, who mar- 
ried Charles Hurlburt, of Thomaston; and 
Wealthy (deceased). 

John H. Wood remained with his parents 
until he was twelve years of age. He then 
went to work on a farm, and followed that oc- 
cupation until he was fifteen years old. His 
father gave him his wages during the re- 
mainder of his minority. He soon began to 
learn the trade of a movement-maker on 
clocks and watches; and, after serving an ap- 
prenticeship of three years, he was employed 
a year as a journeyman. In 1848 he secured 
a position with the Seth Thomas Clock Com- 
pany as a mechanic, shortly becoming a con- 
tractor and later a foreman. He was finally 
made superintendent of their movement fac- 
tory, a position that he held for thirty years, 
and from which he resigned in 1892, since 
which time he has lived in retirement, hav- 
ing laid by sufficient to enable him to do so 
in comfort. • When the Thomaston Knife 
Company was formed, he was chosen its 
President, and still holds that position. 

In 1849 he was united in marriage with 
Miss Mary Ostrom, a daughter of Henry 
Ostrom, a woollen operator and one of the 




JOHN H. WOOD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'8S 



pioneer settlers of Torrington, Conn. She 
bore her husband two children, a son and a 
daughter, Eliza and Henry O. Eliza Wood 
married O. B. Sawyer, who was a Lieutenant 
in Company A of the Fourteenth Regiment 
of Connecticut Volunteers. She died on Feb- 
ruary 17, 1872, and he on November 16, 
1874. Three children were born of their 
union: a daughter, who died in childhood; 
and two sons, Frederick H. and Wilbur John, 
both of whom were graduated from the 
Thomaston High School in 1887, their class 
being the first to receive diplomas from that 
school. In 1890 they entered the class of 
1894 at Wesleyan University in Middletown, 
Conn., and would have graduated together, but 
Wilbur J. was taken sick, and died on March 
3, 1894. Frederick H. completed the course 
with his class, and is now attending the Bos- 
ton University, where he is taking a course 
in theology. Henry O. Wood was for a num- 
ber of years a book-keeper for the Seth 
Thomas Clock Company, but is now superin- 
tendent of the Waterbury Brass Company at 
Waterbury, Conn. He is a prominent Odd 
Fellow. ' 

In politics Mr. Wood is a Republican, and 
has supported that party ever since its forma- 
tion. He was sent as a Representative from 
his town to the legislature of 1887, and has 
served as grand juror and in other offices. 
For several years he was a member of the 
School Committee. When elected to the leg- 
islature, he had a clear majority over three 
candidates, and during his term of office was 
appointed by the Speaker as one of the Com- 
mittee on Banks, He was one of the incorpo- 
rators of the Thomaston Savings Bank, and 
at the present time is the President of that 
institution. His wife is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is a 
liberal supporter. He was chairman of the 



building committee, and has acted as Trustee 
for over thirty years. 

A portrait of this useful, influential, and 
highly respected citizen appears on a neigh- 
boring page. 

7J7\HARLES A. SANFORD, M.D., 
C S[ a practising physician of Falls Vil- 
V,;2_^ lage, was born in Cornwall, Janu- 
ary I, 1868, son of Dr. Edward and Vilate C. 
(Gardner) Sanford. Dr. Sanford's grand- 
father, Amos Sanford, was a resident of 
Cornwall, where he followed the trade of a 
clock-maker. He died at the age of seventy- 
two years. His five children were: Alson, 
Edward, Buell, Nancy, and Caroline. 

Edward Sanford, M.D., Dr. Sanford's 
father, was born in Cornwall. He attended 
the New York Medical College, and after 
completing his studies located in Cornwall, 
where he practised his profession for forty- 
two years. He was a well-known and highly 
esteemed physician. He became prominent 
in public affairs, serving in important town 
offices. He was a member of the Connecticut 
House of Representatives for two terms. Dr. 
Edward Sanford died in Cornwall at the 
age of sixty -four years. His wife, who was 
daughter of James M. Gardner, became the 
mother of four children, as follows: Henry 
E.; Josephine E., who is now Mrs. Smith; 
Charles A., the subject of this sketch; and 
Jennie G., who is now Mrs. Preston. The 
mother still survives. 

Charles A. Sanford commenced his educa 
tion in the public schools of Cornwall. After 
pursuing a course at the Housatonic Valley 
Institute, he entered upon the study of medi- 
cine, graduating from the Long Island Col- 
lege Hospital, March 21, 1894. On May i, 
1894, he commenced the practice of his pro- 
fession in Falls Village, Dr. Sanford is a 



r86 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



member of the State and County Medical So- 
cieties and of the Alumni Association of the 
Long Island Hospital. 



"I'^iypjARK S. NICKERSON, a promi- 
p= I =/ nent farmer of New Hartford, a 
^4 ajjs ^^^^ member of the Board of Selectmen 
and a veteran of the Civil War, was born in 
Cornwall, Litchfield County, May i6, 1843, 
son of Smith and Mary A. (Davidson^ Nicker- 
son. Mr. Nickerson's father was born in 
Sharon, Conn., in 1804; and his grandfather 
was an early settler in that town. Smith 
Nickerson was a farmer, and he followed that 
occupation through life. In 1842 he settled 
in Cornwall, where he was prominent among 
the agricultural community for some years. 
He finally purchased a farm in Torrington, 
and on it passed the last years of his life. 
He died there in 1852, aged forty-eight years. 
His first wife, Mary A. Davidson, who was a 
native of Cornwall, became the mother of 
eight children, five of whom are living, 
namely: Sarah, Uriah, Almira, Henry, and 
Mark S. Sarah is the widow of the late 
Sergeant. Hall; Almira is the widow of the 
late Edwin Fitch; and Henry resides in Corn- 
wall. Four of her sons served in the army 
during the Civil War; and Edwin Nickerson, 
of the Thirteenth Regiment, Connecticut 
Volunteers, was killed at the battle of Irish 
Bend. The mother died in Cornwall, aged 
forty years. Mr. Nickerson's parents were 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mark S. Nickerson was left an orphan at 
the age of nine years. He resided with his 
step-mother for a time, and later went to live 
with an aunt, with whom he remained until 
her death. He received a common-school 
education, and worked upon a farm until he 
reached the age of nineteen, when he en- 



listed as a private in Company A, Tenth 
Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. 
He served three years in the Civil War, in- 
cluding the most important period of the Re- 
bellion; and he was with the Army of the 
Potomac throughout the Peninsular campaign. 
At the expiration of his first term of enlist- 
ment he re-enlisted in the Thirteenth New 
York Cavalry, with which he served until 
mustered out at the close of the war. He 
participated in sixteen decisive battles, being 
a portion of the time attached to the Color 
Guard; and, although death often stared him 
in the face, and many of his comrades fell 
around him never to rise again, he escaped 
without an injury. He was promoted to the 
rank of Corporal in each regiment to which 
he belonged, and he received each of his dis- 
charges as such. After his final discharge 
he returned to Cornwall, and worked as a 
farmer for a time. He then went to his 
sister in Chicago, and attended a commercial 
college. Once more he returned to Cornwall, 
and for six years was engaged in teaching 
school in West Cornwall and Canaan, while 
residing in Cornwall village. In 1892 he 
settled upon his present farm in Nepaug. 
The property, which contains a fine brick res- 
idence, is pleasantly located, and comprises 
sixty-five acres of fertile land. Mr. Nicker- 
son devotes his time and energies to general 
farming, with the most satisfactory results, 
paying particular attention to the raising of 
poultry. In politics he is a Democrat; and, 
although his well-known intelligence and 
energy make him especially eligible to pub- 
lic office, he has declined nominations on va- 
rious occasions. He was for several years a 
member and Secretary of the School Board in 
Cornwall, and has acted as a Justice of the 
Peace for many years. He had been a resi- 
dent of New Hartford but one year when he 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



187 



was elected to the Board of Selectmen, in 
which position he has since served with 
ability. 

On April 26, 1875, Mr. Nickerson was 
married to Hannah A. Higgins, daughter of 
Upton Higgins, of Wolcott, New Haven 
County, and has one. daughter, May A. Mr. 
Nickerson has for several years been con- 
nected with church work. He was united 
with the Congregational church in Cornwall, 
and was superintendent of the Sunday-school 
there for some time. Since coming to New 
Hartford he has joined the Congregational 
church in Nepaug, and is superintendent of 
its Sunday-school. Mrs. Nickerson is a 
member of the same church, and both are in 
the Young People's Society for Christian 
Endeavor. 

Many amiable qualities endear Mr. and 
Mrs. Nickerson to their numerous friends. 
They are interesting and hospitable, and so- 
cially are very popular. 



/^STeORGE H. CLARK, an enterpris- 
\ i) I ing merchant of Salisbury, was born 
in that town, April 2, 1851, and is a 
son of George B. and Betsey A. (Hamlin) 
Clark. His paternal grandfather was Nehe- 
miah Clark, who came to Salisbury from East- 
ern Connecticut, and followed the combined 
occupations of miller and farmer in this 
town. He was the father of six children: 
Delia, Nathaniel, George B., Harry, Mary, 
and Sarah. 

George B. Clark, who was born in Salis- 
bury, adopted agriculture as his life occupa- 
tion, and became a prosperous farmer. He 
died at the age of seventy-eight years. His 
wife, Betsey A. Hamlin, was a daughter of 
Benjamin Hamlin, of Sharon, Conn. She 
was the mother of two children: George H., 



whose name appears at the head of this 
sketch ; and Ambrose R. She died in the 
full bloom of womanhood, aged twenty-nine 
years. 

George H. Clark was educated in the 
schools of his native town, and resided at 
home until reaching the age of twenty-one. 
He then engaged in mercantile business in 
Salisbury in company with his brother, Am- 
brose R. At the end of one year he pur- 
chased his brother's interest in the store, and 
has since conducted it alone. Having gradu- 
ally secured a large and profitable trade in 
the grocery line, in 1890 he added a dry- 
goods department, in which he has been 
equally successful. He takes an interest in 
and has been closely identified with public 
affairs for many years. He has served as 
Town Clerk and Treasurer, and represented 
his town in the legislature during the years 
1879, 1891, and 1893. Mr. Clark married 
Mary E. Ball, a daughter of R. H. Ball, a 
well-known citizen of Salisbury. 



/^^TeORGE R. woodward, a thrifty 
V i) I farmer and substantial citizen of 
Sharon, was born within the con- 
fines of that town, July 9, 181 3, and is 
therefore one of the oldest and best-known 
residents of that community. He is a son of 
Abel, Jr., and Susan (Woodruff) Woodward. 

Abel Woodward, Sr., grandfather of 
George R., was a native of Lebanon, Conn. 
The major part of his life was, however, spent 
in Watertown, Conn., where he followed the 
occupation of farmer. He died December 
31, 1820, eighty-five years of age. He mar- 
ried Miss Lucy Atwood, of Woodbury, Conn. 
The ages of both were about the same; but 
Mrs. Woodward outlived her husband until 
January 16, 1823, when she died, in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



eighty-eighth year of her age. They were the 
parents of nine children; namely, Reuben S., 
Eunice, Abel, James, David, Lucy, John, Je- 
rusha, and Russell. Abel Woodward, Jr., 
was born in Watertown, Mass., October 13, 
1770. In the early part of his life he was en- 
gaged in mercantile business; but in 1797 he 
settled on a farm in Sharon, and spent the 
later years of his life in the occupation of an 
agriculturist. His wife was a daughter of 
David and Esther Woodruff, of Oxford, Conn. 
He died in 1849, seventy-nine years of age; 
and her death occurred three years later, when 
she was seventy-seven years old. They reared 
a family of eight children, of whom George 
R. is the sole survivor. The rest were: 
Laura, Nancy, David, Susan, Ruth E., Abel 
C, Louise L. 

George R. Woodward, the youngest child, 
received his education in the district schools 
of Sharon and from the instruction of private 
teachers. At first he -taught school, begin- 
•ning at nine dollars per month; but, after 
following that occupation for four seasons, he 
purchased in 1844 the farm on which he now 
resides, having lived there since 1845. It is 
located a mile and a half south of Sharon vil- 
lage; and, increased by a later purchase of 
fifty acres, it now contains two hundred and 
ten acres. 

In 1839 he was joined in marriage with 
Miss Sarah Boland, a daughter of Reuben and 
Abigail Boland, of Sharon. Four daugh- 
ters were the fruit of their union, as follows: 
Susan W., who married Nathan H. Jewett, 
and at her death left five children — Carrie, 
Sarah, Fannie, Abbie, and Mary; Abbie F., 
wife of Samuel A. Skiff, who was the mother 
of eight children, all now deceased —namely, 
George, Sarah, Abbie, Lillie, Gertrude, 
Susan, Florence, and Warren; Emma M., 
wife of Luther Brown; and Harriet V., who 



died aged seventeen mqnths. The Repub- 
lican party has always counted Mr. Woodward 
among its most faithful adherents. During 
several terms he has served his town very ac- 
ceptably as Selectman. His wife is an hon- 
ored member of the Congregational church of 
Sharon. 




pjUELL HEMINWAY, a silk manu- 
^^ facturer of Watertown, Conn., son 
of General Merrit and Mary A. 
(Buell) Heminway, was born in this town, 
April 20, 1838. He acquired a good education 
in the common schools and Watertown Acad- 
emy, and at an early age went to work in his 
father's silk manufactory. Having become thor- 
oughly familiar with all branches of the busi- 
ness, he finally entered into partnership with 
his father, the business then being transacted 
under the firm name of M. Heminway & Sons. 
When General Heminway died, Mr. Buell 
Heminway, together with his son Havens and 
Mr. Bartlett, the superintendent under the old 
firm, organized a stock company to carry on 
the business, which continues to be one of the 
largest industries in the county. Mr. Hemin- 
way is a Director of the Dime Savings Bank in 
Waterbury, a member of the building commit- 
tee of the new town hall, chairman of the 
executive committee of the library, and Treas- 
urer of the Centre School District. When 
the new library building was erected, he was a 
member of the committee in charge of it, and 
took an active interest in the completion of 
the edifice, which is one of the handsomest 
public buildings in the State. He has inher- 
ited many of his father's characteristics, is 
courteous, kindly, and public-spirited, ready to 
aid in all projects for the improvement of his 
native town and the good of the people in gen- 
eral, and responding readily to all demands 
upon his time and attention or his purse. 




/i^-.,-^.-^^ Ji^ 



^KJ-^w-T^--^^/ 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



In January, 1866, Mr. Heminway married 
Julia, only daughter of George F. Havens, a 
lawyer of New York City. Three children 
have blessed their union, namely : Buell 
Havens, who is in business with his father; 
and Mary J. and Helen L. , who are living 
with their parents. The son is married and 
has two children. 

In politics Mr. Heminway is a Democrat. 
He is a Vestryman of the Episcopal church, of 
which all his family are members. His wife 
and daughters are active in religious work, 
teaching in the Sunday-school and zealously 
forwarding the interests of the parish. The 
name of Heminway is identified with all char- 
itable enterprises; and the family is univer- 
sally esteemed, beloved by the poor, and re- 
spected by people of their own station in life. 
An excellent portrait of Mr. Heminway, a 
fine steel engraving, will be seen on a neigh- 
boring page of this volume. 



SVANOE LYMAN, a leading citizen of 
Falls Village, Salisbury, was born in 
Bridgeport, Conn., May 13, 1856, son 
of Samuel and Sarah (Squires) Lyman. Sam- 
uel Lyman, who was born in Washington, 
Mass., was a locomotive engineer on the 
Housatonic Railroad. He died while a com- 
paratively young man, passing away at the 
age of thirty-eight. His wife was a daugh- 
ter of Sullivan Squires. Her life, too, was 
shorter than the average, embracing but fifty 
years. They reared three children: Ivanoe, 
Minott, and Florence. The latter died some 
time since. 

Ivanoe Lyman received a fair education in 
the -public schools. Leaving his books at the 
age of sixteen, he went to work in the car shops 
of Falls Village. There he remained several 
years, becoming thoroughly acquainted with 




the work of locomotive building. He subse- 
quently spent three and a half years in Bridge- 
port. Eventually, he returned to the Falls 
Village shops, and since 1893 he has been 
general manager of the motive power estab- 
lishment. Mr. Lyman has natural mechani- 
cal ability. This, supplemented by business 
tact and good judgment, has made him a very 
efficient manager, the duties of which office 
he performs in a manner satisfactory to all 
concerned. In politics he is a Republican. 
He is advanced in Masonry, belonging to 
Montgomery Lodge, No. 13, A. F. & A. M., 
Lakeville Chapter, No. 43, and the Royal 
Arch. 

LONZO B. GARFIELD, a general 
merchant of East Canaan, was born 
in Summerville, Pa., December 12, 
1837, son of Abner P. and Emily (Bullard) 
Garfield. Mr. Garfield's grandfather, Elisha 
Garfield, was a native of Massachusetts. He 
was prominent in his locality, and served his 
town faithfully in public office. He was 
Town Clerk for thirty years, and represented 
his district in the Massachusetts legislature 
for several terms. His children were: 
Abiram, Polly, Abner P., and Elisha. 

Abner P. Garfield, father of Alonzo B., was 
born in Tyringham, Mass. He was trained 
to agriculture, and followed farming with 
prosperous results until his death, which oc- 
curred at the age of sixty-three years. His 
wife, Emily Bullard, was a daughter of Ben- 
jamin Bullard, of Tyringham. She became 
the mother of five children ; namely, Levi, 
Maria A., Elisha, Alonzo B., and Daniel. 
She died at the age of eighty-one years. 

Alonzo B. Garfield commenced his educa- 
tion in the district schools, and after a course 
at the Charlotteville Seminary completed his 
studies at the Claverack Academy in New 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



York. He taught school for seven winters, 
his summers being devoted to farming. Sub- 
sequently he entered mercantile business as a 
clerk in Monterey, Mass., where he remained 
for ten years. He then removed from Mon- 
terey to East Canaan, where he purchased a 
general store, and now enjoys a flourishing 
business. For the first four years he was as- 
sociated with a partner; but at the expiration 
of that time he bought his partner's interest, 
and has since continued in business alone. 
He carries a large and varied stock of general 
merchandise, and enjoys the esteem and con- 
fidence of his patrons. Mr. Garfield acted as 
Town Clerk in Monterey for some years, and 
for four years has been a member of the Board 
of Selectmen of Canaan. 

In 1 870 Mr. Garfield was united in mar- 
riage with Mrs. Ella Webster Jewell, widow 
of John Jewell and daughter of Eugene Web- 
ster, of Canaan. They have three children; 
namely, Hattie E., James A., and Irene E. 




I D WARD H. WELCH, M.D., one of 
the leading physicians and surgeons of 
Winsted, was born March 15, 1852, 
in the house, 386 Main Street, which is now 
his residence. He comes of a family of 
doctors, both sides being represented in medi- 
cine. His grandfather, Dr. Benjamin Welch, 
who was born in 1772, married Louisa, daugh- 
ter of Dr. Ephraim Guiteau; and they reared 
a family of five sons and three daughters. All 
the sons became physicians, and located as 
follows: Benjamin, Jr., at Lakeville; Asa 
in Lee, Mass. ; James, father of the subject of 
this sketch, in Winsted; William W. at Nor- 
folk; John, successively in Litchfield, Nor- 
folk, and Hartford. Dr. Benjamin Welch 
was an eminent surgeon and the manufacturer 
of the Welch splints. Dr. Asa Welch was 



State Senator. Dr. William Welch was ac- 
tive in politics, represented Norfolk in the 
State legislature and the district in Congress. 
He died in Norfolk in July, 1892. 

Dr. James Welch, born in Norfolk, Conn., 
January 12, 1807, was in active practice for 
fifty-three years in Winsted, where he estab- 
lished his home, building the house in which 
his son. Dr. Edward H. Welch, now resides. 
He lived to be nearly eighty years old, dying 
in November, 1886. He was married in 1836 
to Miss Lavinia Hubbard, who, born in Salis- 
bury, Conn., in July, 1806, died in January, 
1882, at the age of seventy-six years. They 
reared a family of six children. 

Dr. Edward H. Welch was a student at 
Winchester Institute, and studied medicine 
with his father, taking charge of his first case 
of obstetrics in March, 1870, before he was 
eighteen years old. He was out of college 
for two years on account of his father's ill 
health; but he graduated from Yale in 1876, 
taking his degree of M.D. in the same year. 
For upward of twenty years Dr. Welch has 
been kept busy by the cares incident to the 
life of a physician, answering cheerfully the 
call for help from suffering humanity, whether 
it came in the day or the night. He has, 
however, found time to attend to social 
matters also, and to take an interest in poli- 
tics. He is a stalwart Republican, but as yet 
has held no office. He is Post Surgeon of 
Litchfield County, is President of the Yale 
Alumni Association, belongs to the Winsted 
Lodge of Red Men, and is a member of the 
A. F. & A., M. 

Dr. Welch was married in September, 
1876, to Nellie, daughter of Nathan and 
Jennie (Wing) Munger, of New York City. 
Miss Munger came to Winsted with her 
grandfather, John Wing, and was here edu- 
cated at Miss Phillips's School for young 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



193 



ladies. Dr. and Mrs. Welch have lost an in- 
fant son, and have one daughter, Louise, a 
bright little miss of fourteen, who attends 
school at Winsted. 



tUGUSTUS MESSENGER PER- 
KINS, a respected and prominent 
^_^, agriculturist, was born in Becket, 
Berkshire County, Mass., May 9, 1817, on 
the homestead of his father, Origen Augustus 
Perkins. Origen Augustus was born in the 
same house, March 31, 1785, a son of Ephraim 
Perkins, who was a native of Hanover Parish, 
Lisbon, Conn., born July 8, 1745. The 
Perkins family originated in England. Its 
first progenitor in this country was one John 
Perkins, born in Newent, Gloucestershire, 
England, in 1590, who on December i, 1630, 
sailed for America, and landed at Nantasket, 
Mass., in the following February. The line 
of descent is continued through his son Jacob, 
the next in line being Joseph, then Matthew, 
whose son Ephraim was the paternal grand- 
father of the subject of this article. (A more 
detailed account of the family will be found 
in a work compiled by George A. Perkins, of 
Salem, Mass., published in 1889.) 

In 1736 the legislature of Massachusetts 
sold to Matthew Perkins, of Lisbon, Conn., 
and thirty-four others a large tract of land, 
embracing several towns in the southern part 
of Berkshire County. Subsequently Matthew 
Perkins gave to his son, Ephraim Perkins, 
fourteen hundred acres of this land, located in 
the town of Becket. When twenty-three years 
of age, Ephraim visited that place, and 
erected a commodious frame house, which is 
to-day one of the finest in that vicinity, 
having withstood the ravages of time and 
weather for more than one hundred and 
twenty-five years. He went back to Connecti- 



cut after doing this, married Mary Chaplin in 
November, 1771, and the following day, ac- 
companied by his fair bride, started on horse- 
back for their future home in Becket. Here 
they resided until called to join the silent 
majority; and their pleasant homestead, now 
known by the name "Bonny Rigg," is in the 
possession of their grandsons, William and 
Alfred Birney, of Springfield, Mass. 

Origen Augustus Perkins completed a 
course of study at Lenox Academy after he 
left the district school. He inherited a por- 
tion of the home farm, and bought the interest 
of his brothers and sisters in the remainder. 
He lived on the homestead throughout his 
entire life, and died there in 1854. His 
wife, in maidenhood Sarah Messenger, like- 
wise spent her entire life in the town of 
Becket, living to the advanced age of seventy- 
seven years. She was the grand-daughter of 
Benoni Messenger, who married Lucy Wood, 
and afterward became one of the first settlers 
in Becket, where he kept a public house for 
many years. Her father, Hiram Messenger, 
in addition to carrying on general agriculture 
on his fine farm, about four miles north of 
Becket Centre, was also proprietor of a hotel, 
and operated a saw and grist mill. He mar- 
ried Lydia Shapleigh; and in 1815 they re- 
moved to Western New York, going thence, 
some three years later, to Amherst, Lorain 
County, Ohio, to spend their remaining days. 
Origen A. Perkins and his wife reared three 
children; namely, Augustus M., Charles O., 
and Sarah L. Charles O., who lived on the 
old home farm until 1874, went to Kansas for 
a few years, returned to Becket for a while, 
and was at Thomasville, Ga., whither he had 
gone to escape the chilly winds of our North- 
ern winters, when he died. Sarah L. was the 
first wife of the late William Birney, of 
Springfield, Mass. . 



194 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Augustus M. Perkins received an academi- 
cal education at Lenox and Westfield. He 
selected agriculture as his occupation, and 
bought a farm adjoining the old homestead. 
In addition to cultivating the land he engaged 
in the lumber business on a rather extensive 
scale. For this business he bought large 
tracts of timber lands, of which on June i, 
1863, he had as much as thirty-six hundred 
acres, one hundred and thirty acres being in 
Connecticut and the remainder in Berkshire 
County, Massachusetts. At one period he had 
three steam saw-mills in operation at the same 
time. In February, 1865, he settled on the 
estate he now occupies, situated about a mile 
from the village of Winsted. Soon after 
coming here he bought a large tract of forest 
land in Barkhamsted ; and, taking advantage 
of the fine water-power thereon, he erected a 
large saw-mill, and manufactured lumber. 
He subsequently purchased the Greenwood 
Trotting Park, located in the heart of Win- 
sted; and, platting about three-fourths of it, 
he sold it by lots at a good profit. He has 
always been noted for his enterprise and su- 
perior business qualifications. He is also 
generously endowed with public spirit, being 
willing to aid every project conducive to the 
advancement and welfare of the community. 
He is a strong member of the Republican 
party, having joined its ranks at its start. 
He was Postmaster in Becket, and here he 
has been Assessor and Magistrate. 

Mr. Perkins wedded, November 8, 1838, 
Ruth S. Snow, who was born in Becket, No- 
vember 30, 1 814, being a daughter of Timothy 
and Ruth (Wadsworth) Snow. The union of 
Mr. and Mrs. Perkins has been blessed by the 
birth of eight children; namely, Ephraim A., 
Roger M., Timothy W., Benjamin C, Susan 
S., Sarah L., Bishop, and Mary. Mr. Per- 
kins is an extensive reader of the best litera- 



ture of the period, and is well informed on 
all the current topics. He has one of the 
best-stocked libraries in the town, among his 
books being many valuable works, some of 
which are now out of print. In his house are 
many articles valuable for their antiquity and 
their associations. One is a watch made to 
order in England for his great-grandfather. 
Another is a chair formerly owned by his 
paternal grandmother, Mary Chaplin. The 
chair is of cherry wood; and the seat, which 
was upholstered by her, bears her name and the 
date, 1770, in embroidery. Mr. Perkins often 
gives expression to his thoughts in verse, and 
has won considerable reputation as a poet. 



^OHN ANDRUS, a brass caster in the 
employment of the Coe Brass Company 
at Torrington, was born in Solon, 
N.Y.; January 29, 1826. On the paternal 
side he comes of Connecticut stock, his grand- 
father, Simeon, having been a lifelong resi- 
dent of this State. Simeon Andrus was a 
farmer by occupation, and spent his declin- 
ing years in Naugatuck, where Isaac Andrus, 
father of John Andrus, the subject of this 
sketch, was born. 

Isaac Andrus remained at home, assisting 
in clearing and otherwise improving a home- 
stead, until he attained his majority, when he 
began working by the month. Being prudent 
and industrious, he saved some money, and 
with a brother went to Cortland County, New 
York, where they purchased land, and culti- 
vated it in partnership for eight years. At 
the expiration of that time they divided the 
property; and Isaac alone bought another 
farm, and carried on mixed husbandry there 
for several years. In 1850 he came to Tor- 
rington, and lived with his son John until his 
demise. He married Sarah Holmes, a native 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



19s 



of Colerain, Mass. ; but she was reared in 
Cortland County. New York, of which her 
parents were pioneers. She bore her husband 
six children, three of whom are yet living, 
namely: John; Leora, the wife of Sheldon 
F. Potter, of Thomaston; and Erskine, a 
brass caster, with the Bridgeport Brass and is 
Copper Company. The mother also spent 
her last years at the home of her son John, 
dying at an advanced age. 

John Andrus received his education in the 
district schools of his native town. At the 
early age of twelve years he began to be self- 
supporting, working as a farm laborer from 
that time until eighteen years old. He then 
came to Connecticut to take care of his aged 
grandmother and an aunt, who were living at 
Naugatuck. He was also engaged there in 
teaming from 1844 until 1850. Thence he 
went to Waterbury, and began working at his 
present trade with Mr. E. L. Frisbee, a prom- 
inent citizen of that town. He was subse- 
quently employed as a caster for four years 
with the Brown & Elton Company and for 
three years with the firm of Holmes, Booth & 
Hayden. After this he worked in Plymouth, 
now called Thomaston, until 1861, and then 
in the navy yard at Brooklyn, N.Y., for six 
months. Returning then to this county, Mr. 
Andrus was a resident of Waterbury until 
1865, when, early in the month of October, 
he came to Torrington, and secured work with 
the Coe Brass Company. This firm, which at 
that time gave employment to fifty men, now 
keeps a force of one thousand men busily at 
work. He has seen the village grow with the 
business of the company from a hamlet of fif- 
teen hundred souls to a thriving town of 
seven thousand inhabitants. Mr. Andrus has 
been twice married, both wives having been 
daughters of Hezekiah Buckingham, a black- 
smith, of Middlebury. His first wife, Eliza 



A., died after ten years of married life, leav- 
ing five children, four of whom are still 
living, as follows: Sarah, the wife of Horace 
Burr and mother of Noah, Horace J., Edith, 
Alice, Elbert, and Orville Burr; Rollo L. who 
married Mary F. Treat, of Middlebury, and is 
father of Mamie, Charlie B., Howard, Jennie, 
and Emma Andrus; Julia, the wife of Frank 
A. Cook and mother of Lulu, Tessie, and 
Ruth Cook; and Ina, wife of William 
Westerman, the Captain of the Uniform 
Rank, Knights of Pythias, and mother of 
Laura, Willie, Grace, George, and Ina E. 
Westerman. Of the union of Mr. Andrus 
with Mary E. Buckingham two children were 
born, one of whom died at the age of nine- 
teen years. The other, Emma L., married 
Howard C. Doolittle; and they make their 
home with Mr. and Mrs. Andrus. Most of 
the children were educated at the district and 
high schools. Mrs. Doolittle was a success- 
ful teacher prior to her marriage. In politics 
Mr. Andrus was formerly a Republican; but 
he is now identified with the Prohibitionists, 
and was for several years a member of the 
Sons of Temperance. Religiously, both he 
and his wife are faithful members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. He united 
with that organization twenty-eight years ago, 
although he was reared in the Baptist faith, 
his parents having been connected with that 
denomination. He has served as Steward and 
class leader for many years and taken a prom- 
inent part in the Sunday-school, and has been 
a diligent worker in all religious work. 



(gYrMOS C. BENTON, a prosperous 

fcjA farmer of Litchfield, was born in the 

/'^LV house he now owns and occupies, 

January 25, 1834, son of George and Harriet 

B. (Farnam) Benton. Mr. Benton is a de- 



i9t 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



scendant of Ebenezer Benton, an early settler 
in Litchfield, who resided, and subsequently 
died, upon a farm in that part of the town 
known as South Farms. Mr. Benton's great- 
grandfather, Ebenezer, second, and his grand- 
father, Amos Benton, were born upon that 
farm, and there passed their lives, both hav- 
ing ■ been prosperous farmers. Grandfather 
Amos Benton married Rachel Catlin, daugh- 
ter of Dr. Samuel Catlin, of Litchfield; and 
she became the mother of four children. 
Amos Benton died at the age of eighty-eight, 
and his wife died aged sixty-five years. 

George Benton, Mr. Benton's father, was 
reared to agriculture; and at the age of 
twenty-four years he came into possession of 
the farm upon which his son, Amos C. Ben- 
ton, now resides. He completed the present 
house, and followed farming successfully 
until his death, which occurred at the age of 
forty-nine. His wife, Harriet B. Farnam, 
was a daughter of Seth Farnam, Jr., who was 
born in 1777. He was an early settler in the 
town of Morris and a representative of a prom- 
inent family of that section. Mr. and Mrs. 
George Benton were the parents of four chil- 
dren, three of whom are still living, namely: 
Amos C, the subject of this sketch; Jane 
A.; and Phebe F. The mother died at the 
age of seventy-eight years. 

Amos C. Benton at an early age began to 
assist his father in attending to the farm 
duties. After his father's death he succeeded 
to the ownership of the property. In 1887 
there was uncovered in a sand-pit on the place 
an Indian burial-ground and many relics of 
the aborigines, such as arrow-heads, pipe 
bowl charms, spear heads, and tomahawks. 
Mr. Benton has continued to conduct general 
farming, with satisfactory results. He is a 
Republican in politics. Mr. Benton is un- 
married, and his two sisters reside with him. 



They are members of the Congregational 
church. 




ETER CORBIN, the venerable 
gentleman whose portrait is here 
shown, is without doubt at the pres- 
ent time, November 14, 1895, the oldest 
native-born citizen of Colebrook, his birth 
having occurred January 27, 1808, on the 
homestead where he now resides. Already 
has he passed the eighty-seventh milestone of 
his life; but his mind is yet rich in reminis- 
cences of his youth, he remembering well 
the olden times in the century, when rail- ■ 
roads were unthought of, and when the city of 
Hartford, some twenty-five miles away, was 
the most convenient market for the surplus 
productions of the farmers and the principal 
depot of supplies. His Christian name, 
Peter, was borne by his father and his grand- 
father, the latter of whom was born in Wood- 
stock, presumably of early French ancestry. 
Grandfather Corbin spent a few years of his 
manhood in the town of Danbury, removing 
from there to this county and becoming one of 
the pioneers of Winchester. He bought six 
hundred acres of woodland, and cleared and 
improved a farm, on which he and his wife 
passed the remainder of their lives. 

Peter Corbin, second, was born during the 
residence of his parents in Danbury, and was 
there reared to a vigorous manhood. When 
the Colonial struggle for independence took 
definite shape, he was one of the brave 
patriots who laid down the axe and the plough 
to take up the musket and the powder-horn, 
enlisting twice during the Revolution and 
seeing much actual service. In 1796 he came 
to Colebrook, and bought a tract of timbered 
land, which is included in the farm where the 
subject of this sketch now resides. A plank 
house, a frame barn, and a few acres of 




PETER CORBIN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



199 



cleared land constituted the only improve- 
ments of the place. He cleared more land, 
and before many years erected the house in 
which his son Peter still lives. It is well 
built, and having always been kept in excel- 
lent repair has withstood the ravages of time 
and weather. Here he carried on his chosen 
occupation until his death in 1830, at the age 
of sixty-eight years. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Violett Nearing, was an admirable 
helpmeet and companion, looking well after 
the ways of her household, and carding, spin- 
ning, and weaving the home-made garments 
in which the family were clothed. She bore 
him five children; namely, Joseph, Uriel, 
John Starr, Amos, and Peter, the latter being 
the only one now living. 

Peter Corbin, third of that name, has 
watched the transformation of this section of 
his native county from a dense forest, with 
here and there a small hamlet or a solitary 
farm-house, to a rich and populous agricult- 
ural and manufacturing region, and takes sat- 
isfaction in knowing that he has performed 
his part in assisting in its development. He 
has long been known as one of the prosperous 
agriculturists of Colebrook, having diligently 
and successfully cultivated the parental acres, 
a part of which he inherited at the death of 
his father and mother, the remainder coming 
into his possession by purchase. 

He is now passing the golden sunset of his 
days in retirement from the active cares of 
business, enjoying the fruit of his early years 
of industry and thrift. With his kindly face 
and venerable form, he is a well-known pres- 
ence in the community where his years have 
been spent, and is held in high respect by 
young and old. Mr. Corbin has been for 
several years a widower, his wife, Caroline 
Whiting, whom he married in 1834, having 
passed away at the age of sixty-seven years. 



She was a daughter of Seth and Tryphena 

Whitney. 

,*»»i » 

(^s>TRI E. WHITING, of Torrington, pro- 
ir\ prietor of the Grand View Farm, 
Vi»>|i«"— — «^ was born in this town, August 20, 
185 1, son of Frank L. and Julia (Bragg) 
Whiting. Ancestors of Mr. Whiting were 
among the earliest settlers of Torrington ; and 
both his great-grandfather, William Whiting, 
and his grandfather, Uri Whiting, son of 
William, were farmers and lifelong residents 
of the place. 

Frank L. Whiting, Mr. Whiting's father, 
resided with his parents until reaching his 
majority, at which time he went into company 
with his brother on their father' s farm ; but, 
after conducting it for a time, he sold his in- 
terest to his partner, and purchased another 
farm near by. He later sold that property; 
and, after living near the village for two 
years, he bought a tract of land in Win- 
chester, upon which he erected a house, and 
resided there for thirty years, his little farm 
being a favorite resort for summer boarders. 
He passed his declining years at the present 
home of his son, Uri E. Whiting, in Torring- 
ton, where he died at the age of seventy-four 
years. Mr. Frank L. Whiting was well 
known as an intelligent and useful citizen 
and an active member of the Congregational 
church, with which he was for many years 
officially connected. His wife, Julia Bragg, 
was born in Barkhamsted, where her father, 
James Bragg, was a hotel-keeper. James 
Bragg later moved to Winchester, and there 
passed the remainder of his life as a farmer. 
He died at the age of eighty-six, and his wife 
died at the age of seventy-four years. Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank L. Whiting were the parents 
of two children, namely: Uri E., the subject 
of this sketch; and Mariette, who married 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Charles Barnes, of Goshen, Conn., and is no 
longer living. The mother died in Torring- 
ton, aged sixty-nine years, and was buried in 
Winchester. 

Uri E. Whiting began his studies in the 
common schools, and completed his educa- 
tional course at the Winchester Institute. 
He resided with his parents until he was four- 
teen years old, at which time he began life for 
himself by working on a farm, continuing 
thus occupied for three years, then being em- 
ployed by W. S. Lewis for four years in a 
store in Torrington. After that he bought a 
small piece of property in Winchester, where 
he resided for four years, during which time 
he drove a stage; and from there he moved to 
North Canaan, where for two years he was en- 
gaged as a contractor upon the reservoir in 
connection with farming. He then moved to 
Cheshire, New Haven County; and, after fol- 
lowing agriculture there with good results for 
six years, failing health caused him to return 
to Winchester, and for the next four years he 
was engaged in selling hardware upon the 
road. In 1889 he bought his present prop- 
erty, which is known as Grand View Farm, 
consisting of one hundred and twenty-five 
acres of well-improved land; and he has since 
conducted general farming and dairying with 
satisfactory results. He keeps twenty-five 
cows, and furnishes Conley's Inn in Torring- 
ton with milk, cream, vegetables, and ice. 
His farm is valuable on account of its fertil- 
ity, its healthy location, and its elevation, 
commanding a fine view of the surrounding 
country. 

In November, 1876, Mr. Whiting was 
united in marriage with Mary Riggs, who was 
born in Torrington, October 26, 1854. Her 
father, Albert Riggs, is a railroad engineer, 
who has been employed upon various railroads 
in this country and Mexico. Mr. and Mrs. 



Whiting have six children; namely, Blanche, 
Frank, Julius, Irving, Lena, and Clifford. 
Blanche was born in Canaan, Conn., May 9, 
1878. Frank was born in Cheshire, July 
3, 1 881; Julius, in Winchester, January 21, 
1886; Irving, in Winchester, February 28, 
1887; Lena, in Winchester, March 4, 1888; 
and Clifford, in Torrington, July 26, 1890. 
Mr. and Mrs. Whiting and their daughters 
are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and are actively interested in both 
church and Sunday-school work. 

Mr. Whiting is a member of the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen, and was a dele- 
gate to the meeting of the Grand Lodge in 
Boston in 1895. He is connected with the 
New England Order of Protection, and was 
formerly a member of the Grange. He is a 
Republican in politics. 




rail ENRY M. WHITE, proprietor and 
editor of the Daily and Weekly 
Register of Torrington, was born in 
Elba, N.Y., June 24, 1847. He is a son of 
the late George H. and Eliza (Morgan) 
White, and is of Colonial and Revolutionary 
ancestry on both sides, being a direct de- 
scendant of the Hooker Colony. One original 
ancestor was a prominent settler of Spring- 
field, Mass., the other of Hartford. 

Mr. White's paternal grandfather, David 
White, spent the greater part of his life as a 
farmer in the vicinity of Springfield, but died 
in 51ba, N.Y. George H. White owned a 
farnij. in Longmeadow when a young man. 
He was subsequently engaged in farming in 
Elba, Genesee County, N.Y., as a mechanic 
in Shelburne Falls, Mass., and Northampton, 
and as a farmer in Springfield, the last years 
of his life being spent in the latter place, 
where he died at the age of seventy. His 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



wife, whose maiden name was Eliza Morgan, 
was a native of Wilbraham, a daughter of 
Ebenezer Morgan, a farmer. She reared 
three children: Robert A., Hattie E., and 
Henry M. Mrs. George H. White died at 
the age of seventy-two in Torrington. Both 
parents attended the Baptist church. 

Henry M. White lived with his parents 
until twenty years of age. He graduated 
from the high school and from the academy 
at Shelburne Falls. Entering the cutlery 
factory at Northampton, he rose from a sub- 
ordinate position to that of superintendent of 
three departments. He subsequently entered 
the employ of C. W. Dunlap & Co., hardware 
manufacturers in New York City, remaining 
five years. Mr. White next engaged with the 
Union Hardware Company, and came to Tor- 
rington early in 1882. That same year he 
purchased the paper which he now conducts, 
which then had a circulation of five hundred 
and twenty-five. Under his intelligent and 
efficient management the circulation rapidly 
increased, soon reaching nine hundred; and 
in 1889 he added a daily, which in five years 
attained a circulation of eleven hundred. It 
is a lively and popular paper, and is univer- 
sally regarded as a household necessity in 
Torrington, the day not seeming complete 
without a visit from the Register. In 1893 
Mr. White enlarged his building, which is 
forty-five by twenty-two feet in dimension, 
andjs fully equipped with all the latest ma- 
chinery, including a fine large Babcock press. 
He will enlarge again in 1896. A great 
amount of job work is done. Mr. White also 
prints the Tabula, a neat little paper of six- 
teen pages, published monthly by the high 
school, and the Trinity Messenger, for Trin- 
ity Parish. Mr. White was united in mar- 
riage in 1879 to H. Minnie Cole, who was 
born in Brooklyn, N.Y., a daughter of John 



B. Cole, an employing carman of that city. 
Mr. Cole was born in Mahopac, N.Y., and 
was a well-known man in Brooklyn. Mrs. 
White is one of four children, three of whom 
are living. She is an educated lady, a gradu- 
ate of the Brooklyn public schools and of 
Packer Institute. 

Mr. White votes the Republican ticket. 
He was in the State legislature in 1891-92, 
and is a Justice of the Peace. He and his 
wife are members of the Congregational 
church, Mr. White being Sunday-school 
superintendent and his wife a prominent 
teacher, active in all the societies connected 
with the church work. Mr. White was super- 
intendent of the Baptist Sunday-school in 
Northampton five years. He is a leading 
member of the Literary Club of Torrington. 



/ 2JeORGE CAMP, who conducts a well- 
V i> I improved farm in the town of 
Morris, Conn., was born in Kent, an 
adjacent town in the same county of Litch- 
field, January 7, 1824. His father. Miles 
Camp, was a grandson of Jonah Camp, who 
resided in Milford, New Haven County, 
Conn., and was the first ancestor of the family 
to settle in America. His son, Chauncey 
Camp, Mr. Camp's grandfather, was born in 
Milford, April 11, 1754; and, when a young 
man, he settled in New Preston, Litchfield 
County. He engaged in mercantile pursuits 
and in the manufacture of nails, which he 
followed with advantageous results. He 
became a large land-owner, and aside from his 
business enterprise he was a successful farmer 
and merchant. He also ran a saw-mill, and 
was the first Postmaster of New Preston. 
He died at the age of ninety years. He 
and his wife, Sally Baldwin, reared a family 
of six children: Jeremiah; Miles; Sheldon; 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Burr; Clarissa; and Comfort, who became 
Mrs. Porter. The grandmother lived to 
reach the advanced age of over ninety years. 

Miles Camp was born in New Preston, Sep- 
tember 12, 1790. He adopted agriculture as 
an occupation, and resided in New Preston 
until his marriage, when he moved to Kent 
Hollow, where he settled upon a farm. He 
was an energetic and successful farmer, mak- 
ing various improvements upon his land and 
buildings; and he lived on one farm for 
seventy years, or until he was ninety-nine 
years old, at which time he went to Ohio, 
where he died in December, 1893, having 
reached the unusually advanced age of one 
hundred and three years. He possessed many 
worthy traits of character, was an intelligent 
and useful citizen, and was for many years a 
prominent figure in local public affairs. 

His wife, Cyrene Beeman, who was a 
daughter of Daniel Beeman, of Warren, be- 
came the mother of eight children, as follows: 
William J., who died at the age of eight 
years; Henry P., who married for his first 
wife Maria Strong, for his second Melissa 
Thomas, and for his third Mrs. Cornelia 
Thomas, and had one daughter by his first 
union, named Frances; Charles, who married 
Ruth A. Strong, and has two children — 
Fergus M. and Charles; George, the subject 
of this sketch; Harriet, who is now Mrs. 
Newton; Daniel B., who married for his first 
wife Laura M. Hill and for his second Eliza- 
beth Brooks; Augustus B., a resident of 
Warren, who married for his first wife Mary 
Peet and for his second Julia Strong, and has 
one child named Mary by his first union; and 
Augusta, who became Mrs. Kenney, and has 
had five children, namely — Miles, Winona 
(deceased), Abner, Wall Lee, and Burton. 
The mother lived to reach the advanced age of 
ninety-eight, and died in January, 1889. Mr. 



Camp's parents attended the Congregational 
church. 

George Camp acquired his elementary edu- 
cation in the district schools of his native 
town ; and, after taking a high course of study 
at the New Preston Academy, he taught 
school with gratifying success for fourteen 
seasons. He then settled on his present farm 
in Morris, where he has now resided for many 
years, having become one of the most promi- 
nent and well-to-do farmers in the town. He 
is an active member of Morris Grange, No. 
119, and in his political principles he is a 
strong Prohibitionist. 

In 1850 Mr. Camp was married to Sarah W. 
Warner, daughter of Niram and Sylvia (At- 
wood) Warner, of Woodbury. They have two 
children: Harriet A., who became Mrs. Her- 
bert S. Babbitt, and had two children — Sadie 
A. and Arthur J., the latter of whom died 
aged twenty years; and Ida F., who is now 
Mrs. Joel W. Skilton, and has one son, named 
Merritt C. Mrs. Babbitt died at the age of 
thirty-nine, and her husband died aged thirty- 
one years. Mr and Mrs. Camp attend the 
Congregational church. 



LfRANK A. PICKETT, of Torrington, a 
J_ Ij well-known ice dealer, is an excellent 
representative of the industrial ele- 
ment of this part of Litchfield County and 
one of the substantial business men of the 
town in which he resides. He is a Pennsyl- 
vanian by birth and breeding, born June 17, 
1867, but is of New England ancestry, his 
paternal grandfather, Samuel Pickett, having 
been born and reared on a Connecticut farm. 
When a young man, Samuel Pickett removed 
to Pennsylvania, where he purchased land, and 
worked at farming until his death at an ad- 
vanced age. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Anson Pickett, son of Samuel, was born in 
the Keystone State, and received his educa- 
tion in the district schools, in the mean time 
assisting on the home farm. At the age of 
nineteen years he went to work by the month, 
finally locating in the town of Rush, Susque- 
hanna County, Pa., where he purchased a 
farm, continuing as a tiller of the soil during 
his years of active life. He died when but 
forty-five years old. The maiden name of his 
wife, who is still a resident of Pennsylvania, 
was Sarah Bennett. She is a native of Tus- 
carora, Pa., being the daughter of Ferris Ben- 
nett. Of the seven children born to her and 
her husband five are now living, as follows: 
George, who married Flora Baker; Minnie, 
wife of David Heaney; Frank A., whose name 
heads this brief record; Merton; and Will- 
iam. The parents were highly regarded as 
neighbors, friends, and citizens, and were 
valued members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. In politics the father was identified 
with the Republican party and a warm advo- 
cate of its principles. 

Frank A. Pickett was but eight years of 
age when he had the misfortune to be left 
without a father's care. He remained with 
his mother through his early years, and ac- 
quired a good common-school education. 
When old enough to begin manual labor, he 
secured a place on a neighboring farm, and 
for three years worked by the month. Com- 
ing then to Connecticut, Mr. Pickett went to 
work for a firm of ice dealers at Waterbury, 
and during the two years he remained in their 
employ became familiar with the business. 
The succeeding two years he was engaged in 
handling the same cool commodity at Birm- 
ingham, whence he came to Torrington. Pur- 
chasing the business of E. A. Perkins, who 
had been for some time dealing in ice in this 
community, Mr. Pickett has since remained 



here, and has built up a large and profitable 
trade, running three delivery wagons at the 
present time. He is an industrious, hard- 
working man, fair and square in his dealings, 
and has the respect and patronage of the best 
people in the town, his prompt and strict 
attention to his business and his courteous 
manners making him a most agreeable and 
popular tradesman. 

In 1890 Mr. Pickett married Mrs. Lillie 
C. Dayton Woodward, daughter of William 
Dayton, of Woodbury. Mr. and Mrs. Pick- 
ett are both active members of the Congre- 
gational church, and are highly esteemed 
throughout the community. In his political 
views he is a true-blue Republican, sustain- 
ing his party by vote and voice. 



^AMES T. MORGAN, general manager 
of the Morgan Silver Plate Company 
of Winsted, Conn., was born at Had- 
dam Neck, Conn., July 24, 1839. He is a 
son of Jarvis A. Morgan and a descendant of 
Miles Morgan, one of the first settlers of 
Springfield, Mass., whose bronze statue stands 
in Court Square in that city to-day. 

Jarvis A. Morgan was a native of Marlboro, 
Conn., where he was born in 1809. He was 
a blacksmith by trade, and was a man of more 
than ordinary ability and intellect, being a 
great reader and a deep thinker. Though his 
school advantages were limited, he educated 
himself to a remarkable extent, and was well 
versed in law and the sciences; and, like Eli- 
jah Kellogg, he often had a book for his com- 
panion. He moved from Marlboro to Haddam 
Neck in 1826, and there established his home, 
living to be over eighty-one years old. His 
wife, whom he married in 1828, Fannie A., 
daughter of Solomon Arnold, lived but one 
year after his decease. Their graves are in 



204 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the church-yard at Haddam Neck. Their 
children, who were reared to habits of virtue 
and industry, comprised seven sons and two 
daughters, six of whom are living, namely: 
Jarvis Alonzo, on the home farm; Almira, in 
Meriden, Conn., widow of Samuel A. Camp; 
Egbert, a farmer in Holyoke, Mass. ; James 
T., the subject of this sketch; Hubert W., a 
silver plate worker in Meriden, a man of re- 
markable mechanical genius, which he is sup- 
posed to have inherited from his mother's fam- 
ily; Loren T., a farmer in Meriden ; Lucretia 
P., formerly a teacher, now the wife of Henry 
A. Chapman, of North Scituate, R.I.; John 
B. , an academic student, a man of inventive 
genius. 

Newton Isaac Morgan, deceased, was a 
blacksmith by trade and a volunteer in the 
Twenty-fourth Connecticut Regiment, after a 
few months' service being promoted from the 
ranks to be Second Sergeant of his company. 
He was wounded at Port Hudson by a spent 
ball, and, from the combined effects of this 
wound and a chronic disease contracted durine 
his army life, died at the age of twenty-two, 
at his father's home. 

James T. attended the common schools until 
sixteen years of age, in the mean time working 
on a farm and in his father's shop. He then 
entered the employ of L. Boardman & Son, of 
East Haddam, Conn., manufacturers of Bri- 
tannia spoons, German and nickel silver- 
plated table ware, and, with the exception of 
two terms at school, worked for fourteen years 
for this firm, familiarizing himself with a 
large part of the business, and in dull times 
taking any kind of work that was offered him. 

Slowly he worked his way up, advancing 
step by step and taking charge of different 
branches, until finally he was made superin- 
tendent of the German silver factory, which 
position he held for four years. A more favor- 



able situation being offered him by the Strono- 
Manufacturing Company, manufacturers of 
undertaker's goods, of Winsted, Conn., in the 
spring of 1870 Mr. Morgan came to Winsted 
in the interest of that company, and in Janu- 
ary, 1872, was made a director of the company 
and superintendent of the hardware depart- 
ment. This position he held until 1887, when 
he disposed of his interest, and the same year 
organized the Morgan Silver Plate Company 
for manufacturing undertakers supplies. 
This corporation is now a stock company with 
a capital of twenty-five thousand dollars. It 
is one of the most prosperous concerns of the 
age and kind, and its success is largely due to 
the ability and energy of Messrs. Morgan & 
Granger, its directors. Of Colonel Granger a 
sketch will be found on another page of this 
volume. Mr. Morgan has been general man- 
ager of the company since its organization. 

Mr. Morgan was married on November 12, 
1865, to Nellie V., only daughter of Samuel 
and Cynthia E. (Chapman) Mitchell, of 
Moodus, Conn. Mrs. Morgan received a lib- 
eral education, making a study of music, for 
which she had a natural taste. She was mar- 
ried at twenty ; and two sons have blessed the 
union, brilliant and high-principled young 
men, of whom the parents are justly proud. 
The elder, Arthur H., who has recently at- 
tained his majority, is a travelling salesman 
for the Morgan Silver Plate Company. He 
studied first at the Winsted graded school, 
and then for a term at a business college, and 
later on at the military school at Bordentown, 
N.J., afterward taking a special course in 
music, vocal and instrumental. He has nat- 
ural musical talent, and is a fine violinist. The 
younger son, Elmer E., a promising youth of 
sixteen, is an accomplished pianist, and is now 
a pupil of the Gilbert High School. 

Mr, Morgan is a Republican in politics, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



205 



has always been interested in Lodge matters, 
having belonged to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Encampment since his 
twenty-first year, and has passed all the chairs 
up to the Grand Lodge, which he has repre- 
sented. With his wife and family he is an 
attendant at the First Congregational Church. 
On coming to Winsted Mr. Morgan sold his 
estate in East Haddam and bought the pleasant 
home at 17 Walnut Street, where the family 
have resided for over twenty years. 



KEANDER B. PALMER, a prosperous 
farmer of Roxbury, Conn., son of 
«^ Charles H. and Betsey B. (Blake- 
man) Palmer, was born in this town December 
17, 1857. Mr. Palmer's paternal grandpar- 
ents, Seth and Hannah (Disco) Palmer, were 
residents of Bedford, N.Y. ; and Charles H. 
Palmer was born there on November 19, 18 14. 
His parents died when he was very young; and 
he came to Washington, Conn., where he 
learned the hatter' s trade, an occupation which 
he followed for twenty years. He then bought 
a farm near Weller's Bridge, which he later 
sold; and in 1875 he settled upon the farm 
that is now owned by his son, Leander B. 
This property, formerly known as the George 
Hudson farm, consists of one hundred and 
sixteen acres of well-improved land. Mr. 
Charles H. Palmer successfully conducted gen- 
eral farming until his death, which took place 
on June 8, 1893. He was a Republican in 
politics and a Congregationalist in religion. 
His wife, Betsey B. Blakeman, who was born 
December 25, 181 7, daughter of Isaac Blake- 
man, became the mother of one son, namely : 
Leander B., the subject of this sketch, with 
whom she now makes her home. 

Leander B. Palmer received his education in 
the public schools, and at an early age began 



to assist in the work of the farm. Since the 
death of his father he has managed the prop- 
erty with energy and good judgment, making 
various improvements. His tillage land is in 
a high state of cultivation, and Mr. Palmer 
occupies to-day a position among the leading 
farmers of the neighborhood. In April, 1895, 
a large barn containing his cattle and horses 
was struck by lightning, resulting in the total 
destruction of the buildings and their contents, 
a loss not easily repaired, but which was not 
allowed to discourage this thrifty husbandman. 
On April 30, 1889, Mr. Palmer was united 
in marriage to Nettie Mallory, a daughter of 
Daniel and Mary A. (Lane) Mallory, of Rox- 
bury. Mr. and Mrs. Palmer have two chil- 
dren, as follows: Charles H., who was born 
March i6, 1892; and Asa D., born October 
31, 1894. Mr. Palmer is a Republican in 
politics, and is a Free Mason. 




'^ EORGE W. RICHMOND, formerly 
i> I a successful contractor and builder 
and at the present time Postmaster of 
New Milford, was born in this town, October 
I, 1844, son of George and Janet (Wat.son) 
Richmond. Mr. Richmond's father was born 
in New Milford in 1819, and received his edu- 
cation in the common schools. When a young 
man he entered mercantile pursuits on Bennett 
Street in his native town. He continued 
there for a time and then conducted a general 
trade in Gaylordsville and Park Lane; but his 
life, which promised a successful future, was 
cut short by consumption, his death occurring 
in 1847, at the early age of twenty-eight years. 
He was an able and progressive young man, a 
Democrat in politics, and a member of the 
Episcopal church. 

His wife, Janet Watson, was a daughter of 
William and Lucy (Picket) Watson. She was 



206 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of Scotch descent, her father, William Wat- 
son, Sr. , having been born in Churnside, Ber- 
wickshire, Scotland, January 6, 1773. He 
emigrated to New York in 1795, and became 
an early settler in New Milford, where he fol- 
lowed his trade of stone mason until his death, 
which was caused by an accident, when he was 
fifty-eight years old. Mr. Watson's wife, 
Lucy Picket, whom he married November 14, 
1807, became the mother of nine children: 
William, George, Sally, Wellington, Joseph, 
John, Janet, Robert, and Wallace. Mr. and 
Mrs. George Richmond were the parents of 
two children : George W., the subject of this 
sketch; and Isabella, who died at the age of 
two years and six months. The mother died 
in September, 1895, aged seventy-three. 

George W. Richmond attended the public 
schools of his native town, and later entered 
St. Paul's Preparatory School at Brookfield, 
Conn., where he was graduated in 1863. He 
then went to England and remained abroad 
several months. At the age of twenty-three 
years he learned the carpenter's trade, which 
he followed as a journeyman for some years, 
and later became a contractor and builder. 
He continued in that calling with good results 
until November, 1893, when he received the 
appointment of Postmaster of New Milford, a 
position which he has since filled with ability. 
He is a Democrat in politics, and has been a 
member of the School Board for fourteen 
years. He owns a pleasant residence, situated 
in the outskirts of the village, which he 
erected in 1878. 

On July s, 1869, Mr. Richmond was united 
in marriage with Ellen Hosey, of Waterbury, 
Conn., daughter of Patrick and Bridget 
(Lynch) Hosey. They have had six children, 
as follows: Francis X., who was born July 18, 
1870, and is now a law student; Joseph B., 
born May 15, 1872, who was a printer, and 




died in 1893; George P., born April 24, 
1874, who is a printer by trade and is acting 
as Assistant Postmaster; M. Bella, born May 
25, 1880; Matthew W., born August 7, 1883; 
and Fabian, born December 20, 1886. Mr. 
Richmond is a prominent member of the 
Roman Catholic church, and has been a trus- 
tee for the parish at New Milford for a number 
of years. 

'- <^ •^fc 

RS. JULIA E. HOLMAN 
PHELPS resides in the town of 
Colebrook, Conn., on one of the 
old homesteads which has been in the posses- 
sion of the Phelps family for more than a cen- 
tury. The buildings are charmingly situated 
on a rise of ground, commanding an extensive 
view of the surrounding country, and are of the 
good substantial sort that stand for comfort 
and convenience, the entire farm being one of 
the best in point of improvements of any in 
the vicinity. Mrs. Phelps was born in Ben- 
nington, Wyoming County, N.Y. Her father, 
Benjamin Franklin Holman, a native of New 
Hampshire, was a son of Jonathan Holman, 
who migrated from New England to New York 
State. He made the removal with teams, part 
of the way following a path marked by blazed 
trees. He settled in the town of Stafford, 
Genesee County, where he improved a farm 
from the wilderness, residing there until his 
death. He and his wife, whose maiden name 
was Sawyer, reared several children. 

Benjamin F. Holman was a young lad when 
his parents removed to New York. He lived 
with them until his marriage with Mary Mar- 
shall, a daughter of Dr. Silas Marshall, of 
Stafford, when he removed to the town of Ben- 
nington, then in Genesee County, but now 
included within the limits of Wyoming 
County. Buying a tract of land from which a 
few acres had been cleared, and on which there 




HORACE M. PHELPS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



209 



were a log house and a log barn, he lived there 
about eighteen years, clearing more land and 
replacing the log structures with substantial 
frame buildiiigs. He then sold at an advantage 
and removed to Conneaut, Crawford County, 
Pa., where he bought a farm on which he car- 
ried on mixed husbandry until after the death 
of his wife, when he retired from active pur- 
suits, spending the rest of his days with his 
son-in-law at Summer Hill, dying at the age 
of seventy-eight years. Eight children were 
born to him and his wife, namely: Albert M., 
who died in childhood ; Sarah A. ; Candace 
J. ; Julia E. (Mrs. Phelps) ; Mary A. ; Sylvia 
J. ; Cynthia M. ; and Chastina A. 

Julia E. Holman resided with her parents 
until her marriage at the age of eighteen 
years'. Her husband, Horace Matthew Phelps, 
was born in Colebrook, June 18, 1825. His 
father, Ralzamon Phelps, was a son of John 
and Betsey (Bingham) Phelps, the former 
being a native of Enfield, Conn., and a pioneer 
settler of Colebrook. Ralzamon Phelps was 
reared as most farmers' sons, in the winter 
attending school, and laboring in the summer 
season on the farm, to the ownership of which 
he finally succeeded. He married for his first 
wife Mary Coy, a native of Norfolk ; but she 
passed to the higher life at the early age of 
twenty-two years, leaving her infant son, Hor- 
ace Matthew. The father was a second time 
married, but the only child of that union is 
not living. On the death of his mother Hor- 
ace was placed in the charge of his maternal 
grandmother, who reared him to a useful 
manhood, sending him to the district school 
and afterward to the Norfolk Academy. On 
completing his school life Mr. Phelps spent 
a few months in Hartford, where he learned 
the photographer's art, going from there to 
Mexico, where he resided a year. Then, after 
a visit in Ohio, he returned to Litchfield 



County, and for two years had a studio in 
Winsted. 

Mr. Phelps then removed with his family 
to Rock Creek, Ashtabula County, Ohio, and 
was the leading artist of that place until 1878, 
when, his father dying, he returned to the 
old homestead, which became his by virtue 
of inheritance. Here he devoted his time and 
energies to agricultural pursuits, carrying on 
the home farm with the same skill and success 
that had characterized his ancestors, winning 
an assured position among the respected and 
valued members of the community. He passed 
from earth February 12, 1893, leaving an hon- 
orable record of a well-spent life. The only 
child born of their pleasant union was Mary A., 
who married Augustus Curtiss, of Norfolk, 
and is the mother of two children, Horace 
Phelps Curtiss and Samuel A. Curtiss. 

This brief memoir of the late Horace M. 
Phelps is supplemented by a lifelike portrait 
on a neighboring page. 




lEV. JOHN CALVIN GODDARD, 
pastor of the Congregational church 
_ in Salisbury, was born in Brooklyn, 
N.Y., September 18, 1852, son of James E. 
and Catherine F. (Jennings) Goddard. Mr. 
Goddard's grandfather, Hezekiah Goddard, son 
of Daniel Goddard, was engaged in the trading 
and shipping business in New London, Conn. 
He served as Quartermaster-general during 
the War of 1812. Hezekiah Goddard died at 
the age of eighty years. He married Eunice 
Rathbone, daughter of John Rathbone, of New 
York City, and reared a family of six children, 
as follows: Eunice, John, James E., George 
W., Juliet R., and Sarah, 
aged eighty-four. 

James E. Goddard, Mr 
was born in New London 



The mother died 



Goddard's father, 
in 1 817. He en- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



gaged in mercantile pursuits, and conducted a 
wholesale dry-goods business in New York 
City from 1833 to 1874. He resided in 
Brooklyn from 1850 to 1862, at the expiration 
of which time he removed to Yonkers, N.Y. ; 
and after residing there for twelve years he re- 
turned to New London and passed the remain- 
der of his life in that city. He was an active 
member and an Elder of the Presbyterian 
church in Yonkers, and was a Deacon of the 
Congregational church in New London. He 
was a man of strong convictions and great 
benevolence, having special affection for dumb 
animals and comprising in his own person a 
humane society. He was a particular friend 
of the colored race, and taught up to the week 
of his death a large class of them, whom he 
had gathered in the city. He was deeply read 
in history and theology, and wielded a trench- 
ant pen in public discussions. He was so 
gifted in prayer and remembered unfailingly 
so many persons that on his decease a friend 
made this opportune and characteristic remark, 
"The prayers of David, the son of Jesse, are 
ended." James E. Goddard died in New 
London in 1893, aged seventy-six. His wife, 
Catherine F. Jennings, was a daughter of 
Nathan T. Jennings, of New York City, where 
she was born in 1819. She became the 
mother of eleven children, nine of whom 
lived to maturity, namely: Juliet R., who 
became Mrs. Henry T. Thomas; Catherine A. ; 
Eunice C. ; John C, the subject of this sketch ; 
Walter L. ; Caroline M., now Mrs. Salter S. 
Clark; William L. ; George F. ; and James C. 
The mother died November 23, 1895. 

John C. Goddard commenced his education 
in the public schools of Yonkers, and after 
attending the New London High School he 
entered Yale University, from which he was 
graduated with the class of 1873. He pursued 
his theological studies at the Chicago Theolog- 



ical Seminary, and after graduating in 1881 
was ordained a minister in Chicago in June of 
the same year. He was pastor of the West- 
ern Avenue Congregational Church in Chi- 
cago until 1884, in which year he received and 
accepted a call to the Congregational church in 
Salisbury. He was installed pastor of this 
church on October 16, 1884, and has since 
resided in Salisbury. 

On August 2, 1883, Mr. Goddard married 
Harriet W. Allen, daughter of Dr. Charles L. 
Allen, of Rutland, Vt. Mr. and Mrs. God- 
dard have seven children, namely: Catherine; 
Miriam and Rose, who are twins; Charles 
Allen; John Calvin, Jr.; Louisa Page; and 
Ruth Salisbury. 



W^^ 



ESTON G. GRANNISS, of the firm 
of Granniss & Elmore, general 
merchants of Litchfield, was born 
in this town February 16, 1855, son of Asa 
and Sally Granniss. Mr. Granniss's great- 
grandfather, William Granniss, who was a 
native of East Haven, Conn., settled in 
Litchfield in 178 1. He purchased a farm sit- 
uated about five miles west of the village, 
which is now owned and occupied by his 
great-grandson, Mr. Granniss's brother, and 
followed agricultural pursuits until his death. 
Thomas Granniss, Mr. Granniss's grandfather, 
was born in 1787. He succeeded to the pos- 
session of his father's farm, which he con- 
ducted with prosperous results, and died at 
the age of eighty-nine years. He married 
Ruth Stone, who was born in Litchfield, 
April 9, 1787. 

His youngest son, Asa Lyman Granniss, 
father of the subject of this sketch, was born 
on the old homestead, January i, 18 14, and 
died there January 13, 1894, aged eighty 
years, having spent his whole life on the same 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



211 



farm. He married March 13, 1849, Sally, 
daughter of Miner and Polly Potter. Miner 
Potter was a son of Benjamin Potter, who was 
born in East Haven in 1763, and settled in 
Litchfield at an early date. He was a soldier 
in the Revolutionary War, and participated in 
the defence of New London. He died in 
Litchfield, and was buried at Bantam. In 
early life Miner Potter learned the carpenter's 
trade, and assisted in the erection of many of 
the older residences of Litchfield, where he 
was well and favorably known. He died 
December 12, 1850, aged sixty-three years. 
His wife, Polly (jrey, whom he married in 
1 81 7, was born in Danbury, Conn., and was a 
daughter of Joseph Grey, a farmer of that 
town. Five children blessed their union, of 
whom three are still living: Garry G., who 
resides at New Milford; Sally, Mr. Granniss's 
mother; and Julia, who married Jason St. 
John, and lives at Hammonton, N.J. Sally 
(Mrs. A. L. Granniss) was born December 
IS, 1 82 1, and has been a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church over fifty years. 
Two children only were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
A. L. Granniss: Fremont M., who still re- 
' sides on the old homestead; and Weston G., 
the subject of this sketch. 

Weston G. passed his boyhood days "down 
on the farm," and got most of his education at 
the "little school-house under the hill," one 
winter being spent at the Gunnery School at 
Washington. He then entered the employ of 
Baker & Brinsmade, general merchants of 
that town, as man of all work, and after two 
years of hard and conscientious labor gained 
the distinction of being their confidential and 
trusted head clerk, which position he held 
until the close of his services with them, in 
all nearly five years. He then accepted a po- 
sition with Bennett, Sloan & Co., wholesale 
grocers of New Haven, Conn., and became 



one of their travelling salesmen. After con- 
tinuing in their employ two and one-half 
years, he returned to Litchfield, and bought 
of C. M. Ganung his interest in the firm of 
Ganung & Elmore. The present firm of 
Granniss & Elmore was established February 
I, 1882, with this motto, " Everything guaran- 
teed as represented." Its progress has been 
onward. The firm started with no capita] 
other than stout hearts, willing hands, and a 
firm determination to win. They enjoy the 
confidence of the public, who accord them a 
liberal patronage, which they merit. The fin- 
est delicacies prepared in this and foreign 
countries are among their grocery stock. 
They also carry' a large line of dry goods, car- 
pets, wall papers, etc., and enjoy the reputa- 
tion of doing the largest mercantile business 
ever done at Litchfield. 

Mr. Granniss is a Republican in politics. 
He is a Past Master of St. Paul's Lodge, A. F. 
& A. M., of Litchfield, having filled all the 
chairs of the Blue Lodge, is at present District 
Deputy of Litchfield County, and is also offi- 
cially connected with the Chapter and Council. 
He is a member of the Connecticut Commer- 
cial Travellers' Association, having been one 
of the early members of the organization. 

On February 20, 1879, he married Louise 
Glover, only daughter of Julius and Jeanette 
(Bolles) Glover, of New Preston, Conn. 
Mrs. Granniss's grandfather, Elisha Glover, 
was a prosperous farmer and lifelong resident 
of Warren, where her father was born. Julius 
Glover acquired the trade of a stone-cutter, 
and followed that occupation until failing 
health caused him to retire from active labor. 
He served three years in the Civil War as a 
member of Company G, Nineteenth Regiment, 
Connecticut Volunteers. His wife died May 
4, 1895. Mrs. Granniss is a member of the 
Congregational church. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 




'AMUEL R. SCOVILLE, although 
.one of the youngest in the farming 
community of Cornwall, is already 
ranked among its most enterprising members 
and is highly esteemed as a man of integrity 
and good business judgment. He was born 
March 27, 1866, son of Ralph I. and Maria E. 
(Wadhams) Scoville. He occupies the old 
Scoville homestead in the north part of the 
town, which belonged to his grandfather, 
Jacob Scoville, who also was a native of 
Cornwall. 

Grandfather Scoville was a practical and 
prosperous farmer. He devoted considerable 
attention to town affairs, serving in the vari- 
ous offices; and he was a member of the State 
legislature during two sessions of that body. 
He was seventy-five years old at the time of 
his death. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Martha Ingersoll, was born in Bethlehem, 
Conn. They had one son, Samuel, who died 
in infancy; and they reared two sons and a 
daughter, as follows: Ralph I., Eliza M., and 
Samuel. Eliza M. Scoville married William 
C. Rogers, of Cornwall, and has three children 
living, all married and settled 'in Sheffield, 
Mass. Her younger brother, the Rev. Samuel 
Scoville, who is settled in Stamford, Conn., 
has a summer residence in Cornwall, adjoining 
the homestead. He married Harriet Beecher, 
daughter of the Rev. Henry Ward Beecher and 
grand-daughter of Dr. Lyman Beecher; and 
they have a family of four children. 

Ralph I. Scoville was born on the old Corn- 
wall homestead and continued to live here dur- 
ing his life. He was very successful as a 
farmer, and, like his father, gave considerable 
of his time to town affairs and other public 
interests. In 1876 he served in the State leg- 
islature, and he was many times elected to fill 
responsible town offices. He died May 15, 
1887. He married Maria E. Wadhams, a 



daughter of Lewis C. Wadhams, of Goshen, 
Conn., and they became the parents of the fol- 
lowing children : Irving J., who married Miss 
Carrie French, of Boston, and has two sons 
and a daughter — Elizabeth, Ralph, and Fred- 
erick ; Martha, wife of James H. Moser, who 
has two daughters — Grace and Lydia; Lydia; 
Samuel R. ; and Frederick R. Mrs. Maria 
E. Wadhams Scoville, now sixty-five years of 
age, enjoys a good degree of health and mental 
vigor. 

Samuel R. Scoville learned his early lessons 
in the common schools, and pursued a higher 
course of study at Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Mass., where he was graduated. He then 
returned to the old homestead to live with his 
parents. He is now the manager of the farm, 
which contains three hundred acres of land, 
divided between pasturage and tillage. Mr. 
Scoville is a charter member of North Corn- 
wall Grange, No. 32. 



LTrANCIS benedict SMITH, M.D., 
IjIj, who is living in pleasant retirement 
at West Winsted, Litchfield County, 
Conn., is a native of this section of the State, 
Norfolk being the place of his birth, which 
occurred May 14, 1816. His father, Erastus 
Smith, a native of Sandisfield, Berkshire 
County, Mass., was a son of Dr. Amos Smith, 
who was a practising physician in that town 
for many years, and died there at the age of 
seventy-five. 

Erastus Smith married a fair maiden of Con- 
necticut, Wealthy Benedict, who was born in 
Norfolk, daughter of Francis Benedict, a na- 
tive of the same place. Her paternal grand- 
father, also named Francis Benedict, was born 
in Danbury, Fairfield County, and removed 
from there to Norfolk in 1760. He was the 
first settler in the north-east part of the town, 




FRANCIS B. SMITH. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2IS 



following the way from the central part by a 
trail marked by blazed trees. He bought a 
tract of timber, and soon the merry blows of 
his axe could be heard as he hewed the giants 
of the forest to make an opening in which to 
build a log house to shelter himself and fam- 
ily. He stopped not to dig a cellar, but made 
a hole in the bank to keep the potatoes and 
vegetables which he afterward raised; and by 
dint of persevering labor he cleared a good 
farm, on which he passed the remainder of his 
life, dying at the age of seventy-five years. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Mary Lyon, 
outlived him more than two decades, attaining 
the remarkable age of ninety-seven years. 

Their son Francis ably assisted his parents 
in clearing and conducting their farm from the 
time he was old enough to wield axe or hoe, 
and with the exception of two or three years 
that he was employed in a shovel factory at 
Colebrook Centre lived in Norfolk, at the 
death of his father succeeding to the ownership 
of the homestead property. He was a nat- 
ural mechainic, and in addition to tilling the 
soil he owned and oj3erated a saw-mill and 
turned out wooden dishes. He lived to the 
age of seventy-five. He married Judith Wal- 
ter, a native of Goshen, in this county; and 
she, too, spent her last days on the home farm, 
living to the age of seventy-six years. 

Erastus Smith was a young man when he 
left his Sandisfield home to become a resident 
of Litchfield County, and was at first employed 
on the farm of Dr. Phelps at Colebrook Cen- 
tre. Two years after his union with Miss 
Benedict he bought a farm in Norfolk. Two 
children were born to them, namely: Mary C, 
who married Heman Swift, and died Novem- 
ber 19, 1883; and Francis Benedict, of West 
Winsted. The father died in 1875, in his 
eighty-fifth year; and the mother died in her 
eighty-seventh year. 



Francis received the 'rudiments of his educa- 
tion in the district school, and at the age of 
nineteen turned his attention to the study of 
medicine, taking a thorough course and receiv- 
ing a diploma from the New Haven Botanic 
Medical Society, and later one from the 
Thompsonian Medical Society of the State of 
Connecticut. Dr. Smith began the practice 
of his profession at New Britain, going thence 
to New York City to take charge of the infirm- 
ary located at 119^^ Bowery. Returning to 
Norfolk after a few months' practice in the 
metropolis, he came into possession of a farm 
given him by his grandfather Benedict; and he 
soon after married and began the pursuit of 
agriculture. In addition to general farming 
the Doctor continued his professional duties, 
and also manufactured essences and oils from 
the medicinal plants of the locality, reaping 
a good profit as well as pleasure from his 
labors. In 1877 he came to West Winsted; 
and, buying his present estate, which contains 
five acres of land, he erected the fine residence 
in which he has since lived in quiet retire- 
ment. In reviewing the work of his life Dr. 
Smith recalls with interest the fact that he 
assisted in teaming the marble pillars for 
Girard College from South Egremont, Mass., 
to Hudson, N.Y., the huge blocks weighing 
about eleven tons, and being drawn by eleven 
horses hitched tandem. 

Dr. Smith was first married October 20, 
1840, to Sarah, daughter' of General Josiah and 
Amelia (Cowles) Wolcott. She was born at 
Sandisfield, Mass., June 5, 1819, and departed 
this life December 9, 1841, leaving no issue. 
He subsequently married Eliza W. Wolcott, 
a sister of his first wife; and she passed to the 
higher life January 9, 1894. By this union he 
has one son, the Rev. Wolcott Francis Smith, 
who has been a Baptist minister for over 
twenty years. He was born September 24, 



2 l6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1844, and on the twenty-third anniversary of 
his birth, September 24, 1867, was united in 
marriage to Mary E. Webster, of Sandisfield, 
a daughter of Deacon Abner S. and Mary M. 
(Alford) Webster. They also have one son ; 
he bears the name of Francis Abner Smith, 
and is now attending Colgate College, Hamil- 
ton, N. Y. , in the class of 1896. 

Dr. Smith has always afifiliated with the 
Democrats. His first Presidential vote was 
cast for Martin Van Buren in 1840. Always 
active and influential in local affairs, he served 
in various offices of trust and responsibility, as 
Selectman, Assessor, member of the Board of 
Relief, Justice of the Peace three terms, and 
juror at the Superior Court while in Norfolk, 
and in Winsted has been a member of the 
Board of Relief six years for the town and 
two years for the borough, and also of the 
Grand Jury. He is a conscientious member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, with 
which his wife united shortly before her death, 
having in her earlier years been connected 
with the Congregational church in Sandisfield, 
Mass. 

An excellent portrait of Dr. Smith is a 
pleasing accompaniment of this biography. 



B 



ANIEL YOUNGS, an experienced 
agriculturist and an extensive lum- 
ber manufacturer and dealer, is 
widely and favorably known as one of the 
leading business men of Barkhamsted. He 
was born on May 23, 1814, in the town of 
Farmington, which was also the place of 
nativity of his father. Constant Youngs, who 
was born March 20, 1790. 

Joshua Youngs, father of Constant; was born 
August 17, 1750, on Long Island, and was a 
patriotic soldier of the Revolutionary War. 
He subsequently removed to this State, locat- 



ing in Farmington, where he purchased a tract 
of land, on which he afterward carried on 
general farming. He died there April 17, 
1 82 1. His wife, whose name before marriage 
was Hannah Sanford, was born at Saybrook, 
Conn., January i, 1751, and died on the 
Farmington homestead. She reared four of 
her children; namely, Thomas, Constant, Seth, 
and Joshua. 

Constant Youngs grew to manhood on the 
paternal homestead, a part of which he event- 
ually inherited; and he there continued with 
his brothers, engaged in agricultural labors, 
until his decease, in his thirty-seventh year, 
on October 29, 1826. He wooed and won as 
his life companion Miss Cynthia Higgins, who 
was born in Avon, Conn. Mrs. Cynthia 
Youngs survived her husband a few years, 
dying September 17, 1834, leaving five chil- 
dren, as follows : Daniel ; Constant, Jr. ; 
Edward; Hannah; and Emeline. 

Daniel Youngs spent his early years at 
Farmington, and after leaving the district 
schools of that place he pursued his studies at 
the academies of New Britain and Hartford. 
From the age of sixteen to twenty-one years he 
resided at the latter city, making his home 
with an uncle, and working at the carpenter's 
trade. In 1836 Mr. Youngs came to Bark- 
hamsted, accompanied by his brother. Con- 
stant, to look after their landed interests. 
Their grandfather had here purchased a large 
tract of wild land, located on both sides of the 
Farmington RiveV. Their father had inherited 
a portion of the original tract, and the brothers 
had come into possession of their father's 
share. They at once erected a dwelling-holise, 
and, after building a dam, put up a saw-mill 
and engaged in the manufacture of lumber, 
their first contract being to furnish chair stock 
to the contractors at the State prison. A few 
years later Constant sold his interest to his 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



217 



brother Edward, who has since been associated 
with their brother Daniel in his manufactur- 
ing, and likewise in his agricultural business, 
they being very prosperous in other branches. 
On December 9, 1840, Mr. Daniel Youngs 
was united in marriage with Ann Amelia 
Whittlesey, who was born in Farmington, May 
23, 1815. Her father, Harvey Whittlesey, 
was a native of this county, born in the town 
of Washington, of which his father, Joseph 
Whittlesey, and his grandfather, Martin Whit- 
tlesey, were both lifelong residents. Joseph 
was a farmer by occupation, and married Mary 
Camp. Their son Harvey was reared to man's 
estate in his native town ; but when he left the 
parental roof he went to Farmington, where he 
married Ruth D. Whittlesey, a daughter of 
Abner and Ruth (Wadsworth) Whittlesey. 
He engaged in farming, and finally settled on 
the farm which his wife inherited, residing 
there until his decease, at the advanced age of 
seventy-seven years, outliving his wife, who 
died at the age of forty-seven years. Mr. and 
Mrs. Youngs have two children living, 
namely: Harriet W., who married Henry Bar- 
bour, and has one daughter, Anna Youngs; 
and Wilfred D., who married Lily Eggleston. 
Mr. Youngs is an ardent advocate of the prin- 
ciples of the Democratic party, and cast his 
first Presidential vote in 1836 for Martin Van 

Buren. 

< • ■■ > 

TT^HARLES THOMAS LOVELL was 
I Sf born in Sharon, Conn., and here spent 

V^ ^ his entire life— an industrious and 
useful citizen, in his early manhood being 
engaged in mercantile business, and later giv- 
ing his attention to farming. At the time of 
his death, in 1876, he was fifty-seven years 
old. His great-grandfather, John Lovell, 
came to Sharon from South America in 1770. 
He had ten children: Sarah, Mary, Amy, 



Jonah, Priscilla, Lois, Cynthia, John West, 
Aime, and John Williams, the last three of 
whom died in infancy. Jonah Lovell married 
Betsey Barlow, and settled on his father s farm. 
They had three children — Laurain, Almira, 
and John Barlow. 

In 1 81 8 John Barlow Lovell married Cla- 
rissa Chaffee, who died in 1824; and in 1825 
he married Catharine M. Gold. His children 
by his first wife were: Elizabeth, Charles 
Thomas, and John Chaffee; by the second, 
Almira, Sarah H., Clara G., Henry R., Lucy 
E., Mary W., Frances M. C, Helen, and 
Laura G. John C. Lovell, who owns the old 
homestead, has one son, Edward Swan, living 
in Newtown, Fairfield County, Conn. Eight 
of the twelve children of John B. Lovell are 
living — one in Connecticut, one in Massachu- 
setts, four in Michigan, one in Idaho, and 
one in California. 

Charles Thomas Lovell purchased a part of 
his father's farm, and built, at a short distance 
from the original home, the house in which 
his son, Rodney L., now resides. He married 
Miss Roana P. Woodward, a daughter of David 
W. Woodward, of Sharon, Conn. She is now 
living, and is sixty-nine years of age. Four 
sons and a daughter were born of their union, as 
follows: Charles Henry, Susan E., John Bar- 
low, David Woodward, and Rodney Lincoln. 
Charles Henry Lovell was born in 1849, and, 
though now living in New York State, in the 
town of Northeast, Dutchess County, is less 
than six miles from his birthplace. In 1875 
he married Mary Orinda Couch, of Washing- 
ton, Litchfield County. Their children are: 
Helena May, Herbert Elmore, Charles Arthur, 
Irving Howard, Amy Orinda, and Lawrence. 
Susan Eliza Lovell, born in 1851, was mar- 
ried in 1877 to Charles E. Buckley. They 
live in Sharon, and have one son, Edward Mar- 
shall Buckley. 



2l8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



John Barlow Lovell, born in 1852, in early 
manhood spent a few years in Flint, Mich., 
engaged in repairing clocks and watches. 
Failing health and his father's death brought 
him back to Connecticut. In 1877 he married 
Elizabeth A. Reynolds, by whom he has six 
children : Roana Knibloe, David Henry, Mary 
Reynolds, Blanche Buckley, Helen Maria, and 
John Barlow. David Woodward Lovell, born 
in 1854, married in July, 18S3, Sarah A. 
Woodward, and died in September of the same 
year in McPherson, Kan. His widow lives in 
Sharon. • 

Rodney Lincoln Lovell was born on his 
father's homestead in Sharon on April 6, i860, 
and has always remained here with the excep- 
tion of a few years spent in the West. He is 
now engaged in carrying on the farm, which 
contains about one hundred and sixty acres. 
He was married in 1888 to Miss Anna Ells- 
worth, of Dover, N. Y. They have three chil- 
dren : Charles Thomas, Raymond Stevens, and 
Clara Louise. 



m 



ILLIAM E. BATTAM, a leading 
surgeon - dentist of New Milford, 
Litchfield County, Conn., was born 
in London, England. Dr. Battam's father, 
Septimus Battam, was born in London, March 
25, 1822. He was successfully engaged as a 
contractor during the greater portion of his 
active life, but spent his last years in retire- 
ment. He died on September 6, 1886. He 
married Sarah Martin; and they reared six 
children, as follows: William E., the subject 
of this sketch, Sidney, Alice, Annie, Her- 
bert, and Alfred, all of whom are living. 
The mother still survives, and resides in 
England. 

William E. Battam received his elementary 
education in England, where he also pursued 
his professional studies. When a young man, 



he came to America; and, after spending a 
year in Toronto, Canada, he settled in New 
York City, where he engaged in the practice of 
dentistry. He conducted a very prosperous 
business for nine years, becoming well and 
favorably known in the metropolis as an ex- 
pert in his profession. In January, 1881, he 
moved to New Milford, and, opening pleasant 
and centrally located parlors on Bank Street, 
has created for himself an extensive practice. 
He has gained the reputation of being 
thoroughly reliable in all branches of dentis- 
try, and is considered particularly successful 
in filling and the production of artificial 
teeth. He is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Fire Department, 
the Young Men's Christian Association, and 
the B. P. O. Elks. 



§OHN J. CARROLL, a leading mason, 
builder, and contractor in Winsted, 
was born in Canaan, Conn., in 185 1. 
His parents were John E. and Bridget (Sulli- 
van) Carroll, both natives of Ireland. 

John E. Carroll was born in 181 5, and 
spent nearly thirty years of his life in his na- 
tive land. In 1844, with his wife and one son, 
he took passage for America, and after a long 
and tiresome voyage landed safely, going al- 
most immediately to Stockbridge, Mass., 
where he found employment as a laborer, 
working for Judge Byington for several years. 
He was employed for some time by the Bar- 
num & Richards Furnace Company in Canaan, 
Conn., and removed with his family to this 
place. Here his son, John J., was born, as 
stated above. 

In 1857 Mr. John E. Carroll joined the 
westward-flowing tide, going to California by 
way of the Isthmug of Panama. On his ar- 
rival he went to work in the mines, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



219 



labored there for four years, accumulating 
some money. He died in the winter of 1891 
at his home in Connecticut. He was a very 
industrious man, and worked almost up to 
the time of his death. His widow survived 
nearly two years, reaching the age of eighty- 
one. The wedded life of Mr. and Mrs. John E. 
Carroll, covering fifty-two years, was marked 
by mutual respect and support, each doing un- 
complainingly the allotted task. Hale and 
strong to the last, they were a remarkable old 
couple. They reared five of their six chil- 
dren, namely: M. W. Carroll, a salaried em- 
ployee of a large packing-house in Kansas 
City; Ellen, who died in Winsted in 1862, 
when just budding into womanhood; Nora, 
wife of John H. Swift, a manufacturer at 
Union, N.Y. ; Mary, wife of Paul McLough- 
lin, of Winsted, both now deceased; and John 
J., of Canaan. An elder son, John, died at 
the age of seven. 

John J. Carroll left the district school at 
the age of thirteen, and hired himself out to 
a farmer for six dollars a month, staying with 
him two years. The last year his wages were 
raised to ten dollars. He then started to 
learn the blacksmith's trade, but changed his 
mind, and went to work in a hoe factory. At 
eighteen he became a mason's apprentice, in 
the employ of Burt & Hart, and served in that 
capacity three years for small pay. In 1874, 
having mastered the trade, he went into busi- 
ness with S. F. Rowe, the firm name being_ 
Carroll & Rowe. This partnership lasted five 
years, at the expiration of which time Mr. 
Rowe went to Torrington, Conn.; and since 
then Mr. Carroll has carried on the business 
without a partner. A practical mason, he 
has built some of the best large structures in 
this vicinity, notably the handsome brick 
house and barn of Eugene Potter, the Paro- 
chial School, the convent of Notre Dame at 



Waterbury, the Burr & Lee Block in Win- 
sted, the new high school, and the school 
building at the Gilbert Home, the two latter 
in 1894. He has also erected several factory 
buildings in Winsted. 

On Thanksgiving Day, 1876, Mr. Carroll 
was married to Harriet, daughter of George 
and Sarah (Baker) Dyson, the former a skilled 
mechanic in the employ of the Empire Knife 
Company for the past thirty years. Mrs. 
Dyson died in 1888, at the age of fifty-four, 
leaving three sons and three daughters. Mr. 
and Mrs. Carroll have seven children, as fol- 
lows: Matthew G., a young man, living with 
his parents, an able assistant to his father; 
Mary A., a school-girl; George, a boy of 
thirteen; John, Charles, Frank, and Fannie, 
whose ages range from eleven to three. Mr. 
Carroll belongs to the Roman Catholic church. 
His home at No. 4 Mountain Avenue, which he 
built in 1880, is very pleasantly situated. 



IRA C. HOTCHKISS, an enterprising 
and successful business man of Water- 
town, Conn., dealer in flour, feed, 
baled hay, and straw, was born in Watertown, 
August 19, 1 86 1, son of Augustine and 
Clarinda (Catlin) Hotchkiss. Mr. Hotch- 
kiss's grandfather, Ira Hotchkiss, resided in 
Watertown for many years. He was a well- 
educated man, who in his younger days en- 
gaged in teaching school; and he also taught 
penmanship as a specialty. He finally 
adopted farming as- an occupation, which he 
followed with gratifying success for the rest 
of his life. He died in Watertown at the age 
of over sixty years, having reared a family of 
eight children. 

His son, Augustine Hotchkiss, who was 
born in Hartland, Conn., grew to manhood on 
the home farm. Later he became widely 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



known as the driver of the stage from Water- 
town to New Haven, making two round trips 
per week; and he was a resident of Water- 
town until his death, which took place when 
he was sixty-nine years old. His second 
wife, Clarinda Catlin, was a daughter of 
Deacon Cyrus and Emeline (Whetmore) 
Catlin, the former of whom was a native and 
highly esteemed resident of Litchfield, active 
in the Congregational church. He died in 
1872, aged seventy-two. His wife, who 
lived to reach the age of seventy-nine, reared 
a family of seven children. Mrs. Augustine 
Hotchkiss became the mother of but one son, 
Ira C, the subject of this sketch. Both par- 
ents were members of the Congregational 
church. 

Ira C. Hotchkiss acquired a common-school 
education in his boyhood and youth, and at 
the age of nineteen went to Oakville, where 
he learned the trade of a machinist in the 
shop of Joseph H. Baird, a pin manufacturer. 
After remaining there for three years, he en- 
tered the employ of the Oakville Pin Com- 
pany, later accepting a position as tool-maker 
for the Waterbury Buckle Company, with 
whom he remained four years. In 1893 he 
purchased the old established flour and feed 
business which is located near the depot in 
Watertown, and has since conducted a thriv- 
ing retail trade. 

He is a Republican in politics, and has 
served upon the Town Committee for several 
years. He is a member and Secretary of 
Federal Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Water- 
town, a member of Granite Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons, of Thomaston, and is also con- 
nected with A. H. Terry Lodge, Order of 
American Mechanics, Columbia Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias, and is .a member of the 
Watertown Fire Department. On October 
16, 1885, Mr. Hotchkiss was united in mar- 



riage with Mary J. Dunbar, of Harwinton, 
who was born in the State of Ohio. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hotchkiss have two sons: Arthur Ray- 
mond and Floyd Dunbar. Mr. Hotchkiss at- 
tends the Congregational church, of which his 
wife is a member. 




ON. ISAAC B. BRISTOL, ex-pro- 
prietor of the New England House, 
the leading hotel of New Milford, 
Conn., and a man who during his long resi- 
dence in this town has been closely identified 
with many other business enterprises, was 
born in Brookfield, Fairfield County, Conn., 
on December 21, 1821, son of William B. and 
Eliiia (Baldwin) Bristol. His father, who was 
also a native of Brookfield, was born in the 
first year of the present century. He owned 
a large farm and was one of the leading agri- 
culturists and most enterprising men of his 
day. 

Isaac B. Bristol enjoyed not only the privi- 
leges of the district schools of Brookfield, but 
he also attended successively the Quaker 
School in Dutchess County, New York, and 
the Newtown (Conn.) Academy. When he 
was fifteen years old he obtained a position as 
clerk in a store at Brookfield, Conn. ; and after 
staying there a year he returned to the farm 
for a short time. His next year's work was 
as a clerk in Bridgeport, Conn. Having by 
this time acquired practical knowledge of mer- 
cantile affairs, he now bought his employer's 
business and conducted it for himself during 
the succeeding twelve months, at the expira- 
tion of which he sold out and was subsequently 
engaged for a year as a clerk in New Milford. 
His next business venture was the purchase of 
a half-interest in the lime kiln of S. W. 
Stevens at Boardman Bridge. Following that 
Mr. Bristol began to deal in cattle and horses, 




ISAAC B. BRISTOL. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



223 



and made frequent trips to Canada in company 
with Eli F. Booth to purchase horses, of 
which he is an excellent judge. It is scarcely 
needful to remark that he still takes pride in 
keeping some fine horses for his own use and 
enjoyment. He continued to engage in that 
business at intervals for about thirty years, 
during which time he was employed as a clerk 
for a year, and likewise gave much attention 
to buying and selling farms and other real 
estate. 

He first settled on the farm in New Milford, 
now owned by Mr. Halpine, and after carrying 
that on and making various improvements in 
the buildings and land, in 1867 he purchased 
the old Ezra Noble home, one of the first 
houses built in New Milford. It had previ- 
ously been remodelled and converted into a 
store and hotel by L. Lum ; and from the time 
of his purchase up to October i, 1895, Mr. 
Bristol continued to successfully conduct it 
as a hotel. Being a gentleman of pleasing 
address and courteous ways, and withal a thor- 
ough business man, he won not only the re- 
spect and esteem of his fellow-townsmen, but 
the favor of the travelling public, who re- 
garded him as an admirable host and gave him 
a liberal share of patronage. For a number of 
years he has been largely interested in the 
tobacco business in company with M. Staub, 
the firm being the largest packers in this 
town. He has sold his hotel property and 
retired from that business, but yet holds a 
goodly amount of real estate, comprising a 
two-thirds interest in the block at the corner 
of Church and Main Streets, his fine residence 
on Main Street, an excellent farm in New 
Milford, and three in the town of Brookfield, 
besides large cattle ranches in Texas and Mon- 
tana. 

Mr. Bristol was married in 1845 to Miss 
Annis Roberts, a daughter of Benjamin and 



Hannah (Downs) Roberts. The Roberts fam- 
ily have been residents of New Milford since 
about 1750, when Eli Roberts settled on a 
farm a mile east of the village. Mrs. Bristol 
died in 1894, at seventy-three years of age, 
leaving no children. 

Mr. Bristol has always been keenly inter- 
ested in whatever would conduce to the highest 
welfare and improvement of the town, being a 
man to be relied upon in the furtherance of 
any worthy enterprise. Politically, Isaac B. 
Bristol is a Democrat. He represented his 
district in the State Assembly six years and 
two years in the Senate, and was Selectman of 
New Milford thirteen years, besides filling 
many minor offices. He is a Director of the 
First National Bank of New Milford, also of 
the savings-bank, and Vice-President of the 
latter, Director of the New Milford Water 
Company, and Director of the Bridgeport 
Wood Finishing Company. 

We are happy to give place on another page 
of the "Review " to an excellent portrait of this 
widely known, public-spirited, and influential 
citizen. 

4-*«^ > 

iRS. LORETTA GEER, widow of 
Milo Geer, of Kent, .Litchfield 
County, Conn., has for the most 
part of her life resided in New Milford vil- 
lage, where she was born on July 27, 181 3, 
and is a daughter of Nathan and Margaret 
(Piatt) Bishop and a grand-daughter of Eber 
and Betsey (Wheeler) Bishop. Her grand- 
father Bishop, who was one of the early 
settlers of New Milford, and followed the oc- 
cupation of a farmer, died in 1806, at sixty- 
four years of age. 

Nathan Bishop was a native of New Mil- 
ford, and spent his whole life here success- 
fully, engaged in agriculture. He died in 
1848, aged sixty-nine years. His wife sur- 




224 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



vived him five years, dying in 1853, at the 
age of seventy-four. Nine children were born 
of their union, namely: Wheeler, Charlotte, 
and another child, who died in early life; 
William P., who died in 1848, at thirty years 
of age; Susan, Betsey, and Harriet, all of 
whom reached an advanced age; Polly and 
Loretta, now Mrs. Geer, the two latter being 
the only survivors of their father's family. 

Loretta Bishop received such educational 
advantages as her parents' circumstances per- 
mitted of, and acquired in early womanhood a 
thorough knowledge of the housekeeper's art. 
On March 29, 1837, she became the wife of 
Mile Geer, a son of Gardner and Hester 
(Titus) Geer. His parents owned a large 
farm in Kent, and were progressive and 
enterprising citizens of that place. After 
marriage Mr. and Mrs. Geer settled on a farm 
in Kent, where they spent twelve happy years 
together. On July 7, 1849, in an unsuccess- 
ful attempt to save his sister's boy from 
drowning, Mr. Geer lost his life. He left his 
widow with a son and daughter: Henry F. 
and Flora. The former married Miss Mary 
E. Stone, of Woodbury, Conn., and now lives 
in Turlock, Stanislaus County, Cal., where 
he is a large land-owner, and deals exten- 
sively in grain, and is well known throughout 
the State. He and his wife have four chil- 
dren, two sons and two daughters; namely, 
Julia A., Charles, Caroline L., and Frederick 
M. Henry F. Geer enlisted in the First 
New York Mounted Cavalry in 1861, and 
served four years, during which he was a 
special despatch carrier to General Benjamin 
Butler, and held many other offices of trust. 
He is a member of the Masonic order. 

The daughter, Flora Geer, was married on 
October 17, i860, to Andrew T. Stilson, who 
is also a Mason. His parents were John, Jr., 
and Elvira (Turrill) Stilson, his father being 



a son of John and Rachel (Bostwick) Stilson, 
of Little Falls. For many years he owned and 
conducted a grist-mill in New Milford, having 
learned the business in his father's mill at 
Little Falls. Mr. Andrew T. Stilson's great- 
grandparents were Moses and Hannah (Trow- 
bridge) Stilson. Mrs. Andrew T. Stilson 
died young, leaving a son and daughter, 
namely: John H., who married, and resides 
in Kansas; and Flora G., who has always 
lived with her grandmother. She is a charm- 
ing and cultured young lady, and one of 
the most active workers in the Congrega- 
tional church. 

After her husband's death Mrs. Geer came 
to New Milford village, where she has since 
resided. She still enjoys a good degree of 
health, and, though over eighty-two years of 
age, contemplates a trip to California to visit 
her son, who is now her only child. She is 
held in the highest esteem by all who know 
her, and contributes liberally toward the sup- 
port of the Episcopal church of New Milford, 
of which she is a member. 




^ENJAMIN F. HUMESTON, man- 
ufacturer of soda and mineral 
waters and the owner of a fine 
three-story block in New Milford, Conn., was 
born in Little Rest, Dutchess County, N.Y., 
on April 9, 1845. His father, Bennett 
Humeston, was also a native of Little Rest, 
N.Y., where he followed with success the 
twofold vocation of a farmer and merchant. 
He died at eighty-two years of age. His 
wife, Amy White Humeston, is now in her 
eighty-fourth year. 

Benjamin F. Humeston received a good 
practical education in his native town. On 
starting out for himself, he engaged in the 
hotel business for two years, and then in 1869 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



225 



came to New Milford, and entered into the 
grocery and retail liquor business on Railroad 
Street, continuing in that for six years. He 
then purchased the New Milford hotel, which 
he conducted with success until 1880, when 
he engaged in the manufacture of soda and 
mineral water and bottled goods of various 
kinds, carrying on a large business for four- 
teen years. In 1894 he purchased a vacant 
lot adjoining the BoUes Block, and the fol- 
lowing year had completed the best block in 
the city, a three-story structure, fifty-two by 
seventy-two feet in ground area. The first 
story is used for business purposes ; and the 
second and third floors are divided into four 
flats, all equipped with modern conveniences, 
being supplied with hot and cold water and 
lighted by gas, which he manufactures him- 
self. He still continues the bottling busi- 
ness, and has everything in first-class shape. 
Back of his block he has a fine new barn. 

In 1891 he purchased a lot on Treadwell 
Avenue, where he built his present attractive 
residence. In 1864 he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Susan M-. (Cromers), a 
daughter of Andrew Cromers. Their union 
has been blessed by the birth of three chil- 
dren, as follows: Charles A., born December 
8, 1878; Amy, born June 8, 1886; and 
Thalia C, born April 16, 1889. Mr. 
Humeston is a loyal Democrat. Mr. and 
Mrs. Humeston are members of Myrtle 
Lodge, No. 16, Daughters of Rebekah Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, of Danbury. 
He also belongs to the Order of the Good, 
Shepherd, No. 65. 



ISAAC H. HUTCHINSON, a well- 
known farmer of Litchfield, was born 
July 26, 1844, in Perry, Wyoming 
County, N.Y., where his father, Louis 



Hutchinson, a native of Canaan, Conn., lived 
for some years, engaged as a millwright. 

From Perry Mr. Louis Hutchinson went to 
Amenia, Dutchess County, where he was em- 
ployed five years. He then became head car- 
penter for the Harlem Railroad Company, and 
after a residence of nine years in Millerton, 
N.Y., came to Litchfield, Conn., where for 
several years he followed his trade. _ From 
Litchfield he moved to Cornwall Bridge, and 
there made his home for the next two years. 
Then, returning to New York State, he erected 
a grist-mill in the vicinity of Wassaic, which 
he operated for ten years, at the expiration 
of which time he moved to Irondale, and 
later went to Millerton, where he died, aged 
seventy-six years. He married Olivia Hig- 
ley, of Binghamton, N.Y., by whom he had 
two children: Louis E., who resides in Mil- 
lerton, N.Y. ; and Isaac H., the subject of 
this sketch. The mother died in Millerton, 
aged eighty-two years. 

Isaac H. Hutchinson received a -common- 
school education, and acquired the mill- 
wright's trade of his father, with whom he 
worked for some time. In 1870 he came to 
Litchfield, and has since resided upon the 
Wheeler farm of two hundred acres, which he 
conducts with good results. The property is 
well located, and is devoted principally to 
diarying. 

On January 22, 1869, Mr. Hutchinson was 
united in marriage with Jennie E. Wheeler, 
daughter of Charles D. Wheeler, a well- 
known and highly esteemed citizen of Litch- 
field, a very successful farmer. Mr. Wheeler 
was born in Stonington, November 18, 1817. 
His grandfather, David Wheeler, was a na- 
tive and lifelong resident of Stonington, 
prosperously engaged in farming. He was 
the father of nine children. Christopher 
Wheeler, son of David and father of Charles, 



226 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



moved with his wife and three children from 
Stonington to Litchfield, where he settled 
upon a farm which adjoins the property of his 
son. He became prominent in public affairs, 
and represented his district in the State legis- 
lature. Another son of David Wheeler was a 
member of the Connecticut House of Repre- 
sentatives for several years. Christopher 
Wheeler's wife, Orinda Galloupe, a native of 
Groton, Conn., became the mother of nine 
children, three of whom are still living, 
namely: Mrs. Jacob Morse, of Torrington; 
Mrs. Williamson; and Charles D. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hutchinson have had four 
children, namely: one who died in infancy; 
Charles Wheeler Louis; Carrie May; and 
Mary Elizabeth, who died September 8, 1878, 
aged eight months. The son was graduated 
from Eastman's Business College at Pough- 
keepsie, N.Y., where he stood very high 
in his studies. The daughter was educated 
at Mrs. Cady's Ladies' Seminary in New 
Haven, Conn. Mr. Hutchinson is a Demo- 
crat in politics, and has served as Justice of 
the Peace. The family attend the Episcopal 
church. 



Y^ORENZO SAMUEL NASH, promi- 
IJT nent among the prosperous farmers of 
'^^ — - ^ Winchester, was born on the farm 
where he now resides, December 30, 1823, 
son of the late Alvah Nash. John Nash, his 
paternal grandfather, was of English ancestry, 
born probably in West Hartford, where he 
spent his youth and early manhood. He came 
from there to Winchester Centre to pursue his 
trade of a joiner, and subsequently bought 
the land now occupied by his grandson. He 
cleared a considerable part of it, and resided 
there for the remainder of his life. The 
maiden name of his wife was Esther Whiting, 
a native of Torrington and a daughter of 



William Whiting. They reared a large 
family, of whom one son and four daughters 
lived more than fourscore years. 

Alvah Ndsh, son of John Nash, was born 
in the homestead established by his father, 
and was reared to farming as it was pursued in 
pioneer times. After attaining his majority, 
he purchased a woollen mill, and engaged in 
the manufacture of cloth for a few years. 
Eventually succeeding to the paternal estate, 
he was afterwards engaged in general farming 
until his decease, which occurred in the 
eighty-eighth year of his age. He married 
Rebecca Sage, who was a daughter of Enos 
Sage, one of the most respected citizens of 
Colebrook. She lived to celebrate the eighty- 
second anniversary of her birth. Two chil- 
dren only were born to them: Susan and 
Lorenzo Samuel. The daughter, who died at 
the age of thirty-seven years, married Isaac 
A. Bronson, of this town. 

Lorenzo Samuel Nash obtained his early 
education by attending the district school 
when it was in session. In the intervals he 
worked on the -farm, becoming as familiar 
with its duties as with his studies. In 1849 
he took a prospecting trip to the newer coun- 
try of the West, making Michigan his destina- 
tion. The facilities for travelling were not 
as great as now; but he chose the most ex- 
peditious route, going by stage to Canaan, 
thence by rail to Buffalo, where he took a 
boat for Detroit, and completing his journey 
to Memphis, Macomb County, by stage. 
After a stay of two months in that vicinity 
Mr. Nash returned. He has been the sole 
owner of the property since the death of his 
parents. He has made many valuable im- 
provements, including the erection of a sub- 
stantial stone house and other necessary 
buildings for successfully carrying on his 
work. The residence is finely situated on 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



227 



Maple Avenue, and commands a charming 
view of the surrounding country. 

On January 28, 1852, Mr. Nash was united 
in marriage with Caroline E. Tuller, a native 
of Winchester, born November 30, 1827. 
Her father, Orin Tuller, was born in Sims- 
bury, Conn., the town in which his father, 
Thaddeus Tuller, spent his entire life. Orin 
Tuller came to Winchester when a lad of 
twelve years as an apprentice to his uncle, 
William Bunnell, a blacksmith, with whorn 
he worked a number of years. He subse- 
quently bought a farm about a mile west of 
the centre of the town, and, erecting a black- 
smith's shop there, worked at his trade, and 
carried on general farming until his death, at 
the good old age of seventy-eight years. The 
maiden" name of his wife, mother of Mrs. 
Nash, was Elizabeth Chase, a native of Win- 
chester, a daughter of Gedeliah and Rebecca 
(Dewey) Chase. She was a woman of great 
personal worth, a capable and faithful help- 
mate; and her death, at the age of sixty-four 
years, was a great loss to her family, and 
mourned by neighbors and many friends. The 
family circle of Mr. and Mrs. Nash includes 
three children; namely, Rebecca, Susan, and 
William L. Rebecca married Daniel Mur- 
ray, and has one daughter, Emily, and a son, 
Fred, aged three years. Susan, the wife of 
Wilbur Bronson, has five children: Theron, 
Marjorie, Wilbur B., Robert, and Helen. 
William L. has been twice married. His 
first wife, Ella G. Griswold before marriage, 
died at the age of twenty-three years, leaving 
two children: Florence and 'Rebecca. His 
second wife, formerly Catherine H. Spear, 
has borne him one daughter, Susan. The 
political creed of Mr. Nash is Democratic, 
while in religious opinions he is in sympathy 
with the tenets of the Congregational church, 
of which his good wife is a faithful member. 



'ClDWARD R. WOOSTER, of Bridge- 
P water, a leading member of the farming 
^ community of this county, was born 

in this town, September 17, 1861, son of 
Peter and Caroline (Morris) Wooster. He 
belongs to one of the oldest families in the 
vicinity, the first of his line in Bridgewater 
being Jabez Wooster, son of Timothy, who 
was born in Derby in 1730, and who on Sep- 
tember 4, 1772, purchased one hundred acres 
of land in Bridgewater. Jabez Wooster 
cleared this property, and, erecting a set of 
good buildings, established there a comfort- 
able home, where he spent the rest of his 
life. He had but two sons : Peter and Isaac. 
Peter, who was the great grandfather of Ed- 
ward R. Wooster, was born in 1762, spent 
his life on the homestead, and died in 1798. 
He married Betsey Canfield; and they reared 
two children: John and Susannah. John, 
who was born in 1790, made the most of the 
advantages afforded by the district school, and 
became one of the best teachers of his day. 
According to the custom of those times, he 
taught only in the winter season, while he did 
farm work in the summer. He soon accumu- 
lated enough money to purchase his sister's 
interest in the homestead, to which he was 
much attached, and on which he made many 
improvements. In politics a Republican, he 
stood high in the esteem of his fellow-parti- 
sans. He was elected to the State legisla- 
ture, served as Selectman many terms, and 
filled other offices of less importance. John 
Wooster was esteemed by all who knew him, 
being an upright business man and always 
mindful of his neighbor's int'erest. He died 
at the age of sixty-eight. He married 
Jerusha, daughter of David Lockwood; and 
they reared four children: Mary E., Peter, 
David, and Susan. 

Peter Wooster, father of Edward R., was 



228 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



born April 6, 1820. He received a good edu- 
cation, and when a young man engaged like 
his father in teaching school. He followed 
this occupation intermittently until he was 
forty-five years of age. He then became in- 
terested in the manufacture of hats in Bridge- 
water, and was actively engaged in that busi- 
ness till 1 871, when he bought the Trow- 
bridge farm. This property contained eighty 
acres of good land in a situation commanding 
one of the finest views in the State. Mr. 
Wooster remodelled the buildings, and made 
many improvements, spending his last days 
in the enjoyment of a model country home. 
In 1880 he was elected Representative to the 
legislature on the Democratic ticket, and he 
has filled in turn almost every office within 
the gift of the town. He died May 24, 
1893. His wife, Caroline, born January 28, 
1824, was a daughter of Roswell Morris, of 
Bridgewater. She died December 18, 1892. 
They were both members of the Episcopal 
church. Peter and Caroline (Morris) Wooster 
reared the following children: Laura, born 
June 14, 1847, who married Richard Randall, 
and died August 29, 1880, leaving one child 
— Jennie C; John M., born September 5, 
1850, who died January 14, 1856; Charles, 
born January 13, 1857, a physician and sur- 
geon of Tariffville, Conn., who married Mattie 
Adams, and has two children — Vivian and 
Charles; and Edward R., whose name heads 
this article. 

Edward R. Wooster succeeded his father as 
owner of the homestead, and added by pur 
chase thirty acres to the original property. 
He is successfully engaged in general farm- 
ing, making a specialty of tobacco and dairy 
products, and is one of the leading citizens of 
the town. He well sustains the high stand- 
ing of the family, so honorably represented by 
his father and grandfather. He has been 



twice married. His first wife was Julia E., 
daughter of Bruce Beach, of Bridgewater. 
She died at the age of twenty-seven, leaving 
one child, Kate B., who was born September 
28, 1886. Mr. Wooster subsequently married 
Mary L., daughter of Henry T. B. and Mary 
C. (French) Brown. Mr. Brown, who was a 
teacher of mathematics, died in 1873, at the 
age of forty-five. His wife died "December 
10, 1895, at the age of sixty-five. They were 
the parents of five children, namely: Henry 
S. , married to Delia G. Shaw; George H.; 
Mary L., Mrs. Wooster; Alice; and Minnie. 
The last two died in childhood. 

Politically, Mr. Wooster favors Democratic 
principles. He represented his town in the 
State legislature in 1895-96. In religious 
belief he and his wife are Episcopalians. 



"slTAMES H. LINSLEY, a portrait of 
whom is here given, is a well-known 
and much esteemed citizen of Wood- 
bury, Litchfield County, Conn. He was born 
in this town, April 18, 1827, in a house 
which stood opposite his present residence. 
He is a son of Harvey J. and Mary (Summers) 
Linsley, and grandson of Daniel Linsley, a 
farmer of Branford, Conn., who lived and died 
in his native town. 

Daniel Linsley married a Miss Jones, of 
Branford; and their son, Harvey J., was also 
a native of that town. He learned the cabi- 
net-maker's trade when a boy, and by economy 
and industry saved money enough to start in 
business in a small way as a cabinet-maker 
and undertaker. In 1822 he purchased a lot 
of land in Woodbury, where he built a small 
shop, and here engaged in the manufacture of 
household furniture. He brought with him a 
hearse; and, as it was the first one seen in 
the town, it was an object of wonder. His 




JAMES H. LINSLEY. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



231 



furniture business soon beginning to increase, 
he took in a number of apprentices, and en- 
larged his factory, which eventually grew to 
generous proportions, and was furnished with 
a horse-power to turn out bedsteads. This 
curious machinery his son has preserved. 
Mr. Harvey J. Linsley was reputed the finest 
mechanic ever known in Woodbury, and the 
fame of his skill spread far and near. His 
taste also was admirable, and the trees which 
he planted are to-day a pleasing ornament to 
the town. He became quite wealthy, and 
was a large property owner at the time of his 
death, which occurred in 1853. Politically, 
he was a member of the old Whig party. He 
was public-spirited and generous, and was 
universally respected. In religious belief he 
was a Congregationalist. Mr. Linsley was 
twice married. His first wife, Laura Clark, 
of Southington, died in 1824, leaving one 
daughter, Mary A. His second wife, Mary 
Summers, who was a daughter of William and 
Joanna Summers, of Huntington, died on Jan- 
uary II, 1879, of old age. She was the 
mother of three children: James H., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; Laura, wife of E. F. 
Bassett; Jane, who died December 27, 1855, 
aged twenty-one years. 

James H. Linsley received his education in 
the public schools of Woodbury. He served 
as an apprentice under his father, and adopted 
his motto,. "Good work always"; and in 1852 
he took full charge of the business, disposing 
of the furniture manufacturing industry about 
1880, but retaining the salesrooms and the 
undertaking department. In the mean while 
he devoted his spare time to farming and 
cattle-dealing, purchasing largely in the 
West. He has now for years carried on an 
extensive trade in live stock; and he owns 
several farms, including the Nathaniel Smith 
and the Curtis farms on Good Hill and the 



Benedict and Minor farms on the Pomeraug 
River. His furniture business is in a 
flourishing condition; and, as he is the only 
undertaker in the town, the demand for him 
in that line is very great. He has had charge 
of over twenty-seven hundred funerals, in- 
cluding the obsequies of a number of centena- 
rians. Mr. Linsley inherits his father's fine 
taste ; and his beautiful home, surrounded by 
well-kept lawns and shaded by magnificent 
elm-trees, which he planted in 1850, is one of 
the handsomest pieces of residential property 
in the county. 

October 9, 1849, Mr. Linsley married 
Harriet E., daughter of John and Maria (Gil- 
bert) Curtis, of Woodbury, and received from 
his father a house and land for a wedding 
present. Mrs. Maria Gt Linsley died in 

1879, at the age of fifty. She was the 
mother of three children : Sarah E., born in 
September, 1851, who died March 13, 1871; 
Anna, who died June 18, 1869, in childhood; 
and Wilbur C, born in May, 1855. Mr. 
Linsley was again married, September 22, 

1880, taking for his second wife Sarah E. , 
daughter of Samuel Smith, of South Britain. 
Wilbur C. Linsley married Minnie Smith, 
of Woodbury, by whom he had one son, James 
L. ; and after her death he married Kate 
Phinney, of Towanda, Penn., who bore him 
four children: Jessie P., Sarah, Malcolm, and 
Catherine. He and his family live in a 
house built for him by his father on a lot ad- 
joining the parental home. 

Politically a Republican, Mr. James H. 
Linsley represented the town in the legisla- 
ture in 1879 and 1887. He has been a Dea- 
con of the First Congregational Church in 
Woodbury and Treasurer of the society 
twenty-nine years. For forty-five years he 
has been a member of the choir, of which 
he was leader seventeen years; and his pro- 



232 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ficiency in music has caused a demand for his 
services as a singer on various public occa- 
sions. 



Y^EBBEUS J. WELCH, a thriving and 
IJT industrious farmer of Cornwall and a 
"^— ^ veteran of the Civil War, vi'as born 
in Warren, Conn., March 12, 1835, son of 
Jason and Sarah (Bright) Welch. His first 
ancestor in this country was Thomas Welch, 
a native of Wales, who emigrated from that 
country to America. His son Paul, Mr. 
Welch's great-grandfather, followed the sea, 
and was engaged as a trader for some years 
between Bridgeport, Conn., and the West 
Indies. He subsequently settled in New Mil- 
ford, Conn., where he engaged in mercantile 
business, and was the first merchant in that 
town. His children were: David, John, 
Abner, Nathan, Jephthah, Irene, and Harriet. 
John Welch, grandfather of L. J. Welch, was 
born in New Milford, Conn., and followed the 
trade of a carpenter. He was a soldier in the 
Revolutionary War, and at the close of his 
military experience took up his residence in 
Warren, Conn. He lived to reach the age of 
eighty-three years. He married Rispah Page, 
a native of Litchfield; and they reared two 
children: Jason and Lois. Mrs. John Welch 
died at the age of sixty-six years. Jason 
Welch, father of our special subject, was born 
in Warren, and was a lifelong resident of that 
town. He adopted agriculture as an occupa- 
tion, and, being energetic and industrious, 
achieved a fair degree of success. He lived 
to be eighty-seven years old. His wife, Sarah 
Bright, daughter of Shores Bright, a native of 
New Jersey, became the mother of eight chil- 
dren; namely, Henriett, David, Noah, Evi, 
Antoinette, Teresia, Lebbeus J., and Mary. 

Lebbeus J. Welch, after attending the 
schools of his native town, commenced busi- 



ness life as a clerk, but subsequently relin- 
quished mercantile pursuits for farming. 
During the Civil War he served as a private 
in Company K, Second Regiment Heavy 
Artillery, Connecticut Volunteers. After 
receiving an honorable discharge, he laid 
down his gun, and once more took up the 
plough, in 1887 settling on a farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres, situated in the 
eastern part of the town of Cornwall, where 
he has since resided. On November 10, 1864, 
Mr. Welch was united in marriage to Cathe- 
rine C. Williams, daughter of William R. 
and Julia A. (Holsapple) Williams, residents 
of West Winsted, Conn. Mr. and Mrs. 
Welch are the parents of eight children, 
namely: Fanny M. ; Jason W. R. ; Katie M.; 
Lelia Ann; Belle J. and John Buel, twins; 
Paul L.; and Warren Andrews. Mr. Welch 
is a member of St. Andrew's Lodge, No. 64, 
A. F. & A. M., and a comrade of Gregory 
Post, No. 59, Grand Army of the Republic. 




^ \ISS MARY PHELPS, an intelli- 
gent and cultured woman, re- 
_ spected and beloved by old and 
young, resides in a pleasant old house, facing 
Litchfield Common. This house, in which 
she was born, and which has been kept in ex- 
cellent repair, is one of the oldest in the lo- 
cality, and is one of the landmarks of the 
town, having been erected in 1782. It has 
been in the possession of the Lewis family 
since 1812, when it was bought by Luke 
Lewis, the grandfather of Miss Phelps. 

Henry Phelps, father of Miss Phelps, was 
born in Simsbury, Hartford County, in 1800, 
son of Noah L. Phelps, also a native of Sims- 
bury. Jonathan Phelps, father of Noah and 
great-grandfather of Miss Phelps, was born 
and reared in Westfield, Mass., after which 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



233 



he lived in Simsbury for a few years. He as- 
sisted in clearing some of Connecticut's land 
from its vast forests, and was afterward a 
brave soldier in the French and Indian War. 
He subsequently removed to Swanzey, but re- 
turned to Simsbury before his death, which 
occurred at a ripe old age. His son Noah 
was reared in Simsbury, and spent a few years 
of his early life in Farmington. Here he 
subsequently purchased a tavern, and engaged 
in the hotel business, living there until his 
demise, in 1861. 

Henry Phelps grew to man's estate in 
Farmington, and there embarked in a mercan- 
tile career, getting a good start. He subse- 
quently opened a store for general merchan- 
dise in Litchfield, established a prosperous 
trade, and became one of the leading mer- 
chants of the place. A few years prior to his 
decease he gave up active business, living re- 
tired until summoned to his eternal rest, in 
1868. He married Louisa Lewis, a daughter 
of Luke Lewis, who was a native of Goshen. 
Nehemiah Lewis, the grandfather of Luke 
and maternal great -great-grandfather of Miss 
Phelps, was one of the original settlers of 
Goshen. His son William, the next in line 
of descent, was a lifelong resident of that 
place, and there reared his family. 

■Luke Lewis came to Litchfield from the 
place of his nativity when a young man, and 
established the first drug store in this local- 
ity. He had a successful business for many 
years before his death, which occurred in 
1839. He was closely identified with local 
affairs, and was widely and favorably known 
throughout this section of Litchfield County. 
In 18 1 2 he bought the house now owned and 
occupied by his grand-daughter, Miss Phelps, 
as above stated. He reared a family of five 
daughters, of whom Louisa, who became the 
wife of Henry Phelps, was the only one to 



marry. Of the children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Phelps, only Mary reached maturity. The 
mother survived her husband many years, 
dying in 1889, at the venerable age of eighty- 
seven years. Like her ancestors, she was 
a devoted member of the Congregational 
church. Both she and her husband when 
quite young united with that organization, and 
were firm believers in the tenets of that de- 
nomination. When the infirmities of age 
began to tell upon her native strength, her 
eyes growing dim and her steps feeble, she 
was tenderly cared for by her daughter Mary, 
who sought to anticipate her every want. 
Miss Phelps is a worthy representative of both 
the Lewis and Phelps families, and is highly 
esteemed throughout the community. 




EV. FATHER P. DUGGAN, pas- 
tor of St. Francis Church of Torring- 
ton, is a native of County Tip- 
perary, Ireland, born in the year 1847 His 
father, Denis Duggan, was a lifelong resi- 
dent of said county, where he belonged to 
the sturdy farming class so characteristic- of 
Tipperary. 

Father Duggan was reared and educated in 
his native isle, and, after leaving the national 
schools, completed his studies at St. Patrick's 
College in Thurles, being ordained in the 
cathedral of that place in 1874. Emigrating 
to this country, he was appointed assistant at 
St. John's Church in the town of Middlesex, 
where he remained two years. During the 
succeeding three years Father Duggan was at 
the Waterbury Church of the Immaculate 
Conception, under the Rev. Lawrence Welch. 
Then in 1879 he was assigned to his present 
pastorate. At that time his congregation, 
which numbered only nine hundred souls, 
worshipped in a small, dilapidated building, 



234 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



occupying the site of the present parsonage. 
He put forth his most strenuous efforts to 
raise money enough to erect a church and 
suitable buildings. The result was that in 
1885 he was able to purchase from Miss Coe 
the lot now occupied by the school and from 
Miss Saxford the site of the present fine 
church. The latter edifice was completed in 
1887, and is a model of architectural beauty, 
being one of the finest structures in the 
county. It is none too large for the congre- 
gation, which now numbers twenty-four hun- 
dred souls. 

Father Duggan's labors, however, did not 
cease with the erection of the church. In 
1888 he built the parsonage connected with 
it. In 1 891 he had the convent erected, and 
two years later saw the completion and equip- 
ment of the beautiful school building, after 
the most approved modern plans. This 
school is imder the charge of ten religious 
si.sters, who give instruction to five hundred 
pupils in the branches taught in the public 
schools, fitting them for the high school. 
The pastor's object in providing this school 
for his people is to bring together the differ- 
ent nationalities of the place, the German, 
French, Italian, Hungarian, Pole, Slav, and 
Thuringian, to blend them in a homogeneous 
mass, and to so instruct the pupils as to make 
each a worthy citizen and a loyal supporter of 
the United States government. In pursuance 
of this purpose Father Duggan infuses into 
the minds of his pupils a love of the prin- 
ciples of American liberty, realizing that 
upon this as a corner-stone will rest the great 
future of America. He requires not only that 
the pupils shall be regular in their attendance 
and diligent in their studies, but also that 
they shall be true to the higher instincts of 
their nature. He is of the opinion that no 
young man can afford to be handicapped by 



his own folly; that in his efforts to gain a 
higher position for himself he cannot afford to 
lose his chances by anything leading to dissi- 
pation; that the great stumbling-block to be 
shunned is strong drink; and that manhood, 
diligence, and self-control are the groundwork 
of success in life. 

In all of his works Father Duggan is an 
earnest and tireless laborer. He is ably as- 
sisted in his duties by the Rev. Edward 
Brennan. In 1890 he travelled extensively 
in Europe, and studied the social, civil, and 
religious questions, his object being to in- 
form himself upon these matters as an aid 
to his parish work. He proudly speaks of 
America as his country by adoption, and says 
that no country surpasses it, and that no 
grander people than the Americans are to be 
found on the face of the earth. 




RCHIBALD McLEISH, a leading 
citizen of Falls Village, Salisbury, 
foreman in the car-shops of the 
New Haven Railroad in that place, was born 
in Charleston, Scotland, April 28, I858, son 
of Robert and Elizabeth (Mason) McLeish. 
His grandfather, whose name also was Robert 
McLeish, was a printer in Scotland; and his 
father, Robert, Jr., was in the service of .the 
government twenty-two years, serving as clerk 
in the army. The latter was subsequently in 
the employ of the North Bridge Railroad 
seventeen years. The mother of Mr. Mc- 
Leish, who was a daughter of Joseph Mason, 
came to America in 1882, and is now in her 
seventy-third year. She and her husband 
reared six children; namely, Alexander, 
Archibald, Robert, Ellen, Margaret, and 
Elizabeth. 

Archibald McLeish learned the carpenter's 
trade in Scotland, acquiring the thoroughness 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



235 



and nicety of execution peculiar to expert 
workmen. Coming to America in 1880, he 
first found work as a car-builder at Norwood, 
Mass. Subsequently he was seven years in 
the employ of the New York & New England 
Railroad at that place, and in 1887 he went to 
work for the New Haven road. In this em- 
ployment he gave so much satisfaction that in 
time he was made foreman. He got charge of 
the car department in the Falls Village works 
in 1893, and up to the present time has filled 
the position in a satisfactory manner. 

In 1882 Mr. McLeish was united in mar- 
riage with Ellen Stewart, daughter of David 
Stewart, of Dumferline, Scotland. Four 
children have blessed their union; namely, 
Robert, David, Alexander, and Florence. 

In politics Mr. McLeish is Republican. 
He is advanced in Masonry, being a member 
of Orient Lodge of Norwood, Mass., A. F. 
& A. M., and also of Phoenix Lodge, No. 79, 
of New Haven, Conn. He also belongs to 
the Order of United Workmen. 



W: 



ILLIAM STANLEY BALDWIN, 
a representative business man of 
New Milford, was born in New 
York City,. April 25, 1831, son of Stanley S. 
and Harriet (Stevens) Baldwin. Mr. Bald- 
win's grandfather, Joel Baldwin, was a native 
of Brookfield, Conn., and a cooper by trade. 
He was also engaged in agriculture as well as 
coopering, and enjoyed a fair degree of pros- 
perity. He was a land-owner, and conducted 
a large farm situated upon Long Meadow 
Hill. In his latter years he engaged in the 
grain business. His children by his first 
marriage were: Polly, Stanley Sanford, Sam- 
uel, and Minerva; by his second marriage, 
Catherine, Thomas, Mary Anne, George, 
Edwin, Herriot, and Henry. Stanley S. 



Baldwin, Mr. Baldwin's father, learned the 
trade of manufacturing jewelry in New Haven, 
and later established himself in business at 
4 Franklin Square, New York City, where he 
conducted a prosperous business until his 
death, which took place when he was thirty- 
four years old. He was a supporter of the 
Whig party in politics, and was a membes of 
the Congregational church. His wife, Har- 
riet Stevens, became the mother of one son : 
William Stanley, the subject of this sketch. 
She afterward became the wife of Almon 
Hallock, of Gaylordsville. 

William Stanley Baldwin has resided for 
the most part in New Milford since reaching 
the age of four years; and he received his ed- 
ucation in the schools of that town and in 
Brooklyn, N.Y. He early engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits, and for six years after his 
marriage conducted farming with his step- 
father in Gaylordsville. In 1862 he became 
financially interested in a patent pump, which 
proved a profitable* investment; and he carried 
on business in that line in New Milford for 
several years. He is now engaged in the 
grocery business with his son-in-law. In 
1863 he purchased the A. B. Mygat property 
on East Street, which he has improved and 
beautified by setting out fruit trees, grading 
and laying out the grounds into lawns and 
walks, and remodelling the house. 

On October 18, 1853, Mr. Baldwin was 
united in marriage to Betsey Potter, who was 
born July 20, 1830, daughter of James A. 
and Phebe (Gelston) Potter. Her father was 
a prosperous farmer and extensive horse dealer 
of Albion, N.Y., who after a busy and suc- 
cessful career finally retired from active busi- 
ness pursuits. He reared a family of seven 
children, namely: Clark; Maltby; Betsey, 
who is now Mrs. Baldwin; George; Henry; 
James; and Phebe. 



236 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin have three children, 
namely: Alice G., who was born June 11, 
1855; Nellie L., born December 3, 1858; 
and Harriet P., born January 25, 1868. 
Alice G. Baldwin married George H. Jack- 
son, and has one daughter, named Cornelia 
Baldwin. Mr. Jackson is an enterprising 
grocer of New Milford, which is his native 
town. He is a son of Charles W. and Laura 
M. (Hine) Jackson. His father, who was a 
farmer and brick-maker, enlisted in 1862 as 
a private in Company H, Second Regiment, 
Connecticut Heavy Artillery, and was killed 
in the battle of Cold Harbor. Nellie L. 
Baldwin married Harry Ives, son of Henry 
and Lucy T. (Yale) Ives. Her husband is 
engaged in the paper box business in New 
Milford. Harriet P. Baldwin married Will- 
iam H. Percy, ticket agent and operator at 
the New Milford station, and has one son, 
named Stanley Baldwin. 

Mr. William S. Baldwin is a Republican in 
politics. He and his wife and daughters are 
members of the Congregational church, the 
family taking an active part in church work. 



DfREI 



REDERICK N. WOODRUFF, whose 
J^l, home is situated in the South District 
of Watertown, one and a half miles 
from the village, was born March- 30, 1812, 
on the farm he now occupies, his parents 
being Nathaniel and Esther (Hungerford) 
Woodruff. His great-grandfather, John 
Woodruff, a native and lifelong resident of 
Milford, Conn., was of English ancestry. 
Captain John Woodruff, son of the elder John, 
moved from Milford to Watertown after his 
marriage, and finally settled upon the estate 
which is now owned by his grandson, Freder- 
ick N. He applied himself sedulously to 
agricultural labors for a number of years, dur- 



ing which time he improved his property into 
a good farm, and died at the age of seventy 
years. 

Nathaniel was the youngest of the family of 
eight children born to Captain Woodruff and 
his wife. He was reared at the homestead, 
which he succeeded to the possession of after 
his father's death. He continued to improve 
the property, cultivating the land successfully 
and erecting the present residence. He died 
at the age of eighty-five. He was a Democrat 
in politics, taking an active part in local pub- 
lic affairs; and he served with ability as a 
member of the Board of Selectmen and as 
Justice of the Peace. He was twice married, 
his first wife, Esther Hungerford, being a 
daughter of Deacon Jonas Hungerford, a rep- 
resentative of one of the oldest families in 
Watertown. She became the mother of five 
children, of whom two are now living, 
namely: Frederick N., the subject of this 
sketch; and Lydia Ann, widow of Charles 
Bidwell. Mrs. Esther H. Woodruff died at 
the age of fifty years. Both parents attended 
the Congregational church. 

Frederick N. Woodruff was educated in the 
district and select schools of Watertown, and 
at an early age he began to assist in attend- 
ing to the farm duties at home. He became 
proficient in all branches of agriculture, and 
managed the farm during his father's declin- 
ing years, finally inheriting the homestead. 
His land, consisting of one hundred acres, is 
well located and in a good state of cultiva- 
tion; and he has always carried on general 
farming with prosperous results, his crops 
being large and of a superior quality. 

On September 21, 1842, Mr. Woodruff mar- 
ried his first wife, Nancy E. Tolles, daughter 
of Sheldon Tolles, of Woodbury. She died 
aged fifty-six, having been the mother of one 
child, who died at the age of seven years; and 




FREDERICK N. WOODRUFF. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



239 



he wedded for his second wife Martha A. 
Beardslee, daughter of D. M. Beardslee,, of 
Watertown. 

Mr. Woodruff is a supporter of the Demo- 
cratic party, and has rendered valuable service 
to the town as a member of the School Beard. 
He is a member of the Congregational church, 
with which he has been actively connected for 
many years, and has served upon the various 
committees. He assisted in the establish- 
ment of a mission at Oakville, where he acted 
as superintendent of the Sunday-school ; and, 
although he has reached the advanced age of 
eighty-three years, he still retains sufficient 
vigor to enable him to continue in church 
work. He is possessed of a high order of in- 
telligence, has been a great reader, and is 
well informed upon all important questions 
of the day. He has lived an industrious and 
useful life, and has always enjoyed the re- 
spect and esteem of his fellow-townsmen. 

A portrait of this venerable citizen will be 
recognized on another page. 



(T' 



EORGE S. DUNNING, a general 
merchant of East Canaan, Litchfield 
County, Conn., was born in that 
town, July 19, 1859, son of Lyman and Isa- 
bella (Holcomb) Dunning. Mr. Dunning' s 
great-grandfather, Edmund Dunning, who 
lived to the advanced age of ninety-two years, 
was a resident of Canaan; and Hawley Dun- 
ning, Mr. Dunning's grandfather, was born 
here, and followed farming, also conducting a 
tannery in the building which is now oc- 
cupied by the subject of this sketch as a 
store. His wife, who died aged fifty-six, was 
the mother of two children, namely: Lyman; 
and Ellen, who became Mrs. Holcomb. 
Lyman Dunning was born in East Canaan, 
and was reared to farm life, which he followed 



until reaching the age of twenty-eight years. 
He then engaged in mercantile pursuits in 
his native town, where he continued to carry 
on business until 1889, when he sold the 
store to his son, George S., and is now liv- 
ing in retirement at the age of sixty-four 
years. He was twice married. His first 
wife, Isabella Holcomb, who died at the age 
of thirty-three years, was the mother of four 
children: Celia (deceased); George S., 
whose name appears at the head of this 
sketch; Ellen; ind Belle. For his second 
wife Lyman Dunning married Esther Stevens 
Rood. 

George S. Dunning passed his boyhood on 
the old Dunning homestead, which has been 
in possession of the family for four genera- 
tions. He was educated in the schools of his 
native town, and at the age of twenty-six went 
to Manning, la., where for three years he was * 
engaged in general mercantile business. He 
then returned to East Canaan, and in 1889, 
as elsewhere stated, purchased his father's 
business, which he has since conducted with 
prosperous results. In 1887 Mr. Dunning 
was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Clark, 
daughter of Nelson Clark, of Canaan. Mr. 
Dunning is a Republican in politics, and has 
served as a member of the School Board. 



OSHUA A. BOLLES, editor of the 
New Milford Gazette and a writer on a 
variety of topics, is one of the leading 
citizens of New Milford, and a native of 
Waterford, Conn., where his birth occurred on 
May 26, 1856. He is a son of Joshua and 
Theresa A. J. (Wheeler) Bolles, his father 
having been a well-known book publisher. 

During his active business career Joshua 
Bolles was associated with his brothers in a 
book store and publishing business at New 



240 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



London, Conn. The firm compiled and issued 
the Bolles Dictionary and the Bolles Sjjelling- 
book. Joshua Bolles died in 1857, two years 
after his marriage, when he was but forty-nine 
years old. His wife, Theresa A. J. Wheeler 
Bolles, is now living at the age of sixty-seven 
years. Their only child is Joshua A., of this 
sketch. 

Joshua A. Bolles spent his boyhood in the 
old seaport town of New London, Conn., and 
was graduated from the Bulkeley School. He 
afterward entered Amherst 'College, but on 
account of severe illness was unable to remain 
long. At twenty years of age he began his 
career as a newspaper man in the office of the 
New York Mail, which was then edited by the 
late Major Bundy. He received valuable 
training from William Henry Forman, the lit- 
erary editor, also from Colonel Clifford 
Thompson, a well-known New York journalist. 
Mr. Bolles subsequently learned to set type in 
the office of the New London Telegram, and 
after that went to Great Barrington, Mass., 
where he was employed by Clark W. Bryan to 
write for the Berkshire Courier, the Paper 
World, and other publications of Clark W. 
Bryan & Co. From Great Barrington, in com- 
pany with Mr. F. H. Giddings, he came to 
New Milford, where they purchased and edited 
the Gazette. Mr. Giddings retired after a 
year, and Mr. Bolles has since conducted the 
paper alone and has brought it into the front 
rank of country newspapers. 

In 1 891 he erected a three-story block, the 
first floor of which he rents for a grocery store, 
and the third for a photographic studio; the 
second is devoted to his newspaper and job 
printing business, for which work he has a 
thorough equipment of fine machinery and 
presses, which are run by means of power fur- 
nished by a nine-horse boiler and a four-horse 
steam-engine. Mr. Bolles has contributed 



many stories to the Boston Bicdget, Belford's 
Magarsine, Frank Leslie' s Popular Monthly, 
the Yankee Blade, and other publications. 
Two of his essays read before the Connecticut 
Editorial Association, entitled "The Country 
Editor of To-day" and "Country Journalism 
as an Art," have attracted special notice. 

On September 15, 1887, Mr. Bolles was 
united in marriage with Miss Ella S. Irwin, a 
daughter of Robert Irwin. They are the par- 
ents of one daughter, Gertrude E., born 
December 19, 1888. The family reside on 
Bridge Street, where Mr. Bolles owns a pleas- 
ant home centrally located. 



^TJDWARD COWLES, of Woodbury, one- 
Jpl of the leading manufacturers of Litch- 
field County, was born in Bethlehem, 
Conn., September 19, 1829, son of David .M. 
and Alma (Merriam) Cowles. His grandfather 
also, Levi Cowles, who was born in Bethlehem 
and there spent his life on a farm, died in 
1 813, at the age of forty-six. The wife of 
Levi, whose maiden name was Rachel Rumney, 
died in 1835, in her sixty-seventh year. The 
couple reared several children ; namely, Truman, 
John, Betsey, Albert, Althea, Edward, Maria, 
Sarah, David M., Susan, and Wealthy. 

David M. Cowles, father of Edward Cowles, 
was born in Bethlehem, Conn., March 5, 1805. 
After his father's death he took charge of the 
homestead, and engaged in general farming, 
gradually buying more land until he owned 
four hundred acres in the eastern part of the 
town. He dealt largely in cattle, going West 
and North to trade. He owned stock in differ- 
ent manufacturing enterprises, buying cau- 
tiously at first, and gradually increasing his 
inve,stments until he was one of the wealthiest 
men in the county. He first became inter- 
ested in the American Shears Manufactory, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



241 



buying several shares of the stock. Subse- 
quently, with his son, the subject of this 
sketch, he gained control of the whole enter- 
prise, which has since reached mammoth pro- 
portions under the management of the younger 
man. Politically a Republican, he was a 
prominent factor in the town government, act- 
ing as Selectman and in other official capaci- 
ties. He died January 17, 1886. On No- 
vember 27, 1828, he was married to Alma, 
daughter of Oliver Merriam, of Watertown, 
who died January 18, 1873. She was the 
mother of the following children : Edward, 
whose name heads this article; Oliver, born 
June 15, 1831, who died November 15, 1833; 
Oliver, born April 24, 1833; David, born Sep- 
tember 4, 1835; Wealthy, born February 11, 
1838; Horace, born January 9, 1841 ; Truman, 
born February 14, 1844; and Mary J., born 
July 3, 1846. 

Edward Cowles received his early education 
in the schools of his native town. He assisted 
his father in the care of the farm and the cat- 
tle until he attained his majority, and then 
purchased a farm for himself, which he man- 
aged seven years. After that he moved to 
Woodbury, and located in Hotchkissville, be- 
coming Secretary and Treasurer of the Ameri- 
can Shears Company, in which he and his 
father were stockholders. This company was 
organized in 1852, and Mr. Cowles was Secre- 
tary and Treasurer until 1886, when he and 
his father bought up all the stock; and he be- 
came President, becoming sole manager after 
his father's death. The business has greatly 
increased within the past ten years, and now 
gives employment to one hundred and twenty- 
five hands, turning out annually three thousand 
different kinds of knives, besides many kinds 
of scissors and shears. Stock is imported for 
the handles of tbe knives, comprising pearl, 
tortoise shell, horn, cocoa wood, ebony, and 



other fine materials. The blades are wholly 
made of Sheffield plate steel. He has many 
machines of the latest pattern for cutting and 
finishing; and he has a fine water power, and 
also a fifty-horse power engine for special pur- 
poses. Each knife goes through several dif- 
ferent hands before it is finished. Mr. Cowles 
finds market for his goods all through the 
United States, sending them as far west as 
California. His manufactory occupies several 
buildings, ranging from two to three stories 
high ; and he owns several tenement houses, 
besides a fine residence in Woodbury. In 
1895 he bought the Young house in Wood- 
bury, which he remodelled; and, beautifying 
the grounds and erecting a new barn, he trans- 
formed the whole into one of the handsomest 
pieces of residential property in the county. 

On April 21, 1858, he was married to 
Esther A., daughter of Charles C. Hatch, of 
Bridgewater, Conn. She was born October 
20, 1833, and died January 18, 1893, leaving 
three children — Julius H., Emogene A., and 
Caroline L. Julius H., who was born Septem- 
ber 19, 1859, is in company with his father, 
and is superintendent of the works. He mar- 
ried Mrs. Sarah Smith, who had by her former 
marriage one son, Edward H., now adopted by 
her husband. Julius Cowles has one daughter 
living, Gladys E., and has lost three children. 
Caroline L. Cowles, who was born December 
23, 1864, is an artist, wife of Arthur Wright, 
who also is an artist. Emogene A., born July 
8, 1862, resides in California. Edward 
Cowles was again married November 19, 1894, 
his bride being Fannie M., daughter of James 
and Caroline (Capewell) Stone, of Woodbury. 
James Stone, who was a son of Sheldon Moses 
and Ursula (Gillette) Stone, was born in 
Woodbury, December 10, 1836. In early life 
he was a carpenter and contractor, and later he 
was successfully engaged in the bakery busi- 



242 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ness. He died at the age of fifty-eight. His 
wife, who was a daughter of George A. and 
Harriet (Davis) Capewell, lives with her 
daughter, Mrs. Cowles. They reared the fol- 
lowing children: Mary E., born November 25, 
1859, who was first married to Frank Root, 
and after his death became the wife of Samuel 
Root; Henry J., who died in childhood; Ellen 
L., born October 30, 1862, wife of Lewis 
Dawson; Fanny M. 5 born April 8, 1866, wife 
of our subject; and George S. , born September 
12, 1872. In politics Mr. Cowles is a stanch 
Republican. He is an esteemed member of 
the Episcopal church, to which his wife also 
' belongs. 



bfRAT 



RANK J. IvILBORN, an enterprising 
[jlj, miller of Washington, was born in 
Litchfield, May 22, 1850, son of 
Jeremiah and Rachel C. (Westover) Kilborn. 
Mr. Kilborn's grandfather, Putnam Kilborn, 
was a native and a lifelong resident of Litch- 
field. He followed agriculture prosperously 
during his active period, and died at the age 
of seventy-two years. He married Catherine 
Freeman, and reared a family of seven chil- 
dren; namely, Hiram G., Jeremiah, Rollin 
F., Hobart, Abigail, Clarissa, and Charles. 
The grandmother lived to reach the age of 
seventy-two. 

Jeremiah Kilborn, Mr. Kilborn's father, 
was born in Litchfield. He learned the trade 
of a blacksmith, an occupation which he fol- 
lowed industriously until he lost his sight. 
This, together with other physical disabilities, 
caused his retirement from active labor. He 
died at the age of thirty-two years. His wife, 
Rachel (Westover) Kilborn, was a daughter of 
John Westover, of Litchfield ; and she became 
the mother of two children, namely: David 
P., who married Lucy J. Hatch, of New Mil- 
ford, Conn.; and Frank J., the subject of 



this sketch. The mother still survives at the 
age of seventy-one years. 

Frank J. Kilborn received his education in 
the schools of his native town. At the age of 
seventeen he commenced to learn the trade of 
a stone-cutter. He also acquired the mason's 
trade, and afterward followed these occupations 
for twenty years. In 1889 he moved to Wash- 
ington, and, purchasing his present property, 
engaged in the milling business, which he has 
since prosperously followed. His mill is run 
by three wheels combined, giving ninety-horse 
power, which is ample for his present needs. 
Besides milling a large amount of flour and 
grain, in which he has built up a thriving 
trade, he grinds about eight hundred bushels 
of rye annually. He also makes a specialty 
of producing cider of a superior quality, at the 
rate of about one thousand barrels each season. 
He conducts business on a liberal and progres- 
sive scale, and his energy and ability are pro- 
ducing the most satisfactory returns for his 
investment. In politics he is a Democrat; 
and, although his business monopolizes the 
major part of his time, he has served the town 
as first Selectman with ability for two years. 

In 1872 Mr. Kilborn was united in marriage 
to Julia A. Jordan, daughter of Timothy C. 
Jordan. They have two children, namely: 
Wilbur T., who married Agnes P. Lofland, 
and has one child; and Harry G., who died 
October 27, 1895. He is well advanced in 
Masonry, having been Master of Rising Sun 
Lodge, No. 27, a member of Meridian Chap- 
ter, No. 15, Royal Arch Masons and Tyrian 
Council Royal and Select Masters, and of 
Clark Commandery, No. 7, Knights Templars. 
As a citizen and a business man, Mr. Kilborn 
in highly esteemed by a large circle of friends 
and acquaintances, who appreciate his various 
commendable traits of character and true 
worth. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



243 




HOMAS H. BROWN, a highly intel- 
ligent and respected business man of 
Thomaston, where he is engaged in 
the tea and coffee and crockery business, and 
also follows the vocation of an undertaker, 
was born in Plymouth, Conn., March 17, 1857, 
son of Thomas and Mary (Brown) Brown. 
Patrick Brown, the grandfather of Thomas H., 
was born in Ireland, of Irish parentage. His 
life was sper^t in that country, where he fol- 
lowed the occupation of a farmer. 

His son, Thomas Brown, who was also a na- 
tive of Ireland, was brought up in the calling 
of his father, and received his education in 
that country. At the age of twenty years he 
came to this country, where upon his arrival 
he settled in Plymouth, Conn. He went to 
work as a carriage-painter in the large carriage 
factory which was then located in that town, 
and was there employed for several years. He 
next secured a position with the Seth Thomas 
Clock Company, remaining with them until 
within five years of his death, which occurred 
in 1893, in the sixty-third year of his age. 
His wife, who, though bearing the same sur- 
name as himself, was not a relative, was of 
Irish descent, and the daughter of James 
Brown, who spent his life in Ireland as a 
farmer. She bore her husband seven children, 
of whom five are now living, namely : Thomas 
H., the subject of thfs sketch; Joseph J., re- 
siding at South Norwalk, where he has charge 
of a restaurant; Katy, employed in her 
brother's store; Maggie, a successful dress- 
maker; and Mary, who is employed in the 
ofifice of the Seth Thomas Clock Company. 
Their mother died in April, 1891, sixty-one 
years of age. Both parents were consistent 
members of the Catholic church, the daughters 
being members of the choir. 

Thomas H. Brown remained with his par- 
ents during his early years, and acquired a 



good common and high school education. He 
then secured a position with the Seth Thomas 
Clock Company, and continued in their employ 
for nine years. At the expiration of that time 
he entered into business for himself; and since 
April, 1883, he has conducted a constantly 
increasing trade, winning by his upright deal- 
ings the respect and friendship of those with 
whom he comes in daily contact. He carries 
a complete line of teas and coffees and an ex- 
cellent assortment of crockery and glass ware, 
being the only merchant in Thomaston to make 
a specialty of these lines. In 1893 he added 
to his other business that of an undertaker, the 
serious duties of which he is well qualified to 
perform. 

His political views are those of a stanch 
Democrat. He has served two years on the 
Board of Assessors, and has been a member of 
the Board of Relief. Fraternally, he is a 
member of the Ancient Order of Foresters, 
being Treasurer of his court, of the Ancient 
Order of Hibernians, and of the Knights of 
Columbus. He is a member of the Fire De- 
partment, and Treasurer of the Crescent Flose 
Company. In his religious belief he is a 
Catholic, and a communicant of St. Thomas 
Church. 

"ON. GUY C. FORD, of Washing- 
ton, who is Judge of Probate and 
holds other important positions, was 
born on the Ford homestead in Washington, 
September 3, 1826, son of Captain Simeon and 
Mary (Fenn) Ford. The first representative 
of the Ford family in Washington was Samuel, 
the great-grandfather of Mr. Guy C. Ford. 
Samuel Ford was born in Old Milford, and 
settled in Washington at an early date. He 
fought for independence in the Revolution, 
bravely undergoing the trials and privations 
that fell to the lot of the sturdy soldiers of 




244 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the Continental army. His son Samuel, the 
grandfather of Mr. Ford, was also a native of 
Old Milford. He moved to Washington with 
his father, and spent his life there in the calm 
avocations of a farmer. He died in 1841, at 
the age of seventy-one years. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Betsey Piatt, was a daughter 
of Samuel Piatt, who also was a Revolutionary 
soldier. Mrs. Ford died at the age of seventy- 
five, laying down the burdens of life in 1850. 
They had but one son, Simeon. 

Captain Simeon Ford, born in Washington 
in 1800, was content to follow in the footsteps 
of his father, tilling the paternal acres up to 
the time of his death, which occurred in 1871. 
His wife, who was the daughter of Gershom 
Fenn, a farmer of Washington, lived to be 
eighty-eight years old, passing from life in 
1 891. Simeon and Mary (Fenn) Ford reared 
the following children: Guy C, the siibject of 
this sketch; Isabella, who died at the age of 
seven years; Frances H., who married John 
Woodruff, and has one child, Addie H. ; and 
Isabella B. , who married Ray T. Kipp. 

Guy C. Ford has also devoted a good part of 
his life to agriculture, tilling the farm which 
supported his father and grandfather. How- 
ever, being a man of unusual ability, he has 
been called to fill various official positions of 
responsibility, political and otherwise. His 
services are in frequent demand to settle es- 
tates, He has been a Justice of the Peace 
since 1856, and was appointed Judge of Pro- 
bate in 1891. He was elected to the legisla- 
ture on the Republican ticket in 1855, 1887, 
and 1891, serving in 1887 as Chairman of the 
Committee on Constitutional Revision, and in 
1889 as a member of the Educational Com- 
mittee. 

In i860 Judge Ford was united in marriage 
with CeliaJ., daughter of Samuel and Sarah 
(Canfield) Nettleton. Mrs. Ford died in 



1884, in her fifty-seventh year, leaving one 
daughter, Ellen A., who is married to C. I. 
Parsley, and has one son, Anthony R. Judge 
Ford occupies a prominent place in Masonic 
circles, being First Past Master of Rising Sun 
Lodge, No. 27, A. F. & A. M., of Washing- 
ton, a member of Darius Chapter, No. 16, 
and of Buell Council of Litchfield. He also 
belongs to Washington Grange, No. 10. In 
religious matters he favors the Episcopal 
church, having been Warden and Lay Reader 
for alternate Sundays for nearly thirty years. 




pjENJAMIN F. LAMPPIIER, a prom- 
'''^A inent farmer of Goshen, Conn., son 
of George and Elizabeth B. (Robin- 
son) Lamphier, was born in this town, Febru- 
ary 20, 1836. Mr. Lamphier' s father, who 
was a native of Rhode Island, settled in 
Goshen at the age of twenty years, and here 
followed agriculture during the active period 
of his life. He owned a good farm, upon 
which he made various improvements, and was 
an industrious and highly respected member of 
the community. He died at the age of eighty- 
two years. His wife, Elizabeth B. Robinson, 
who was a daughter of Thomas Robinson, of 
Stonington, Conn., became the mother of six 
children. The following is a brief record of 
the family : Elizabeth Lamphier became Mrs. 
George H. Crandal ; George W. married Emily 
Richardson, and reared five children— Ed- 
ward P., Emily E^., George W., Origin S., and 
Alfred; Joseph married Elvira Clemens, and 
reared six children — Arthur G., Lydia E., 
Minnie J., Burton, Frederick, and Eugene; 
Homer died at the age of eighteen; Benjamin 
F. is further spoken of in the paragraph below ; 
Lucretia died aged twenty-two years. Mrs. 
George Lamphier lived to reach the advanced 
age of ninety years. 




B. F. LAMPHIER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



247 



Benjamin F. Lamphier attended the district 
schools of his native town, and was reared to 
farm life. He has always resided at the home- 
stead, which consists of one hundred and sixty 
acres of well-improved land ; and he has man- 
aged his property. with a degree of success that 
can only be attained through industry and a 
thorough practical knowledge of the principles 
and processes of agriculture. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics; and, although he has always 
closely applied himself to his legitimate occu- 
pation, he has found time to take part in pub- 
lic affairs, in which he has been called upon 
to serve in various responsible positions of im- 
portance. He has filled the offices of Consta- 
ble and Collector with ability, and in 1881 
was elected to represent his town in the State 
legislature, in which capacity he rendered effi- 
cient service to the community whose interests 
were intrusted to his charge. 

On November 3, 1858, Mr. Lamphier was 
united in marriage to Jerusha M. Howe, who 
was born in Canaan, May 21, 1839. Her 
father, Lyman Howe, who was a prosperous 
farmer of Canaan, Conn., died at the age of 
fifty-seven years. He and his wife, Jerusha 
Lowery Howe, reared a family of five children. 
The first, Erastus L., married Esther Bradley, 
and has one daughter, named Fanny, who is 
married and has four children — Clinton E., 
Minnie E., Maude L., and Mabel. The sec- 
ond, Olive, is the wife of William W. Millard, 
of Canaan, and has three children — Fitch, 
who married Nettie Sardham ; Mary, who mar- 
ried William Marsh, and has four children — 
Charles, John, Ray, and William L., who 
married Mary Marsh, of Cornwall. The third, 
Henry, married Mary Merwin, and has six 
children — Elizabeth, Lyman, Sarah, Harriet, 
Julia, and Emma. The fourth was Jerusha. 
The fifth was Elisha, who died aged eighteen 
years. The mother died aged thirty-seven years. 



Mr. and Mrs. Lamphier have four children, 
namely: George Lyman, born July 4, 1865; 
Ada Lucretia and Ida Jerusha, twins, born 
August 20, 1868; and Elizabeth Olive, born 
January 20, 1871. George Lyman Lamphier 
fitted for college at Phillips Academy, An- 
dover, Mass., taking both scientific and classi- 
cal courses, was graduated at Yale in the class 
of 1889, and has since been successfully en- 
gaged in educational work. His first field of 
labor was at Winton College, Columbus, Ga. 
Obliged to return North at the end of the year 
on account of ill-health, he was principal of the 
West Winsted High School for the next four 
years. He then resigned, and went to South 
Hadley, Mass., remaining there until called to 
Pepperell, Middlesex County, Mass., where he 
now holds a position as superintendent of 
schools. He was married on June 22, 1889, 
to Louise Davis. Their two children are: 
Louise Lyman Lamphier, born July 18, 1892; 
and Edward George Lamphier, born February 
27, 1894. 

Ida Jerusha Lamphier was married April 
18, 1889, to Willis M. Hurlburt, who was born 
at Cornwall Hollow, September 7, 1868. 
They have three children: Ruth Minnie, born 
January 23, 1890; Mark, born June 15, 1891 ; 
and Roy Benjamin, born September 23, 1893. 
Ada Lucretia Lamphier was married March 
25, 1890, to Allyn H. Vaill, a native of 
Goshen, born May 23, 1870. They have two 
children: Edna Rebecca Vaill, born August 
13, 1892; and Robert Lamphier Vaill, born 
April 16, 1893. Elizabeth Olive Lamphier 
was married March 14, 1894, to William H. 
Harrison, formerly of Waterloo, la., who was 
born at Cornwall Hollow, Conn., February 23, 
1873. Mr. and Mrs. Lamphier attend the 
Congregational church. A portrait of Mr. 
Lamphier occupies another page of this 
volume. 



248 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



(sTVLBERT S. PEARSALL, a resident 
t^ of Hotchkissville, Woodbury town- 
^ "V._^ ship, was born in Bronxville, West- 
chester County, N. Y., August i, 1853. 
James Pearsall, the grandfather of Albert 
Pearsall, was also a native of Westchester. 
He was a piano-maker by trade, and both he 
and his wife lived fourscore years. They left 
three sons, one of whom, Jarvis Pearsall, was 
the father of Albert S. 

Jarvis Pearsall was born in Nyack, N.Y. 
He became in after years a resident of Kings- 
bridge, N. v., where he learned the trades of 
blacksmith and carriage-maker. To these 
branches of industry, after putting up a trip- 
hammer, he added the making of wagon axles. 
He finally established himself in Bronxville, 
N. Y., where he died. Both his wife, who 
was Catherine Cole before marriage, and him- 
self died young, though the exact ages are not 
known. A family of six small children were 
thus left to face the difficult problem of life 
without parental protection. These children 
were: John H., James C, William, David C, 
Catherine, and Albert S. John H., who 
fought in the late Civil War, married Mary 
Valentine, and died at twenty-five years of 
age, leaving one child, John. James C, who 
also served in the late war, is a cooper, living 
in Sing Sing, N.Y., married to Kate Davis, 
and the father of two children — Kate and Jar- 
vis. David C. likewise served in the war, 
and Catherine died young. 

The life-story of a man or woman who has 
unusual odds to fight against, and has yet main- 
tained an honorable name, is always full of 
interest to other strugglers. In reviewing the 
life of Albert S. Pearsall, one finds encourage- 
ment and example. Left an orphan when of 
tender years, he was taken by a Mr. Pease, who 
cared for him until an elder brother claimed 
the privilege of becoming the child's protec- 



tor. He was now sent to school, but very 
soon after this second adoption he was again 
left utterly alone by this brother's death. 
The boy secured work in the knife factory at 
Bronxville, where he became by care and in- 
dustry a skilled workman. In 1876 he was 
sufficient of an adept in his trade to venture 
elsewhere, so he came to Hotchkissville, 
where he found employment in the American 
Knife and Shears Company. So competent a 
workman did he show himself to be that in 
time he became a foreman in the grinding and 
finishing department, a situation he held until 
1893. At this time he exchanged factory 
work for the lighter duties of a head clerkship 
in the store of Mr. G. F. Morris, of Hotch- 
kissville. In this position he has gained the 
esteem of his employer and the merited com- 
mendation of his friends. On the 25th of 
June, 1874, Mr. Pearsall obtained the dearest 
wish of his heart by becoming united in mar- 
riage to Miss Ellen E. Garrity. Her parents, 
James and Ellen Garrity, were residents of 
Roxbury township, where the father cultivated 
a farm. Mr. Pearsall is a Republican in poli- 
tics, and is a member of the Congregational 
church. 




^ENJAMIN TREAT, of the firm of 
Treat & Starr, large dry-goods mer- 
chants in New Milford, was born in 
Bridgewater, July 17, 1823, son of Joseph C. 
and Lucy (Gorham) Treat, and grandson of 
Abijah and Abigail (Canfield) Treat. 

His first paternal ancestor in this country 
was Governor Robert Treat, who was born 
in England in 162 1. He came to America 
when hardly more than a boy, resided for a 
time in Wethersfield, Conn., and removed to 
Milford in his eighteenth year, thereby becom- 
ing one of the first settlers in that town. In 
1670 he was appointed Major of the Connecti- 



/ 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



249 



cut troops, and three years later was advanced 
to the rank of Colonel. He served in the 
Indian war.. In 1674 he was elected Deputy 
Governor, and in 1683 he became Governor, 
and for fifteen years was re-elected annually, 
after which he declined to serve further. His 
son, Lieutenant Joseph Treat, was one of the 
original land-owners of New Milford; and his 
grandson, a son of Joseph Treat, Jr., and the 
great-grandfather of Benjamin Treat, was the 
first of the family to settle in New Milford, 
although the portion of the town in which he 
settled is now known as Bridgewater. He was 
a large land-owner, and was successfully en- 
gaged in agriculture. He died at eighty years 
of age. His wife, Phoebe Hawley, bore him 
ten children. Of these, Abijah turned his at- 
tention to farming ; and at his parents' death he 
purchased- the old homestead. He lived to be 
seventy-six years old ; and his wife, nh Abi- 
gail (Canfield) Treat, attained the age of 
eighty-two years. 

Joseph C, born in Bridgewater, August 11, 
1783, was one of the five children of Abijah 
Treat. "When he started in life for himself, he 
purchased a farm, on'which he erected a new 
house and barns. He was profitably engaged 
in general farming throughout his life, and 
died at the age of sixty-nine years. His wife 
reared him eight children; namely, Madison 
A., Royal, Sarah A., Mary A., Daniel, Jo- 
seph Eli, Benjamin, and Arza. She lived 
but forty-five years. 

After Benjamin Treat attained his majority, 
he purchased the old home, and followed agri- 
cultural occupations until 1861, when he re- 
moved to Brookfield, Conn., where he engaged 
in the milling business during the following 
ten years. He then came to New Milford, and 
purchased the store built by his brother, 
Joseph Eli, who was one of the first to en- 
gage in mercantile business in New Milford. 



For fourteen years he carried on a thriving 
trade in dry goods and hardware ; and then, in 
1885, he formed an equal partnership with 
George Emmons. Two years afterward he 
bought out his partner's interest ; and, dropping 
the sale of hardware, he refitted his store, and 
put in a more complete line of dry goods, so 
that he now has one of the best stores of that 
description in the county. In 1887 he sold a 
half-interest to Edward W. Starr; and the 
business has since been conducted under the 
firm title of Treat & Starr, although on ac- 
count of ill-health Mr. Treat is now only a 
silent partner. 

On December 11, 1851, he was joined in 
marriage with -Miss Betsey Ruggles, of Brook- 
field. She died in 1872, thirty-nine years of 
age, leaving one daughter, Susan O. , now the 
wife of H. S. Beers, an undertaker of Middle- 
town, Conn. Mr. Treat afterward formed a 
second union with Mrs. Mary A. Alvord, a 
daughter of Nickerson and Elizabeth S. (Lev- 
erich) Millis. She was the widow of John 
J. M. Alvord, who died when but forty-two 
years old, leaving three daughters, as follows : 
Eva E., the wife of William Jenning; Delia 
M., who married J. Harris; and Ida C, the 
wife of William Stilson. Her parents were 
born in Virginia ; but the later years of their 
lives were spent in New York City and at 
Oswego, N.Y., where her father followed the 
business of a shoe merchant. Mr. and Mrs. 
Millis had ten children; namely, Mary A., 
John L., William N., Ellison (deceased), 
Elizabeth, Ellison D., Lysander T., Joseph, 
Louisa, and Charles D. Mrs. Millis was a 
great-grand-daughter of General Provost, of 
Revolutionary fame. 

Mr. Treat is a stanch Republican; and 
while a resident of Bridgewater he served in 
town office, but since he has lived in New 
Milford his time has been too fully occupied 



250 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



to admit of his accepting ofificial positions. 
Pie resides in his pleasant home on Grove 
Street, which he purchased when he came to 
New Milford. The house was built by the 
Rev. A. Elliott in 1812. Since he bought 
the place, he has been to considerable expense 
in improving it, building a new barn, filling 
in and making a terraced lawn, and setting out 
shade and fruit trees, so that he now has a 
very attractive place. 



Y^YMAN L. CLARK, a well-known car- 
IJT penter and builder of Washington, was 
'^'— . -^ born in Torrington, Conn., October 
5, 1819, son of Joel and Candis (Bown) Clark. 
Mr. Clark's father was born near Simsbury, 
Conn., and was a farmer by occupation. He 
passed his latter years in Torrington, and died 
at the age of sixty-five. His wife, Candis 
Bown, of Torrington, became the mother of 
ten children, as follows: Emily, who is now 
Mrs. Apley, and has three children — Diantha, 
Sherman, and Julia; Mary, who became Mrs. 
Hill, and has six children — Fred, Frances, 
Julia, Melvin, Catlin, and Sidney; Lyman L., 
the subject of this sketch; Marilla, who is 
now Mrs. Woodruff, and has one son, Walter ; 
Sidney, who married Miss Johnson; Truman 
P., who married Jane Tibbies, and has two 
children — Abbie, Luella; Sabra; Henry ; Ed- 
win, who married Mary Pendleton; and Amelia, 
who is now Mrs. Harris. The mother died at 
the age of sixty-five years. 

Lyman L. Clark was educated in the schools 
of Torrington, and at an early age began to 
contribute toward his own support. When 
nineteen, he commenced to learn the trade of a 
carpenter and joiner, which has been his occu- 
pation through life. He followed his trade in 
Torrington for fifteen years ; but for the past 
thirty-five years he has resided in Washington, 



where he has conducted extensive business 
operations. He has had charge of the con- 
struction of many of the largest and most 
prominent residences in this vicinity, which is 
sufficient indication of the confidence felt in 
his ability and trustworthiness. He has for 
several years made a specialty of turning out 
mantels and fireplaces, in the construction of 
which he has displayed much original talent. 
In 1854 Mr. Clark was united in marriage to 
Elizabeth F. Gibson, daughter of Brindsmade 
Gibson, of Washington, and has two children, 
namely: Edward G. , who married Anna M. 
North, and has two children ^ — Fred N. and 
Russell F. ; and Sarah A. Mrs. Clark died 
in 1889, aged seventy years. Mr. Clark is a 
Democrat in politics, and attends the Congre- 
gational church. 



(HThec 



HEODORE JUDSON, a progressive 
q J\ and successful business man in the 
town of Woodbury, where he was born, 
March 25, 181 8, belongs to a family which has 
lived in Connecticut since his first American 
progenitor settled in this State, in 1639. Mr. 
Judson is eighth in lineal descent from Will- 
iam Judson, who came from Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, in 1634, and, after living four years in 
Concord, Mass., moved to Stratford, Conn., 
and thence to New Haven. William Judson 
brought with him to the New World three sons 
— Joseph, Jeremiah, and Joshua. 

Mr. Theodore Judson is of the lineage of 
Joseph, the eldest son. Joseph's son John, 
who married Elizabeth Chapman, was born in 
Stratford, Conn., December 2, 1647, and in 
1672 was one of the signers of the Funda- 
mental Articles for the settlement of Wood- 
bury, whither he came with the first company 
of pioneers. He took up a tract of unbroken 
land, which has remained in possession of his 




THEODORE JUDSON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



253 



name and blood to the present time. John 
Judson's estate was small, and the wild land 
was difficult to cultivate; but by dint of ener- 
getic and untiring effort he at last established 
a home. His habitation, which was built of 
heavy timbers, after the good old fashion of 
those days, was one of the first frame buildings 
erected in the town. Here he died at sixty- 
two years of age. His son, John, Jr., married 
Sarah Beers, and was the father of a third 
John, whose wife Sarah bore him a son and 
namesake. John, fourth, married Martha 
Camp. He died in 1808, aged sixty-two. His 
wife died in 1834, at the age of ninety-three. 
Their children were: John and Phineas, the 
former of whom became the father of Mr. 
Theodore Judson. John Judson, the fifth of 
the name, inherited the old homestead. He 
extended the boundaries of his domain by pur- 
chasing more land, and improved his property 
by building new barns and keeping it in good 
order. Discovering that the soil he owned 
was a peculiarly fine quality of clay, he estab- 
lished a brick yard, which proved a profitable 
venture. The bricks made of this clay were 
very durable, and some of his make are still in 
use. Mr. John Judson was prominent in local 
politics, representing his county in the legis- 
lature in 1835-40; and his death was a blow 
to the Democratic party, to which he had 
always stanchly adhered. He was a communi- 
cant of the Episcopal church, and was a man 
of influence in religion as well as political 
circles. He died on the 14th of August, 
1849, aged seventy-one years. His wife, 
Jerusha, who was a daughter of Abijah Mitch- 
ell, was born August 4, 1785, and died on 
May 20, 1845. The children of this union 
were: Betsey C. ; Antoinette; Phineas A.; 
John A. ; Theodore, whose name stands at the 
head of this sketch ; Martha E. ; and Frank- 
lin M. 



Theodore Judson,- after leaving school, de- 
voted himself to home interests, and continued 
manufacturing bricks until 1862. In 1854 he 
took down the old house, and built a large, 
handsome mansion, made after his own design 
and of his own brick. He also remodelled the 
other buildings on the place, and thus rehabili- 
tated the old homestead. In 1852 he married 
Miss Julia Mariah Colton. This lady, who 
was a daughter of Benjamin and Jerusha W. 
(Porter) Colton, was born March 2, 1819. 
Mrs. Judson's father, Benjamin Colton, was 
an early settler in Woodbury Centife, where he 
was engaged, as a dealer in general merchan- 
dise. He died in 1850, aged fifty-seven. 
Mrs. Colton' s maternal grandfather was Per- 
point Porter. Her mother died at the early 
age of twenty-seven. 

Although Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Judson 
have never had children born to them, they 
early took into their home four little ones, 
who have enjoyed all the love, care, and pro- 
tection that parents bestow. Julia, Harriett, 
Augusta, and Frederick are the fortunate chil- 
dren of this generous, large-hearted couple. 
Mr. Judson, like his father, is a strong Demo- 
crat. He has held office of Selectman for five 
years. The happily mated husband and wife 
are both in the communion of the Episcopal 
church. 

The accompanying portrait will be recog- 
nized and appreciated by the neighbors and 
friends of Mr. Judson as a very good likeness 
of this excellent representative of an old Colo-, 
nial family. 

RANK H. LEE, M.D., a practising 
physician of Canaan, was born in Shef- 
field, Mass., July 17, 1862, son of Seth 
and Mary (Lee) Lee. Dr. Lee is a descend- 
ant of John Lee, who emigrated from England 
about the year 1645, and was one of the 



^54 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



founders of the New England colony. Dr. 
Lee's grandfather was Dennis Lee, a native 
of Farmington, Conn., where he was engaged 
in agricultural pursuits throughout his life. 
He died at the age of eighty-five years. His 
wife was Caroline Squire; and she became the 
mother of five children; namely, Seth, Curtis, 
Earl, Jennie, and Fanny. Dr. Lee's grand- 
mother still survives at the age of eighty-one. 
Seth Lee, father of our subject, was born in 
Sheffield, Mass., and has all his life remained 
a resident of that town. He adopted agricult- 
ure as an occupation, and became a prosperous 
farmer. His wife, Mary Lee, was the mother 
of four children, whose names follow: Frank 
H., the subject of this sketch; Alice A.; 
Caroline B. ; and M. Luella. 

Frank H. Lee acquired the foundation of 
his education in the common and high schools 
of his native town. After graduating from 
the high school, he began the study of 
medicine with Dr. H. H. Smith. He com- 
pleted his preliminary studies with Dr. F. L. 
Smith, and entered the Albany Medical Col- 
lege, from which he was graduated with honor 
in 1888, receiving a prize for a complete 
report of the surgical clinics at the Albany 
Hospital. Dr. Lee was a student with Dr. A. 
Vanderveer, and had exceptional opportunities 
for obtaining a practical knowledge of his pro- 
fession. Upon completing his medical course. 
Dr. Lee commenced practice in Canaan, where 
he has since acquired an excellent reputation 
as a skilful and reliable practitioner, the 
demand for his services steadily increasing. 
He is medical examiner for several life insur- 
ance companies, including the Traveller's of 
Hartford and the Washington of New York. 
His practice extends over a wide section, and 
he has a large number of patients in the adja- 
cent towns. In November, 1890, Dr. Lee 
was united in marriage to Ada Strong, daugh- 



ter of George Strong, of Canaan. He is a 
representative of one of the oldest New Eng- 
land families, and is a gentleman possessing 
many intellectual attainments. Dr. Lee is a 
member of both the County and the State 
Medical Societies. 



/^TeORGE S. LYMAN, who owns and 
Vj5j^ manages a productive farm in War- 
ren, was born in Glastonbury, Conn., 
August 30, 1817, son of Dr. Norman and Eu- 
nice (Smith) Lyman. Mr. Lyman's grandpar- 
ents, David and Mary (Brown) Lyman, were 
residents of New Hartford, Conn., where 
David Lyman was for many years an industri- 
ous miller. They both lived to reach an ad- 
vanced age, and their children were : Orange, 
David, John, Daniel, Elijah, Norman, Sam- 
uel, and Mary. Norman Lyman was born in 
New Hartford, and was educated for the medi- 
cal profession. He first settled in Glaston- 
bury, Conn., where he ably practised his 
profession for fifteen years, removing then to 
Warren, in which place he was similarly en- 
gaged for the rest of his life. He was a skil- 
ful physician and a useful citizen, possessing 
the esteem and confidence of the entire commu- 
nity. His death occurred when he was sixty- 
two years old. His wife, Eunice Smith, 
daughter of Eli Smith, of Litchfield, became 
the mother of seven children, as follows: Sid- 
ney; Mary; George S., the subject of this 
sketch ; Edward ; Jonathan ; Mary (second) ; 
and Eunice. Mrs. Dr. Lyman, like her hus- 
band, died at the age of sixty-two. 

George S. Lyman passed his boyhood and 
youth in Warren, and received his education in 
the common schools of that town. After com- 
pleting his studies, he taught school for four 
terms, and then engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits, which has since been his occupation. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



255 




He owns two hundred and seventy-five acres of 
well-improved land, upon which he conducts 
general fanning, carrying into the exercise of 
his calling those essential qualities of fore- 
thought, energy, and thrift that characterize 
the typical New England farmer. 

In 1840 Mr. Lyman was united in marriage 
to Mary Sackett, daughter of Justus Sackett, 
of Warren. She died aged seventy-five years, 
leaving two children, namely: Eunice, who is 
the widow of Orlando P. Kingman, and has 
two children — Edward and Marion; and Ed- 
ward. Mr. Lyman is a Republican in poli- 
tics, and in religious views a Congrega- 
tionalist. 

«i^»»» 

^^^RS. HARRIET W. FORBES, an 
esteemed resident of Woodbury 
_ and widow of the late Mr. Loren 
Forbes, is the daughter of Guy and Nancy 
(Lum) Walker. She belongs to a family 
whose history is connected with the settlement 
of the provinces and the city of Boston. 
Mrs. Forbes' s earliest American ancestor was 
Robert Walker, born about 1606, and a resi- 
dent of Boston until 1684. His son, the Rev. 
Zechariah Walker, had a pastorate in Jamaica, 
Long Island, from 1663 to 1668. He received 
ordination in the Presbysterian church, and 
became pastor of the Second Church in Strat- 
ford on the isth of May, 1670. Parson Zech- 
ariah and his wife, Susannah Walker, had a 
son, who bore his father's name and was a 
Deacon in the church. The second Zechariah 
married Elizabeth Bull. Their son, Peter, 
was wedded to Rhoda Sherman. To Peter and 
Rhoda Walker was born a son, whom they 
named Peter, and who married Miss Annis 
Minor. Peter and Annis Walker were the 
parents of Guy, born in 1788, the father of 
Mrs. Forbes. 

Mr. Guy Walker, who was a carpenter by 



trade, left his native place in 1824, and mi- 
grated to Florida. Here, on a plantation two 
miles from St. Augustine, he settled with his 
family; but about fifteen months after, find- 
ing the climate unhealthy, he moved to 
Charleston, S. C. , finally becoming a resident 
of Baltimore, Md., where he lived for four 
years. Here he died in 1829, leaving a widow 
and six children. Mrs. Walker returned to 
Woodbury after her husband's death, bringing 
her daughter, the one child living, with her. 
The children were: John C. , who died young; 
Charles B. , who was drowned off the coast of 
Florida; Mary S. , who died in Baltimore; 
Harriet, of whom this sketch is written ; Laura, 
who also died during their sojourn in Balti- 
more ; and Jane, who died in her fourth year. 
Harriet Walker was united in marriage to 
Loren Forbes, of Woodbury, Conn., April 21, 
1844. Mr. Forbes was energetic and industri- 
ous from his boyhood. At fifteen years of age 
he was employed on the farm of Mr. Asa Minor, 
remaining until he attained his majority. He 
then was engaged by Mr. Noah Benedict, farm- 
ing for him until 1844, the year of his mar- 
riage, after which he hired his employer's farm 
for seventeen years. He then purchased the 
estate known as the Morris farm, upon which 
his widow now resides. This tract of land is 
located in Hazel Plain, District No. 9, of 
Woodbury. Mr. Forbes was a cattle dealer as 
well as farmer, and was accustomed to driving 
his herds to the markets of New York, New 
Haven, and Boston. After some years he 
turned his whole attention to agriculture. He 
was a member of the First Congregational 
Church, with which he connected himself in 
1831. He was a Republican, and during his 
life his neighbors showed their esteem for 
him by intrusting to him sundry town ofifices. 
Mrs. Forbes was left a widow on the i6th of 
January, 1883, her husband having lived to the 



2s6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



good old age of seventy-six years. A son and 
daughter blessed their union. They were : 
Mary W. , born February 8, 1845, who is a 
teacher; and William, whose birth occurred 
October 18, 1851. The latter is a brick and 
stone mason and a stone-carver by trade. 
Though bereaved of the companion of her ear- 
lier years, Mrs. Forbes has still the interests 
of her children's lives to solace her. As she 
still lives at the homestead, she is surrounded 
by the treasured associations of her wedded 
life. 



TI^OBERT W. IRWIN, a thriving young 
I ^^ farmer of the town of Washington, 
J-^ V , _ V was born in Liverpool, England, 
February 4, 1864, son of John and Catherine 
(Allwell) Irwin. Mr. Irwin's father, who 
was a native of Ireland, went to Liverpool, 
where he resided during the remainder of his 
life. His wife, Catherine Allwell, was a 
daughter of Grant Allwell. Their children 
were : Andrew, who married Sarah Hegnot ; 
Crayton ; James; Sarah, who became Mrs. 
Marshall; and Robert W. , whose name heads 
this sketch. John Irwin died at the age of 
fifty-five years, and his wife at forty years. 
Robert W. Irwin passed his early years in 
England. At the age of fourteen he came to 
the United States, and settled in the town of 
Washington, this county. He engaged in 
■farming, which he prosecuted with vigor, hav- 
ing in view the establishment at some day of 
a home of his own. By the exercise of dili- 
gence and thrift he has been able to attain his 
modest ambition, and now owns a finely located 
and well-improved farm. In 1888 Mr. Irwin 
was united in marriage to Sophia Siessenbyt- 
tle, daughter of Andrew Siessenbyttle, of New 
York City. Mr. Irwin is a Republican in 
politics. In his religious views he is a 
Congregationalist. 



tALPH L 
formerl) 
_^the n( 



CRISSEY, who owns and 
formerly operated a granite quarry in 
northern part of the town of 
Norfolk, Conn., was born in this town, Febru- 
ary 4, 1833, son of Benjamin W. and Eunice 
(Burr) Crissey. His paternal grandfather, 
Israel Crissey, a native of Woodbury, Conn., 
whose birth occurred on March 31, 1764, first 
settled in Colebrook, but subsequently moved 
to Norfolk. He was married February 7, 
1788, to Alice Woodruff, daughter of Heze- 
kiah Woodruff, of Colebrook ; and they became 
the parents of four children, namely: Mehit- 
able, who was born July 21, 1789, married 
Seth Barbour, and died September 8, 1830; 
Benjamin W. ; Alice, born June 15, 1793, 
died September 3, 1861 ; and Olive, who was 
born February 28, 1795, became the second 
wife of Seth Barbour, and died February 3, 
1865. Israel Crissey died at his home in Nor- 
folk, December 6, 1833; and his wife, April 
24, 1834. 

Benjamin W. Crissey, father of our direct 
subject, was born May 19, 1791. He was 
trained to farm work, inherited part of his 
father's estate, and, becoming a prosperous 
farmer and dealer in stock, added to his landed 
possessions until he owned over four hundred 
acres. He belonged to the Agricultural Soci- 
ety, and was prominent in town politics, serv- 
ing at different times in nearly all the local 
offices. He was also an active and valued mem- 
ber of the Congregational church. His death 
took place on October 28, 1864. His wife, 
Eunice Burr, whom he married March 4, 
1828, was born January 14, 1797. She was the 
mother of four children : Warren, born March 5, 
1 831; Ralph I., whose name appears at the 
head of this sketch; Olive E., born April 6, 
1835; and Theron W., born April i, 1837. 
Mrs. Eunice B. Crissey died February 8, 
1882. 




RALPH I. CRISSEY. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



259 



Ralph I. Crissey was trained to agriculture, 
and remained at home with his parents until 
their death. He then entered the employ of 
the Barnum Richardson Company, with whom 
he remained for twenty-five years. At the pres- 
ent time, besides his other business, he owns 
and conducts a farm of two hundred acres. 
He is a true blue Republican in politics, and 
cast his first Presidential vote for General 
Fremont, the "Pathfinder." He has served 
his town with credit as Selectman, Assessor, 
and as Justice of the Peace. He also repre- 
sented his district in the legislature in 1867 
and again in 1883. He is a member of West- 
ern Star Lodge, No. 37, A. F. & A. M. 

Mr. Crissey was married on June 6, 1861, 
to Cornelia Seymour, daughter of Samuel Sey- 
mour. She was born April 18, 1834, and died 
March 26, 1866, leaving two children, namely: 
Isabella, Mrs. Winthrop Cone, born April 21, 
1863; and Cornelia, born March 21, 1866, 
who died March 8, 1883. On August 29, 
1 87 1, Mr. Crissey married Mrs. Prudence 
(Murray) Curtiss, who died August 30, 1881, 
without issue. Mr. Crissey's third wife is 
Mary E. Buell, daughter of H. G. Buell, a 
well-known iron manufacturer of Colchester, 
Conn. By this union there are no children. 
Mr. Crissey is a member of the Congregational 
church, and the family is one highly esteemed 
in Norfolk and the vicinity. 

The portrait placed opposite the beginning of 
the foregoing sketch will be recognized as a 
good likeness of the gentleman whose name it 
bears, Mr. Ralph I. Crissey. 




EORGE F. PRITCPIARD, a well- 
5l' known blacksmith of Watertown and 
an ex-member of the legislature, was 
born August 17, 1838, son of Benjamin and 
Mary (Pritchard) Pritchard. Mr. Pritchard's 



great-grandfather, Benjamin Pritchard, was an 
early settler in Waterbury, Conn., where he 
followed the blacksmith's trade with success 
until his death, which took place when he was 
forty-six years old. His son Asher, Mr. 
Pritchard's grandfather, was a native of Water- 
bury. He followed his father's calling in the 
town of his birth, and subsequently in Water- 
town, to which place he moved in 1820. He 
reared a family of five children, three sons and 
two daughters, and lived to the advanced age 
of ninety-two years. 

Benjamin Pritchard, Mr. Pritchard's father, 
was born in Waterbury, and learned the black- 
smith's trade from his father in Watertown. 
He engaged in business for himself in Water- 
bury, later returning and joining with his 
father upon the site now occupied by his son 
in Watertown. He died at the age of seventy- 
three years. His wife, who was a daughter of 
Isaac Pritchard, a prosperous farmer of Water- 
bury, became the mother of four children, of 
whom George ¥., the subject of this sketch, is 
the only survivor. She died in Watertown, 
aged twenty-nine years. Both parents were 
Episcopalians, as were their ancestors -for 
many generations. 

George F. Pritchard supplemented the edu- 
cation he received in the common schools by a 
course at the Watertown Academy. His boy- 
hood and youth were passed with his grand- 
father, of whom he acquired the blacksmith's 
trade. At the age of twenty-two he went to 
Oakville, where for two years he was employed 
as a forger in a machine shop. In 1865 he re- 
turned to Watertown, and engaged in business 
at his present location, where he has since 
continued with prosperity, and is now the old- 
est and best known ^workman in his locality. 
He is a Democrat in politics, and has long 
been a leading spirit in local public affairs, 
serving with ability as Collector, for three 



26o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



years as a member of the School Board, and in 
1889 and 1890 he represented his town in the 
legislature. He is a member of Federal 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Watertown, in 
which he has held all the ofifices, having been 
its Master for two years and Treasurer for sev- 
eral years. 

Mr. Pritchard has been twice married. In 
1870 he first married Esther Jackson, daughter 
of William Jackson, a well-to-do farmer of 
Bethlehem. She died at the age of thirty- 
one; and he wedded in 1885, for his second 
wife, Elizabeth, a sister of his first wife. 
Mr. Pritchard enjoys a wide reputation as an 
intelligent, upright, and useful citizen and a 
public official who has served the town faith- 
fully and with credit. He actively supports 
the Episcopalian church, of which he is a 
Vestryman. 

^AMES GUERNSEY CURTJSS, one 
of the leading farmers of Woodbury, 
was born on the old Curtiss homestead, 
opposite his present residence, August 8, 
1835. His parents were David H. and Anna 
(Guernsey) Curtiss. William Curtiss, the ear- 
liest known ancestor, came from London in 
1632, and settled in Scituate, Mass. David 
Stiles and Sybil (Huntington) Curtiss were 
the grandparents of the subject of this sketch. 
David H. Curtiss was born in 1796, on the 
old homestead. At the age of sixteen he be- 
came a teacher, in which profession he was 
engaged for thirteen years. In the course of 
time he bought out the other heirs to the old 
Curtiss farm. To this he added more land, 
until there were about three hundred acres. 
On it he conducted general farming in accord- 
ance with the most enlightened principles. 

Mr. Curtiss was twice married. Maria 
(Summers) Curtiss, his first wife, died while 
a young woman, leaving no children. Anna 



(Guernsey) Curtiss, the second wife, had four 
children, as follows: a son, who died in in- 
fancy ; Maria, who died at the age of two and 
a half years; James G. ; and David Curtiss. 

James Guernsey Curtiss inherited the part 
of his father's farm on which he now lives. 
Since taking possession of it, he has remod- 
elled the buildings and made many other 
improvements. 

In politics Mr. Curtiss is a Republican. 
He has been Selectman for two terms, and he 
has also served on the Board of Relief. In 
1877 he represented the town in the legisla- 
ture. He is a man of progressive ideas. 

On May 17, i860, he was united in mar- 
riage to Mary J. Stiles, daughter of Henry B. 
and Patty (Seeley) Stiles. Flenry B. was a 
son of Benjamin Stiles. Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
B. Stiles had three children : Mary J., Ellen, 
and Alice. Mrs. James Guernsey Curtiss died 
in September, 1893, at the age of- sixty, leav- 
ing seven children. These are: Henry, who 
owns an adjoining farm, married to Frances 
Eyre; Anna S., married to D. L. Somers; 
Nellie, who married Harry Barnes, lives in 
Watertown, and has two children — Edna and 
Merritt; James G., a teamster, married to 
Alma Bassett, who lives in Ansonia, and has 
one child, James G. ; Flora, who married 
Lyman W. Garrington, lives in Ansonia, and 
has lost two children; George S., who died 
young; and Eva M. Curtiss, who died at the 
age of nine. Mr. Curtiss is a member of the 
Episcopal church, to which his wife also be- 
longed prior to her death. 



OHN CHAPIN BRINSMADE, prin- 
cipal of the Gunnery, a noted school 
in Washington, Conn., was born in 
Springfield, Mass., April 24, 1852, son of 
William B. and Charlotte (Chapin) Brins- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



261 



made. On the paternal side he is descended 
from the Rev. Daniel Brinsmade, who, gradu- 
ating from Yale College in 1745, settled in 
Washington in the latter part of the eigh- 
teenth century, and acted for many years as 
pastor of the Judea Congregational church. 
His son Daniel, who also was a graduate of 
Yale, with the class of 1772, was a promi- 
nent man in the district and a member of the 
State Convention for the ratification of the 
Constitution of the United States. 

William B. Brinsmade, the father of the 
subject of this sketch, likewise claimed Yale 
as his Alma Mater, graduating from that in- 
stitution in 1840. He was a man of unusual 
intelligence and executive ability, and was for 
a long time superintendent of the Connecticut 
Railroad. His wife was a daughter of Colo- 
nel Harvey Chapin, a descendant in the 
sixth generation of Deacon Samuel Chapin, 
who settled in Springfield in 1642. 

John Chapin Brinsmade attended the 
schools of Springfield, took a course of study 
at the Gunnery, and graduated from Harvard 
in 1874. In the fall of 1874 he became as- 
sistant teacher at the Gunnery, and in 1881, 
on the death of the principal, took full charge 
of the school. It is one of the finest insti- 
tutions in the county. With a campus com- 
prising twenty acres, it is beautifully situated 
in Washington village. Many distinguished 
men have studied within its walls, as evi- 
denced by the presence on its rolls of names 
well known throughout the country. This 
school Mr. Gunn conducted successfully up 
to the time of his death, and it has lost 
none of its prestige since his son-in-law has 
assumed the management. 

In 1876 Mr. Brinsmade was united in mar- 
riage with Mary G. Gunn, daughter of F. W. 
Gunn, the founder of the Gunnery. The 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Brinsmade has been 



brightened by seven children, namely: Fred- 
erick G. ; William, who died in his eleventh 
year; Chapin; Eleanor; Mary; John C, Jr.; 
and Charlotte B. In politics Mr. Brinsmade 
is a Republican. He is not an aspirant for 
office, but creditably represented his district 
in the legislature of 1892. In religious be- 
lief Mr. and Mrs. Brinsmade are Congrega- 
tionalists. 



(sTrNSON H. SQUIRES, an extensive 
t^ farmer of the Merryall District in 
■^^ '^ V^ the town of New Milford, and for- 
merly a member of the Connecticut legisla- 
ture, was born upon the farm he now owns 
and occupies, September 9, 1846, son of John 
N. and Lucy (Segar) Squires. Mr. Squires's 
great-grandfather, Thomas Squires, who was 
a native of Fairfield, Conn., followed the sea 
as master of a trading-vessel. While at the 
Island of St. Bartholomew he died of yellow 
fever, leaving with a wife his son Anson, 
grandfather of Mr. Squires. The widow set- 
tled in Marble Dale, this county, where she 
became the wife of Joseph Smith; and Anson 
Squires at the age of seven years went to live 
with John Morehouse. At the age of fifteen 
he commenced to learn the carpenter's trade, 
which he followed as an occupation for many 
years; and, being industrious and possessed 
of good judgment, he became successful. He 
invested in real estate, and built and operated 
a distillery, employing a large number of men 
in his business enterprises, and at the time of 
his death owned eleven hundred acres of land, 
situated in the northern part of New Milford. 
He was a Whig in politics, serving in many 
of the town offices, and was a liberal, public- 
spirited man. He died March 11, 1873. He 
married Barbara Lyon, and reared a family of 
five children, as follows: Lucy M., born 
April 24, 181 7: Samuel E., born May 15, 



262 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1819; John M., born November 11, 1823; 
George S., born August 27, 1831; and Mary 
A., born June 29, 1833. The mother died 
March 10, 1873, and the father on the follow- 
ing day. They were buried together in one 
grave. Both were Episcopalians in their re- 
ligious belief. 

John M. Squires, Mr. Squires's father, 
adopted agriculture as an occupation, and in 
early manhood purchased the Kenney prop- 
erty, which adjoins the farm where he now re- 
sides. After improving it to some extent, 
he sold it, and bought his present property. 
The buildings, having been destroyed by fire, 
were rebuilt in 1S82. Besides farming suc- 
cessfully, he has dealt quite extensively in 
real estate, and is at the present time the 
owner of several pieces of valuable farm prop- 
erty. He has also been a prominent cattle 
dealer in that district, and gives consider- 
able attention to dairying. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics, has been a Justice of the 
Peace, and rendered good service to the town 
during the two terms he served it as a mem- 
ber of the Board of Selectmen. His wife, 
Lucy (Segar) Squires, whom he married Octo- 
ber 3, 1842, was a daughter of Heman Segar. 
She became the mother of three children, 
namely: Anson H., the subject of this sketch; 
Henry, who resides at home; and Hattie, wife 
of E. A. Peet. The mother died in 1892. 

Anson H. Squires commenced his education 
in the district schools of New Milford, and 
completed his studies at the Bridgeport Busi- 
ness College. At the age of twenty-one he 
went to reside with his grandparents. He 
conducted their farm during their latter years, 
and succeeded to its ownership at their death. 
It contains two hundred acres of land, and is 
desirable for its healthy location and pictur- 
esque surroundings. Mr. Squires has im- 
proved the property by remodelling the old 



buildings and erecting new ones. He has 
been a large and successful tobacco raiser, 
and at the present time owns a valuable farm 
in the town of Kent. 

On November 7, 1867, Mr. Squires was 
united in marriage to Alice M. Barton, 
daughter of Edward P. and Melissa J. 
(Worthy) Barton. Mr. Barton, who was born 
in Stamford, N.Y., August 14, 1819, had 
been in business as a merchant until 1875, 
when he bought a farm of two hundred and 
fifty acres, situated in the town of New Mil- 
ford. His wife, who was born April 26, 
1820, is the mother of three children; 
namely, Edwin L., Alice M., and Mary E. 
Mr. and Mrs. Squires have one son, named 
Charles A., who was born October 24, 1873, 
and resides at home. 

Mr. Squires is a Democrat in politics, was 
a member of the Connecticut House of Repre- 
sentatives during the years 1883, 1891, and 
1893, and in 1895 was elected Selectman. 




iRS. ADELAIDE NORTHROP, of 
Roxbury, widow of the late An- 
drew Northrop is a daughter of 
Elisha A. and Maria (Peck) Weller. She is 
descended from Thomas and Elizabeth Weller, 
who emigrated from England, and settled at 
what is now called Weller's Bridge, in the 
town of Roxbury. Thomas Weller, who in 
due course became a large farmer and land- 
owner, built a house upon rising ground just 
north of the present Weller homestead, and is 
supposed to have attained an advanced age. 
His wife, who died September 18, 1770, aged 
seventy-nine years, was the mother of five 
children; namely, Daniel, Zaccheus, Rose, 
Mary, and Abigail. Daniel Weller, who in- 
herited a portion of his father's property, and 
became a prosperous farmer, built for himself 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



263 



a house, which is still in the family's posses- 
sion, and died September 21, 1816, aged 
eighty-eight years, bequeathing to his chil- 
dren by his will, which was executed April 
13, 1 8 16, the means for each to make a good 
start in life. He married Jerusha Squires, 
and his children were: Margaret, Parnell, 
Mary, Jerusha, Experience, David, Thomas, 
Matthew, Daniel, and Bashtile. His wife, 
Jerusha, died May 18, 18 16, aged eighty-four 
years. 

Captain David Weller learned the black- 
smith's trade, and carried on that business 
successfully for many years. He succeeded to 
the possession of the homestead; and he 
erected a new house, which still stands. 
The nails, fastenings, and other iron-work 
used in its construction were made in his 
shop by hand. He was for some time a Lieu- 
tenant in the Thirteenth Regiment of the 
State militia, and was subsequently commis- 
sioned a Captain. He died April 2, 1845, 
aged seventy years. In politics he was a 
Democrat, and in his religious views an Epis- 
copalian. He married Lydia Andrews, who 
bore him two children, namely: Adeline, 
who married John Castle; and Elisha A. 
The mother died July 15, 1869, aged eighty- 
seven years. 

Elisha A. Weller was born upon the home 
farm, November 20, 1808; and his birth took 
place in a house which stands near the present 
residence of his daughter. He inherited the 
homestead, and in early manhood engaged in 
the manufacture of woollen hats. He fol- 
lowed this occupation for some years, when it 
became unprofitable; and he turned his atten- 
tion to the cultivation of his farm, and in 
1839 built the present substantial residence. 
He was a man of much public spirit, a Demo- 
crat in politics, took an active interest in 
public affairs, served with ability in all of the 



principal town offices, and was elected a mem- 
ber of the legislature. His was a busy and 
useful life until its close, which occurred 
April 13, 1884, when he was seventy-five 
years old. His wife, who was born January 
19, 18 16, became the mother of five children, 
namely: Andrew, who died July 18, i860; 
Emily; Sarah; Adelaide; and Eva. The 
mother lived to the age of seventy-eight years, 
and died August 13, 1894. 

Adelaide Weller married Andrew Northrop, 
son of Waite and Polly (Ruggles) Northrop, 
born in Brookfield, February 2, 18 17. Mr. 
Northrop' s grandfather was Andrew Northrop, 
a prosperous farmer of Brookfield; and his 
son, Waite Northrop, succeeded to the owner- 
ship of the homestead. The latter was thrifty 
and energetic, and became the owner of a 
large and productive farm. His son, Andrew 
Northrup, the late husband of Mrs. Adelaide 
Northrop, when a young man settled near the 
Iron Works in Brookfield, where he purchased 
a quarry, and engaged in burning lime. He 
carried on a large and profitable enterprise for 
many years, and finally retired from business 
in affluent circumstances, his latter days 
being passed at his comfortable home in 
Brookfield. In 1891, while on his way to 
Johnstown, N.Y., accompanied by his wife, 
he met with an accident, being struck by an 
engine and having his foot crushed, and was 
taken to the Albany hospital, where he died. 
After the death of her husband Mrs. Northrop 
returned to the Weller homestead. 



'ENRY F. REYNOLDS, who owns 
and conducts a productive farm situ- 

i9 ^^ ^ ated at Reynolds Bridge in the 

town of Thomaston, was born where he now 
resides, December 4, 1820, son of Russell 
and Mary (Castle) Reynolds. The family is 




j64 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of Scotch-Irish ancestry; and Mr. Reynolds's 
great-grandfather, Samuel Reynolds, was 
among the early settlers of Watertown, where 
he followed agriculture prosperously for a 
greater part of his life. His last years were 
spent with his son in the part of Plymouth 
now called Thomaston, where he died at the 
age of ninety years. Mr. Reynolds's grand- 
father, Samuel, Jr., was a native of Water- 
town, and was reared to farm life. He re- 
sided at home until he attained his majority, 
when he purchased a small piece of land in 
the present town of Thomaston, near the home 
of his grandson. The property contained a 
blacksmith's shop, the upper story of which 
he fitted up as a residence; and he occupied 
it as such until 1796. Then he built the 
house that still stands upon the place, in 
a good state of preservation. He followed 
agriculture as an occupation during the rest 
of his life, and died in 1813. He married 
Sarah Foote, who was born in that part of 
Litchfield which is now called Morris; and 
she was the mother of nine children. She 
died at the homestead in Thomaston in 1827. 
Russell Reynolds was born in Watertown 
in 1 78 1. He became a resident of Thomaston 
when he was fourteen years old, and during 
his father's declining years, he took charge 
of the farm. He was a thrifty and industri- 
ous farmer and a prominent and useful man in 
the community. He died in May, 1869, aged 
eighty-eight years. He was an attendant of 
the Episcopal church, and acted as a Vestry- 
man, Collector, and chorister for many years. 
His wife, Mary Castle, was a representative 
of one of the earliest families that settled in 
Plymouth ; and she became the mother of five 
children, as follows: Pamelia, who died at 
the age of ninety-five; Clarissa, who died at 
eighty-four; Emeline, who died at seventy- 
five; George, who now resides with his 



brother; and Henry F., the subject of this 
sketch. The mother died at the home of her 
son in September, 1869, aged eighty-eight 
years. 

Henry F. Reynolds was educated in the 
common schools of Thomaston, and resided at 
home, assisting his father in attending to the 
farm until he was twenty-six years old. He 
then took charge of the property, which he 
has since greatly improved. He erected his 
present substantial residence in 1857. He 
built a saw-mill near the old homestead, 
which he operates in connection with farm- 
ing, manufacturing a large quantity of lumber 
for local consumption. He owns over two 
hundred acres of land, which he keeps for 
lumber purposes. In all of his business 
operations he has been successful. He is a 
Republican in politics, and has served with 
ability as a member of the Board of Select- 
men and as Assessor for several years. He 
has long been connected with the Thomaston 
Band, of which he was the leader for over 
twenty years; and he is widely known as a 
skilful musician. 

In 1842 Mr. Reynolds was united in mar- 
riage to Lorinda Edwards, who was born in 
Hadley, Mass. She was formerly a resident 
of Ware in the same State, where her father, 
David Edwards, was employed in the fac- 
tories. Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds have one 
daughter; namely, Elizabeth C. She mar- 
ried C. F. Williams, a druggist of Thomas- 
ton, and has one son, named C. H., who mar- 
ried Martha Woodruff, and is now in business 
with his father. Mr. Reynolds was formerly 
an Episcopalian in his religious views; but 
with others he organized the Eagle Rock 
Society, and established a Congregational 
church at Reynolds Bridge, which he liber- 
ally supports, and has been active in develop- 
ing its usefulness. He has seen the locality 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



265 



in which he lives expand from a thinly settled 
district into a thriving village, named in honor 
of his ancestors, who were the first settlers 
there; and the new bridge and railway station 
also bear his name. He occupies a promi- 
nent position in the community, and is re- 
garded with the highest respect by all. 



LPrEDERICK W. KNOWLES, a pro- 
P J, gressive farmer and an enterprising 
insurance agent of New Milford, was 
born in that town, October 26, 1859, son of 
Charles W. and Harriet L. (Bard) Knowles. 
Mr. Knowles's grandparents were Nelson and 
Eunice (Warren) Knowles. Nelson Knowles 
resided in Lanesville, where he owned and 
operated a grist-mill. 

Charles W. Knowles, who was born in New 
Milford in February, 1836, purchased a small 
farm in Lanesville, where he engaged in 
farming and milling until he moved to Nor- 
walk. Here he remained until his death, 
which occurred in 1880, at the age of forty- 
four years. He was a member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church, and was prominent in 
church work. His wife was a daughter of 
Charles M. and Sarah (Judson) Bard, the 
former of whom was a son of Isaac and Abiah 
(Miner) Bard, of Derby, Conn. Isaac Bard 
settled in New Milford, where he purchased 
of his brother Daniel the farm now owned 
and occupied by Frederick W. Knowles, the 
subject of this sketch. He erected the pres- 
ent house, made other improvements upon the 
place, and resided there for the rest of his 
life. He died in 1844, aged sixty-one years. 
His first wife was Martha (Odell) Bard, who 
died young, leaving one daughter, named 
Athilia. He married for his second wife 
Abiah Miner, who became the mother of two 
children; namely, Charles M. and George. 



Charles M. Bard was born in New Milford, 
and succeeded to the ownership of his father's 
farm. He remodelled the house, set out fruit 
trees, and cultivated the farm successfully 
during his active period. He continues to re- 
side there; and, although he has now reached 
the age of eighty-eight years, he is still bright 
and active. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Sarah A. Judson, daughter of Morris 
Judson, and whom he married February 4, 
1836, had one child, Harriet L., who married 
Charles W. Knowles. Mrs. Charles W. 
Knowles reared two children; namely, Fred- 
erick W. and Edwin M, The mother was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and lived to the age of twenty-eight years. 

Frederick W. Knowles received his educa- 
tion in the schools of Lanesville and South 
Norwalk. In this town at the age of twenty- 
one he commenced work in a paper-box fac- 
tory, where he remained for five years. After 
running a tea wagon for a time, he took the 
agency of the Hartford Life Insurance Com- 
pany, a business which he still follows with 
considerable energy and success. In 1886 he 
returned to New Milford, and once more en- 
tered the paper-box business. This time he 
served as foreman of the Ives factory, and 
continued so employed until 1890. Then he 
moved to his present residence at the old Bard 
homestead, whichhad become his by inheri- 
tance. Since taking charge of the property, 
he has enlarged it to seventy acres by the pur- 
chase of adjoining land; and he has re- 
modelled the building, besides otherwise im- 
proving the estate. In addition to general 
farming he conducts a well-equipped dairy, 
and raises some fine horses. These various 
occupations bring him a satisfactory income 
at the same time that they are congenial to his 
tastes. 

On December 4, 1881, Mr. Knowles was 



266 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



united in marriage to Gertrude E. Martin, 
who died at the age of thirty-four years. On 
May 20, 1889, he wedded for his second wife 
Elizabeth Graft, daughter of Joseph and 
Christine Graft. By this union he has three 
children, namely: Charles Miner, who was 
born June 5, 1890; Christine Gladys, who 
was born June 14, 1893; and Gertrude Eliza- 
beth, who was born November 7, 1895. Mr. 
Knowles is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows of New Milford, and 
both he and his wife attend the Episcopal 
church. He is an active, energetic farmer, a 
reliable insurance agent, and a worthy citi- 
zen. In politics he supports the Republican 
party. 



"jTJDWARD J. TRESCOTT, whose por- 
JPtrait is here given, is a well-known 
business man of Norfolk, Conn. 
He was born in the adjoining town of North 
Canaan, June 25, 1848, son of Wesley and 
Elizabeth (Kellogg) Trescott. Mr. Trescott's 
paternal grandfather, Jonathan Trescott, was 
a native and a lifelong resident of Massachu- 
setts. He was a citizen of influence, and 
represented his district in the legislature in 
Boston. 

Wesley Trescott, son of Jonathan, was born 
in Massachusetts, and was brought up to work 
at farming. He remained at home with his 
parents until attaining his majority, when he 
came to North Canaan, Conn., where he pur- 
chased a farm, and successfully engaged in 
agricultural labors. He was active in politi- 
cal affairs, serving in many of the important 
town offices, and was a Trial Justice for 
thirty consecutive years, during which time 
not one of his decisions were ever reversed by 
a higher court. He served as a representa- 
tive in the Connecticut legislature, once at 
New Haven and once in Hartford, before 



that city became the sole capital of the State. 
Wesley Trescott died at the age of seventy 
years. His wife, Elizabeth Kellogg, a daugh- 
ter of Albert Kellogg, became the mother of 
five children, who were named as follows: 
Jane, Martin, Edward J., Elizabeth, and 
Henry. Mrs. Wesley Trescott, like her hus- 
band, passed away at seventy years of age. 

Edward J. Trescott resided with his par- 
ents until reaching the age of twenty-seven. 
He was engaged in the meat trade in Great 
Barrington, Mass., for four years, and also- 
had business interests in Norfolk and Canaan, 
Conn. In 1891 he established his residence 
permanently in Norfolk, and has since con- 
ducted business with marked ability and with 
prosperous results. In 1889 Mr. Trescott 
was united in marriage with Genevieve Clark, 
daughter of Nelson Clark, of Canaan. Mr. 
and Mrs. Trescott have one son, named 
Wesley E. 

Mr. Trescott is a Democrat in politics, and 
in 1884 represented the town of North Canaan 
in the legislature. He is a member of the 
Board of School Visitors, and is at present 
Justice of Peace, an office to which he was 
elected in 1894. In Masonry Mr. Trescott 
has advanced to the thirty-second degree. 
He is a member of Housatonic Lodge, No. 
61, of Meridian Chapter, Royal Arch, Tyrian 
Council, Washington Commandery, Knights 
Templars, and of the Bridgeport Consistory 
and Mystic Shrine. 



TgTENRY N. CAMP, a leading farmer 
r=H and extensive cattle dealer of 
-'- V^ Bridgewater, was born in New Mil- 
ford, October 4, 1826, son of Elijah J. and 
Adeline (Northrop) Camp. Mr. Camp's 
great-grandfather was Jonah Camp, a resident 
of Milford, Conn.; and his grandfather, John 




EDWARD J. TRESCOTT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



269 



Camp, was likewise a native of the town. 
John Camp settled upon Second Hill in the 
town of New Milford, where he~purchased a 
large tract of land, and became a prosperous 
farmer. He served as a musician in the Rev- 
olutionary War, and died at an advanced age. 
He married Annis Clark, daughter of Thomas 
Clark, and reared three sons; namely, Elijah 
J., Nathan H., and Gerardus W. The grand- 
mother lived to a ripe old age. 

Elijah J. Camp, Mr. Camp's father, was 
bprn in New Milford in 1792. He conducted 
a wagon manufactory, and also became quite 
an extensive maker of drums, the heads for 
which he tanned and prepared himself. In 
the Second Hill district he owned a good 
farm, which he cultivated successfully until 
his death, which occurred when he was 
seventy-five years old. His wife, whom he 
married October ig, 1820, was born October 
19, 1804, daughter of Solomon Northrop. 
She bore him seven children, as follows: 
George, who was born September 21, 1824; 
Henry N., the subject of this sketch; Mairy, . 
born August 17, 1830; John, born January 
21, 1833; Frederick, born February 28, 
1836; Edwin, born January 29, 1841; and 
Martha, born August 3, 1843. 

Henry N. Camp attended the district 
schools of his native town until he reached 
the age of twelve years, when he commenced 
work as a farm laborer at four dollars per 
month. He continued in this occupation for 
ten years. After his marriage he purchased a 
farm of forty acres, located near his father's 
property, built on it a new barn, and there re- 
sided for twelve years. At the expiration 
of that space of time he sold it, and bought a 
larger farm of one hundred acres, knowra as 
the Babbitt estate, where he now resides. 
Since then he has increased his land by the 
purchase of sixty valuable acres in the town 



of Brookfield, has remodelled his buildings, 
and otherwise improved the property. In ad- 
dition to the customary products of general 
farming he raises from one to two tons of 
tobacco per year. For a number of years he 
dealt extensively in cattle, buying principally 
in Canada, and driving his herds to Eastern 
markets, where he sold at prices which 
brought him handsome returns for his labor 
and investment. He is a Democrat in poli- 
tics; and, though not anxious for political 
notoriety, he served the town with ability as 
a member of the Board of Selectmen for two 
terms. 

On December 25, 1848, Mr. Camp was 
united in marriage to Julia E. Frost, daugh- 
ter of Curtis and Sally (Briscoe) Frost. 
They have one daughter, Mary F., who was 
born October 5, 1849. She wedded Gideon 
W. Northrop, a prosperous farmer and real 
estate owner of Bridgewater, son of Grant and 
Rebecca (Camp) Northrop, and has two chil- 
dren: Henry C, born May 8, 1873; and 
Emma R., born October 15, 1876. Mrs. 
Camp died in 1892, aged sixty-two years. 
She attended the Episcopal church. Mr. 
Camp has attained success through careful 
management and close application to busi- 
ness. 



Yp)TENRY H. BART LETT, general 
r^ manufacturing agent and general 

Ji® V, J superintendent of the Heminway & 

Bartlett Silk Company of Watertown, was 
born in Williamsburg, Hampshire County, 
Mass., February 11, 1849, son of Thaddeus 
and Evelyn (Bannister) Bartlett. His grand- 
father, who was a farmer, resided for many 
years in Williamsburg, and died there at an 
advanced age; and his grandmother, whose 
maiden name was White, lived to be ninety- 
two years of age, rearing eight children. 



I'JO 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Thaddeus Bartlett, father of Henry H. 
Bartlett, was born in Willliamsburg, and 
reared on his father's farm in that town. On 
reaching man's estate, he entered the world of 
trade, and became well known as a trades- 
man. He was for many years a dealer in 
meat and fish in -'Hampshire County, Massa- 
chusetts, and died in Goshen, that State, at 
the age of seventy-six. His wife, who was a 
daughter of Jonathan Bannister, of New York 
State, is now living in Bridgeport, Conn., 
and is a member of the Methodist church, 
which her husband also attended. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bartlett were the parents of eleven chil- 
dren, six of whom are living; namely, 
Martha, Harriet, Frank, Henry H., Mary, 
and Edward. The latter is in the silk manu- 
factory under the charge of his brother. 

Henry H. Bartlett went to work in the silk 
factory when a boy of^ight 'years, in the 
mean time also attendingfchool. He finished 
his schooling at the age of seventeen years, 
and when but eighteen was given charge of 
a room in the silk works. When he was 
twenty-two years of age, he was made superin- 
tendent of the William Skinner factory, in 
which he had worked as a boy, and acceptably 
filled the position till 1874, the year of the 
destructive flood. At that time he went to 
Holyoke, and took charge of a factory which 
he assisted in organizing; and two years later 
he removed to Watertown, and was made 
superintendent of the old factory of Hemin- 
way & Sons. After holding this position for 
twelve years, he was taken into partnership by 
Buell Herainway, the son of General Hemin- 
way, proprietor of the old factory, and assisted 
in organizing the present establishment, 
which has been in successful operation since 
1888. Mr. Bartlett acts as general manager, 
manufacturer's agent, and executive officer of 
the company. As the establishment is one 



of the most extensive silk factories in the 
United States, his position is one of great 
responsibility. Starting as a boy, obliged to 
earn his own living at an age when most boys 
are perfectly free from care, Mr. Bartlett 
steadily won his way to a foothold on the 
heights of prosperity. His sterling char- 
acter, clear understanding, and ripe judgment 
win for him respect from all with whom he 
comes in contact. 

In 1874 Mr. Bartlett was united in marriage 
with Lucretia E., daughter of Joseph Reece, 
a skilled mechanic of Florence, Mass. Their 
union has been blessed by the birth of one 
daughter, Florence M. Politically, Mr. Bart- 
lett is independent, but inclined to favor the 
Republican party. A member of the Masonic 
fraternity, he is Senior Warden of Federal 
Lodge, No. 17, and belongs to Granite Chap- 
ter, No. 96. He is also a member of the 
Knights of Pythias and of the American Me- 
chanics' Association, belonging to Terry 
Council of Watertown. In religious belief he 
is an Episcopalian, and his wife and daughter 
are members of the church of that denomina- 
tion in Watertown. 




|RS. SARAH A. SABIN, widow ' 
of the late Charles C. Sabin^ of 
New Milford, was born in that 
town, March 12, 181 3, daughter of Ebenezer 
and Philotheta (Lessey) Hill. She is a rep- 
resentative of one of the most prominent fam- 
ilies of New Milford. Her grandparents were 
Silas and Sarah (Leach) Hill, the former of 
whom was born in 1733, and first settled in 
Fairfield, Conn. He later moved to New 
Milford, where he purchased land and devel- 
oped the property which is now owned by 
Charles Hatch. In 1758 he enlisted as a 
private for service in the French War; and, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



271 



after serving one year, he returned to his 
home, and passed the remainder of his life in 
attending to his farm. He died in 1798, 
aged sixty-five years. His wife, who died in 
1792, aged fifty-six, was the mother of ten 
children, of whom Ebenezer, Mrs. Sabin's 
father, was the eighth born and the, youngest 
son. Ebenezer Hill, who was born December 
15, 1778, succeeded to the possession of the 
homestead. He became a prosperous farmer, 
and was prominent among the leading people 
of the district. He died in 1856, aged 
seventy-eight years. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Philotheta Lessey, daughter of John 
F. and Ann Lessey, became the mother of 
four children, as follows: Amy, Maria, Eliza 
A., and Sarah A. She died in 1862, aged 
eighty-two years. - 

Charles C. Sabin was born in Naples, On- 
tario County, N.Y., January 12, 181 1, son of 
Huram and Olive Sabin. His father was an 
early settler in Ontario County, where he be- 
came a farmer; and both he and his wife lived 
to an advanced age. Charles C. Sabin 
learned the millwright's trade, which he fol- 
lowed as an occupation for the greater portion 
of his life. In early manhood he settled 
upon a farm in Lanesville, town of New Mil- 
ford, and improved the property by erecting 
new buildings, among them being the house 
in which his widow now resides. He was a 
Republican in politics. He is well remem- 
bered for his upright and conscientious prin- 
ciples. He died December 21, 1884. On 
December 15, 1835, he was united in mar- 
riage to Sarah A. Hill, the subject of this 
sketch. Mrs. Sabin has had four children, 
namely: Charles H., born March 20, 1837, 
who married Laura Throp, and died May 5, 
1875, leaving a widow and one daughter, 
named Harriet, the latter now the wife of 
H. D. Warner; Philotheta L., born April 



II, 1842, who died July i, 1861; Cornelia 
R. M. B., born December 15, 1847, who 
married Albert T. Smith, and has one daugh- 
ter, named Sarah A. S. ; and William F., 
born March 2, 1850, who died April 24, 
1871. 

Early in life Mrs. Sabin united with the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which she 
was a member for twenty years. Influenced 
by a change in her religious opinions, she 
then left the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
now attends the Friends' Society, of which 
she has since been a devout member. Al- 
though she has reached an advanced age, she 
is enjoying good health, while her mental 
faculties are vigorous. She is an extensive 
reader, is well informed upon current relig- 
ious and political questions; and her opin- 
ions, which she freely expresses, are sound 
and well founded. . . 



(sTtNDREW G. BARNES, one of New 
^L Milford's most" prominent farmers 
/aJls^_^_ and a member, of the Connecticut 
legislature, was born in Sherman, Conn., 
November 15, 1838, son of Albert and Cath- 
erine (Gaylord) Barnes. Mr. Barnes's great- 
grandparents were Stephen and Ann Barnes, 
residents of Lyme, Conn. His grandfather, 
Andrew Barnes, who was born in Lyme in 
1773, resided for some time in the town of 
Sherman, and later bought a farm situated 
upon Stilson's Hill, in the town of New Mil- 
ford, where he lived for the remainder of his 
life. He became a very prosperous farmer 
and a prominent man in the community, and 
died in 1858. He married Polly Giddings, 
daughter of Jonathan Giddings, of Sherman, 
and she reared six children; namely, Albert, 
Loretta, Samuel H., Sarah, Mary, and Laura. 
Albert Barnes, father of Mr. Barnes, was 



272 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



born in Sherman, August 6, 1805. He was 
reared to agricultural life; and, when a young 
man, he purchased and subsequently cultivated 
a good farm in Sherman. He subsequently 
became an extensive land-owner, was a promi- 
nent figure in public affairs, and filled various 
town offices, which he administered with abil- 
ity and good judgment. He was widely 
known and highly respected for his many 
commendable traits of character. Both his 
public and private career was marked by a 
sturdy adherence to right principles. He 
died at the age of seventy-four years. His 
wife became the mother of three children; 
namely, Andrew G., George A., and 
Hiram S. 

Andrew G. Barnes received his education 
in the schools of Sherman and Danbury. 
When but thirteen years old, he commenced to 
develop the spirit of industry which has since 
been a prominent trait in his character by 
planting and successfully raising the first crop 
of tobacco ever attempted in the neighbor- 
hood, upon the land which his father had given 
him for the purpose. At the age of nineteen 
years he engaged in burning brick upon his 
father's farm, in addition to his cultivation of 
tobacco. In due time he realized enough 
money to purchase his grandfather's farm in 
New Milford, upon which he commenced gen- 
eral farming and tobacco raising. Later he 
engaged in the cattle business, buying for the 
market, eventually becoming an extensive 
dealer in Western cattle, which he first 
brought East in droves, but later shipped 
them by rail. After making various improve- 
ments in his farm on Stilson's Hill, he sold 
that property, and bought his present estate, 
which was known as David Noble's farm. In 
1891, his barns having been destroyed by fire, 
he built upon their sites much more spacious 
and convenient structures. He has also re- 



modelled and enlarged his residence, and 
built a large tobacco warehouse. He raises 
about twelve acres of the weed annually, which 
amounts, when packed, to seventy-five cases. 
He owns a finely located farm upon the op- 
posite side of the river, which, like other 
land in the Housatonic valley, is of much 
fertility. Here he keeps from sixty to one 
hundred full-blooded Holstein cows, whose 
milk he ships direct to New York City. He 
is President of the New Milford Hat Com- 
pany, in which he is a heavy stockholder; 
and the success of that enterprise is in a 
measure due to his energy and business abil- 
ity. 

Mr. Barnes married for his first wife Hattie 
Seeley, daughter of Gregory Seeley. She 
died, leaving one son, named Albert Sher- 
wood, who also died in 1893, aged twenty- 
three. He married for his second wife Mrs. 
Jennie Weaver, daughter of Sheldon Baker. 
In politics Mr. Barnes has always supported 
the Republican party. In 1894 he was 
elected a representative to the legislature by 
a large majority, being the first Republican 
to represent New Milford in that body. As a 
legislator, he is. alive to the best interests of 
his town and State. 




ENRY WELCOME WOODRUFF, 
an enterprising business man and a 
-^ V well-known philanthropist of Wash- 
ington, was born in that town, November 13, 
1837, son of Luman and Eunice (Bills) Wood- 
ruff. Luman Woodruff was born in Washing- 
ton in 1803. When quite young, he received 
an accidental injury which caused the paralysis 
of his left arm. This incapacitated him for 
manual labor ; but he was very successful as a 
business man, and for many years was engaged 
as a drover. He died February 6, 1888. His 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



273 



wife, Eunice, who was born in 181 1 in Tol- 
land County, Connecticut, died March 17, 
1 891. Seven children blessed their union, 
namely: Jane, born in 1835, who married Dan- 
iel Taylor, and has had six children — Frank, 
Sidney, Daniel, Lizzie (Mrs. Douglas), Fred, 
and Grace (Mrs. Sanford), all but Sidney and 
Fred being married; Henry W., the subject 
of this article; Isaac, born in 1839, who died 
in 1884; Caroline, who married a Mr. Taylor 
for her first husband, George Schenck for her 
second, and William Bailey for her third, and 
has one son, Frank Taylor; Sarah, born in 
1844, now Mrs. Churchill, and mother of one 
child. Bertha; David C, born in 1849; Abner, 
born in 1852, who married Ida Durgey, and 
has one child, Lena M. 

Henry W. Woodruff, after acquiring the 
rudiments of his education in the district 
schools of his native town, studied for some 
time at the Gunnery, the noted finishing 
school in Washington village. At the age of 
sixteen he began to learn the carpenter's trade, 
and in 1859 took up the manufacture of turned 
handles for axes and other tools, a calling in 
which he was successfully engaged for ten 
years. He then disposed of his busines.s, and 
engaged in a mercantile enterprise in Wash- 
ington Green for five years. By that time he 
was convinced that he could do better at his 
original calling, and he repurchased his old 
shop and resumed the manufacture of turned 
handles, etc. He was burned out three years 
afterward, and he was obliged to rebuild. 
About this time a company, organized for 
the purpose of manufacturing matches in 
the town, engaged Mr. Woodruff to do the 
work for them. This he did for three years, 
managing simultaneously the handle shop, the 
match factory, and a saw-mill. He retained 
the handle business for five years after 
rebuilding the shop, and then took up the 



manufacture of wagons and carriages, to- 
gether with the repairing of old vehicles. 
His carriage business likewise proved a suc- 
cess, and is now in a flourishing condition ; 
while his saw-mill has an annual output of 
three hundred thousand feet of lumber. He 
gives constant employment to a number of 
men, and is an important factor in the business 
life of the locality. Some time ago, at New 
Preston Depot, he purchased a tract of wild 
brush land, which is now the site of five cosey 
homes. He has materially aicted in the up- 
building of Washington, and is generally 
recognized as a public benefactor. 

In i860 Mr. Woodruff was married to 
Martha M. Warner, daughter of Charles J. 
Warner, of Washington village. She died 
March i, 1879, at the age of thirty-eight 
years. She had but one child, Helen, born 
May 7, 1873, who died November 8- of the 
same year. In 1880 Mr. Woodruff contracted 
a second marriage, his bride being Amelia 
Lyons, daughter of David and Charlotte (Dart) 
Lyons, of Sheffield, Mass. David Lyons was 
a rope-maker, and worked at his trade for many 
years. His last years were spent at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Woodruff, where he died at 
the age of seventy-one. His wife is yet liv- 
ing, and is now in her seventy-third year. 
She also makes her home with the Wood- 
ruffs. They reared six children, namely: 
Hannah, wife of Truman Shores, who has two 
children — Merritt .C. and Fred S. ; George; 
Frank, who married Emma Grant, and has six 
children — Mary, Charles H., Elsie, Lottie, 
Frankie, and Lester; Addie, wife of George 
Decker, who has eight children — Ida, Archie, 
John, Cora, Louis, Nellie, Maud, and Min- 
nie; Amelia; and Lorinda, wife of Charles 
Northrop. 

In politics Mr. Woodruff favors the Repub- 
lican party. In his religious belief he is a 



274 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Congregational. He is a public-spirited and 
large-hearted man. His open-handed generos- 
ity has earned for his residence the name of the 
"Transient's Home." 



"Tt^^OBERT LITTLE, a prosperous farmer 
I I^V^ and extensive land-owner of Salis- 
■l-^ V ^ bury, in the north-west part of 
Litchfield County, Connecticut, was born in 
Sheffield, Mass., October 4, 1822. His par- 
ents, Ralph and Maria (Fox) Little, were 
both natives of East Haddara, Conn. Ralph 
Little was a merchant in the early part of his 
life, and later devoted his time and strength 
to agriculture. He lived for many years in 
Sheffield, dying at the age of seventy-two. 
He was twice married. His first wife, Maria 
Fox, the daughter of Robert Fox, of East 
Haddam, died at the age of thirty-six, leaving 
six children: Lucius, Ralph, Robert, Annie, 
Frank, and Augusta. Mr. Little's second 
wife, Louisa, daughter of E. Royce, of Shef- 
field, died at the age of fifty-six. 

Robert Little worked for some time when 
a young man as clerk in a store. In 1842 he 
settled on the farm that he now owns, which 
is located in the eastern part of Salisbury, on 
the Housatonic River. This part of Salis- 
bury is rich in history, the first white child 
born in the town having opened its eyes to 
the light on this farm, and a lot near the 
river, called "the Fort lot," being the site of 
the block-house to which the whites retreated 
in time of danger from the Indians. This 
farm, when Mr. Little purchased it, contained 
one hundred and forty acres; and he has 
added to it till now it covers three hundred 
and forty acres. He also owns two other 
farms, one of one hundred and fifty-two acres 
and one of one hundred and ten acres, all 
finely improved. Mr. Little is extensively 



engaged in general farming, in which he has 
been very successful. 

In 1844 he was united in marriage with 
Cornelia M. Eldred, daughter of Erastus and 
Maria (Ball) Eldred, of Salisbury. After 
full fifty years of wedlock Mrs. Little passed 
from earth on March 7, 1895, at the age of 
seventy-three. She was the mother of one 
daughter, Minnie Little, who married Elson 
Hornbeck, and died at the age of twenty- 
two. 

Mr. Little has a beautiful home. The 
estate is very appropriately called Elm Farm, 
being adorned with some of the finest elms 
in the vicinity. One handsome tree, just op- 
posite the house, is said to be the largest 
spreading elm for the size of the trunk ever 
known. 

The accompanying portrait of Mr. Robert 
Little will be recognized and appreciated by 
the friends and acquaintances of this esti- 
mable gentleman. 



TTAHARLES POMEROY, of Gaylords- 
( jp ville, in the town of New Milford, 

^«^ a dealer in lumber and builder's 

hardware, lime, cement, and phosphate, was 
born in Franklin, Delaware County, N.Y., 
October 12, 1834, son of Wesley and Sophro- 
nia (Hendrix) Pomeroy. Mr. Pomeroy's grand- 
parents were Seymour and Clarissa (Gibbons) 
Pomeroy, the former of whom was a native 
of Massachusetts. In early manhood he went 
to Delaware County, New York, where he 
purchased a large tract of wild land, which 
was covered with heavy timber; and he be- 
came one of the first settlers in that region. 
He began the task of establishing a home by 
building a rude cabin to shelter his family 
from the storms and wild animals which 
abounded in the forest ; and by patient indus- 




ROBERT LITTLE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



277 



try and perseverance he at length succeeded in 
clearing and cultivating a farm. He cut his 
timber, and rafted it down the river to 
market, continued to clear and improve more 
land until he possesse'd a valuable farm of 
three hundred and fifty acres, most of which 
was eligible to cultivation. He became a 
very prominent citizen in the town of Frank- 
lin. Seymour and Clarissa Pomeroy both 
lived to reach the advanced age of eighty 
years; and their children who lived to ma- 
turity were as follows: Wesley, William, 
Orle, Mark, Harvey, Hannah, Sally, Jane, 
and Martha. 

Wesley Pomeroy, Mr. Pomeroy' s father, 
was born in Franklin, Delaware County, 
N.Y., and was reared to farm life. When a 
young man, he bought sixty acres of his 
father's farm, upon which he commenced 
farming on his own account; and, realizing a 
profitable return for his, labor, he added more 
land at intervals, until fie possessed three 
hundred and twenty acres in all. He con- 
ducted general farming and stock-raising suc- 
cessfully until his death, which occurred at 
the age of eighty-four. His wife, Sophronia 
Hendrix, became the mother of ten children, 
namely: Seymour; Charles, the subject of 
this sketch; Murray; Ariel; Orle; Clinton; 
Jane; Martha; Emma; and Julia. The 
mother died at the age of sixty years. 

Charles Pomeroy received his education in 
the district schools of his native town and at 
the Franklin Institute. He followed agricult- 
ure until 1883, when he bought the Graves 
farm of forty-eight acres in Gaylordsville, 
Conn., together with a tract of sixty acres, 
situated upon Long Mountain. He then 
established himself in the lumber business. 
He enlarged and remodelled the residence and 
out-buildings, erected a storehouse for lumber 
and another for his lime, cement, hardware. 



etc., which contains his business office; and 
his equipment for the special line of trade in 
which he is engaged is suitable and conven- 
ient. Since opening his business, he has se- 
cured a large and profitable trade; and, con- 
sidering the industrious character of the 
proprietor, it may be safely inferred that his 
future business prosperity is assured. 

In 1 86 1 Mr. Pomeroy was united in mar- 
riage to Josephine Hallock, his first wife, 
who was a daughter of Homer Hallock. She 
died in 1875, leaving one son, named Henry 
H., who was born September 17, 1862. In 
1878 Mr. Pomeroy married for his second 
wife Mary E. Helsten, daughter of Eric and 
Mary (Harty) Helsten. He is a Republican 
in politics, and a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Henry H. Pomeroy, Mr. 
Pomeroy's only son, is extensively engaged 
in farming and cattle, raising. He owns two 
valuable farms, situated upon Long Mountain, 
and is one of the leading business men in his 
locality. On December 5, 1885, he wedded 
Edna Chase, daughter of John Chase, and has 
one son, named Charles C, who was born 
October 28, if 



T^ATHANIEL M. STRONG, an enter- 
I =M prising druggist and general merchant 
J}p V ^ of North Woodbury and an ex- 
member of the legislature, was born in 
Woodbury, April 6, 1849, son of Nathaniel- 
L. and Mary R. (Miner) Strong. The first 
ancestor of the family in America was John 
Strong, a native of Taunton, England, who 
emigrated to New England about the year 
1638. He settled in Woodbury in the year 
1700, was engaged in farming, and raised a 
family of eight children. His third son. 
Preserved Strong, married Esther Stoddard, 
by whom he became the father of five chil- 



278 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



dren. Anthony, his fourth child, was Mr. 
Strong's great-grandfather. 

Anthony Strong was born in Woodbury, 
December 9, 1759. When a young man, he 
went to the town of Washington, where he 
engaged in operating mills for a number of 
years. In 18 17 he returned to Woodbury, 
and settled at the old family homestead, now 
owned by F. T. Strong; and he resided there 
until his death, which took place in 1829. 
He served as a private in the Revolutionary 
War, but subsequently was a Captain in the 
State militia. He married Phebe Curtis, and 
had three children; namely, Phebe, Anthony 
C, and Nathaniel. Anthony C. Strong, Mr. 
Strong's grandfather, was born September 7, 
1792. He assisted his father in running the 
mills in Worthington, and later became a 
successful farmer in Woodbury, where he 
passed the rest of his life. He married Julia 
Lambert, and raised a family of four children, 
namely: Nathaniel L., Mr. Strong's father; 
Henry P.; Willis A.; and Frederick T. 
The grandparents each lived to an advanced 
age. 

Nathaniel L. Strong was born in Woodbury 
in March, 1821. When a young man, he en- 
gaged in farming upon his own account, pur- 
chasing and settling upon the property now 
owned by Julius Galpin. He was indus- 
trious in his calling and an exemplary citi- 
zen. He was engaged in agriculture until his 
death, which took place when he was fifty- 
nine years old. In politics he was a Repub- 
lican. He served with ability in several of 
the important town offices, and he was a mem- 
ber of the Congregational church. His first 
wife, in maidenhood Mary R. Miner, to 
whom he was married in 1846, was a daughter 
of Nathaniel Miner. She died at the age of 
thirty-five, leaving one son, Nathaniel M., 
the subject of this sketch. His second wife 



was Mary (Bryan) Strong, who had no chil- 
dren. 

Nathaniel M. Strong, after receiving a good 
education in the schools of his native town, 
taught school for six years. He then engaged 
as a clerk in the store kept by W. A. Strong. 
After spending one year in this employment, 
he joined his employer in erecting the build- 
ing known as Strong's Block and in fitting up 
and starting a large store for the drug and 
hardware business. The two had conducted 
the store unitedly for about eight years, when 
in 1885 Nathaniel purchased his partner's in- 
terest, added a full line of groceries, paints, 
and oils, etc., and since has successfully con- 
tinued the business alone. He is a member 
of the First Congregational Church, and in 
politics he supports the Republican party. 
He has served as School Visitor, was for three 
years a member of the Board of Education, 
and represented his town in the legislature in 
1889. He is a member of the Order of 
American Mechanics and of the Foresters. 
He is highly esteemed in both business and 
social circles as a progressive and enterprising 
merchant and citizen. 

Mr. Strong married for his first wife Mar- 
garet Lambert, daughter of Henry Lambert, 
who died, leaving no children. He married 
for his second wife Julia Miner, daughter of 
Solomon B. Miner, of Waterbury. Mr. and 
Mrs. Strong have had two children; namely, 
Frank and a daughter. The daughter is now 
deceased. The family occupy a very pleasant 
residence on Main Street. 



•AMES HINE, M.D., one of the oldest 
and most skilful physicians of New 
Milford, was born there on July 31, 
182 2, son of Lyman and Hannah (Roberts) 
Hine. The Hine family rs traced to Thomas 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



279 



Hine, the first representative in America, 
who owned land in Milford as early as 1646. 
His son Stephen, the next in line, was fol- 
lowed by Ambrose. Stephen Hine, second, 
son of Ambrose, spent his life in Wood- 
bridge, Conn., where he was a prosperous car- 
penter. According to tradition, he erected 
the first frame house built in Bridgewater, 
which was then a part of the town of New 
Milford. He performed the work for John 
Treat; and he received for his pay two hun- 
dred and fifteen acres of common land, that 
he afterward gave to his son, Stephen, third. 
He was also at one time interested in the 
Litchfield Review. His wife before marriage 
was Miss Elizabeth Carrington. After 
Stephen Hine, third, was married to Miss 
Naomi Peck he came to New Milford, and 
purchased of John Treat one hundred and 
thirty-eight acres, making the total amount of 
land owned by him about three hundred and 
fifty acres. On getting possession of his 
purchase he erected a log house, and pro- 
ceeded to the work of clearing the land. In 
1798 he purchased the farm of N. Taylor, Jr., 
at the mouth of Rocky River, together with 
a saw-mill, grist-mill, fulling-mill, and dye 
shop. For a number of years he carried on 
quite an extensive business in the various in- 
dustries these buildings were designed for. 
He purchased and brought to New Milford 
the first two-horse wagon owned in that town, 
using it to deliver flour from his mill. 
Toward the close of his life he retired from 
active business, making over to his sons all 
his property except what he deemed sufficient 
to supply his needs. He was drafted for ser- 
vice in the Revolutionary War, and was pres- 
ent at both the evacuation of New York and 
the surrender of General Burgoyne. His 
powder-horn, which he brought home from 
the war, is in the possession of his grandson, 



Dr. James Hine, He died in 1833, seventy- 
nine years of age; and his wife died in 1818, 
at the age of sixty years. They had five sons ; 
namely, Clark, William, Anan, Isaac, and 
Lyman. 

Lyman Hine, who was born January 28, 
1793, remained with his parents during his 
boyhood. When he started for himself, he 
engaged in the manufacture of fire brick for 
stove lining, the first time that work was 
undertaken in this country. He carried on 
this industry for many years, doing an exten- 
sive business. He finally relinquished it in 
favor of his sons, William H. and George, 
and retired from active labor. Up to 1850 he 
held Democratic principles, after which he 
became an adherent of the Republican party. 
He served acceptably as Selectman of his 
town, and lived to the age of eighty -nine 
years. His wife, Hannah (Roberts) Hine, to 
whom he was united in September, 1837, died 
when she was sixty-nine years old. Both 
were faithful members of the Congregational 
church. Their four children are : William 
H., Louisa, James, and George. 

James Hine, M.D., acquired his early edu- 
cation in the common schools. He subse- 
quently studied at the Vermont University, 
from which he graduated in the class of 1844, 
and then entered the medical department of 
the University of the City of New York, com- 
pleting the .course there in 1847. Soon after 
he came to New Milford, his native town, and 
engaged in the practice of his profession. 
For many years he has been the leading phy- 
sician and surgeon of that vicinity. After 
his marriage he purchased the Northrop home- 
stead on Bridge Street, the early home of the 
Mygatts, moved it to a vacant lot, and 
changed it into a double tenement - house, 
which still stands. On the old site he erected 
his fine large house and barn, and laid out a 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



beautiful lawn. He has also been engaged 
in building or remodelling other houses; and 
he has had West Street extended, and laid out 
a number of building lots. 

On October 9, 1849, Dr. Hine was united 
in marriage with Miss Catherine Northrop, a 
daughter of Cyrus and Betsey (Wells) North- 
rop. Her father was a successful farmer and 
highly esteemed citizen of New Milford. She 
died in 1883, sixty-four years of age, leaving 
three children, as follows: Francis L., born 
December 6, 1850, who is married to Mary I. 
Low, and has two children; Sophia M., born 
April 15, 1855, wife of Professor J. T. Shaw, 
of Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, and has 
two children; and Caroline L., born Decem- 
ber I, 1857, who married George B. Noble, 
of East Hampton, and has two children. 
Francis L. Hine, who lives in Brooklyn, 
N.Y., and is Vice-President of the Astor 
Place Bank, in the organization and develop- 
ment of which he was one of the leaders and 
is now its principal manager, was one of the 
original incorporators of the New Milford 
Savings Bank, has been a director of it, Vice- 
President, and President, having held the 
last-named office for many years before illness 
compelled his resignation, and was instru- 
mental in securing the site of the bank build- 
ing, obtained its design, and largely superin- 
tended its erection. 

Dr. Hine is a faithful supporter of Repub- 
lican principles. In 1853 he served as Judge 
of Probate. On one occasion he was nomi- 
nated for representative of his district, and 
came within one vote of being elected. 



BALDWIN, a prominent 
residing upon Long Moun- 
the town of New Milford, 
was born on the farm he now owns and occu- 




pies, August I, 1831, son of David M. and 
Laura M. (Fairchild) Baldwin. The family 
is of English ancestry, and descends from 
Nathaniel, son of Richard Baldwin, who emi- 
grated to America in the early days of the 
New England colony," and was one of the 
early settlers of Milford, Conn. The descent 
continued through Daniel, first, Daniel, 
second, and Jeremiah, first, to Jeremiah, 
second, and Eunice Baldwin, who were 
Andrew J. Baldwin's great-grandparents. 
Jeremiah and Eunice Baldwin settled in New 
Milford, where they passed the remainder 
of their lives. Their children were David, 
John, Jeremiah, Eunice, Polly, and Hannah, 
Jeremiah, third, Mr. Baldwin's grandfather, 
in company with his two brothers, bought a 
tract of three hundred and fifty acres of land, 
situated upon Long Mountain, which they di- 
vided equally between them. Jeremiah's por- 
tion, including a later purchase made by him 
and the old house built by A. Buck in 1786, 
is now the property of his grandson. When 
cleared and put under cultivation, the prop- 
erty made a good farm. Jeremiah, third, died 
in 185 1. He married E. Sarah Merwin, who 
became the mother of six children, as follows: 
Polly, who was born September 23, 1794; 
Minerva, born November 3, 1798; Caroline, 
born August 5, 1801; David M., born No- 
vember 7, 1804; Delia M., born November 
21, 1 8 10; and Harriet E., born November 8, 
1816. She died in 1859. 

David M. Baldwin, the only son of his par- 
ents, succeeded as such to the ownership of 
the homestead. H^ improved the property to 
a considerable extent, and was a prosperous 
farmer. He was a popular man in the com- 
munity, and served in some of the town ofifices 
with ability. He was originally a Whig and 
later a Republican. He was a member of the 
Congregational church; and he died April 20, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1884. His wife, a daughter of Munson Fair- 
child, became the mother of two children, 
namely: Sarah F., who was born February 
13, 1834, and died July i, 1850; and Andrew 
J., the subject of this sketch. The mother 
died March 3, 1888. 

Andrew J. Baldwin was educated in the dis- 
trict and select schools, and adopted agricult- 
ure as an occupation. He has always re- 
sided at the old homestead, and since 1854 
has occupied the handsome and substantial 
residence his father erected for him at the 
time of his marriage. Alive to the progres- 
sive tendencies of the times, he has made vari- 
ous noticeable improvements in his property. 
He has remodelled the buildings, and has 
added more land to the estate. He pays par- 
ticular attention to the dairying, keeping a 
number of choice cows. The large measure 
of prosperity he is enjoying may be taken as 
the result of his steady perseverance and deter- 
mination to reach the highest degree of per- 
fection in his calling. 

On October 10, 1854, Mr. Baldwin was first 
united in marriage to Delia Merwin. She 
was born in January, 1832, daughter of 
Henry and Susan (Gaylord) Merwin, and died 
December 4, 1872, leaving three children, as 
follows: Henry M., Sarah F., and Mary G. 
The last two died each at the age of seven- 
teen. Mr. Baldwin married for his second 
wife Lucy S. Weaver, who died in 1892, aged 
fifty years. Henry M., the only survivor of 
Mr. Baldwin's children, was born October 10, 
1856. He was well educated, and is now en- 
gaged in teaching school. He also assists his 
father in carrying on the farm. He married 
Lottie C. Ferriss, and has two children, 
namely: Alice, who was born April 16, 1884; 
and Ralph H., born May 15, 1888. His 
father is a Republican in politics and a mem- 
ber of the Congregational church. 



W': 



ILLIAM W. BULL, a retired 
farmer of Plymouth, was born in 
that town, November 28, 18 16, son 
of Benedict and Betsey (Carrington) Bull. 
The family is of Welsh origin; and its pres- 
ent representatives are the descendants of 
Governor Bull, who ruled the colony of Rhode 
Island in 1685. Mr. Bull's grandfather, 
Jabez B. Bull, was born in Milford, Conn., in 
1748, followed the trade of a tailor in his na- 
tive town, and died in 18 17. He married 
Naomi Bristol, born in Milford, April 20, 
1754, who reared six children, of whom 
Benedict, Mr. Bull's father, was the eldest. 
She passed her declining years at the home of 
her son in Plymouth, and died at the age of 
ninety years. Both parents were members of 
the Congregational church, the father having 
been a Deacon for many years. 

Benedict Bull was born in Milford, July 
10, 1 77 1. He acquired the tailor's trade 
from his father, with whom he worked until 
he was twenty-one. He then went to New 
York, where he continued to follow that occu- 
pation. Subsequently, after recovering from 
a severe illness, he shipped as a sailor in the 
merchant service, making voyages to the West 
Indies and points along the coast. This was 
during the turbulent times caused by the un- 
settled state of Europe in the early part of the 
present century, and he was upon three several 
occasions captured by pirates. After follow- 
ing the sea for some twenty years, he in 181 5 
settled in Plymouth, where he purchased a 
farm, which he cultivated successfully for the 
rest of his life. His death occurred in 1852, 
at the age of eighty years. In politics he 
favored the abolitionist movement. He mar- 
ried Betsey Carrington, daughter of Dr. Ed- 
ward and Mrs. (Whittlesey) Carrington, of 
Woodbridge. Dr. Carrington, a physician in 
good practice, subsequently moved to New 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



York. After suffering from a protracted ill- 
ness, he returned to his native State, and died 
in Milford in early manhood, leaving a widow 
and six children. His wife, who was a native 
of Wallingford, Conn., died in Milford. 
Mrs. Benedict Bull became the mother of four- 
teen children, eleven of whom, eight sons and 
three daughters, grew to maturity. Of these 
William W., the subject of this sketch, is the 
only one now living. The mother lived to 
the age of ninety-two, dying in Plymouth in 
1 87 1. Both parents were members of the 
Congregational church. 

William W. Bull received his education in 
the common schools, and was trained to agri- 
cultural duties. Beginning at an early age to 
assist on the farm, he was intrusted with its 
management during his father's declining 
years, and its possession fell to him by inheri- 
tance at his father's death. It comprises two 
hundred acres, and it is desirably located and 
well improved. Mr. Bull devoted his atten- 
tion to general farming and dairying. He 
was particularly successful in the latter vent- 
ure, and made a high reputation as a breeder 
of fine Jersey cattle. He continued farming 
until 1876, when he rented the property, and 
retired to the village, where he now occupies 
a very comfortable and attractive residence, 
situated opposite to the common. In politics 
he was originally an abolitionist, and is now 
a supporter of the Republican party. He has 
S2rved with ability in some of the town 
offices, was a grand juror for several years 
and also Highway Surveyor. 

In 1846 Mr. Bull was united in marriage to 
Sophia P. Buell, his first wife. She was 
born in Simsbury, daughter of Lester Buell; 
and she died in 1874. His second marriage 
was with Mrs. Sarah M. Fenton, daughter of 
Isaac Beach, who was a prosperous farmer of 
the locality known as Northfield, in the town 



of Litchfield. Isaac Beach was born in Wal- 
lingford, Conn., son of John Beach. He 
passed his boyhood and youth in Watertown, 
where he was brought up to farming; and 
in 1822 he settled in Northfield. Here he 
resided for the rest of his life, and died at 
the age of eighty years. He married Maria 
Beecher, daughter of Burr Beecher, of Wood- 
bridge. He and his wife reared eleven chil- 
dren, seven of whom are still living, Mrs. 
Bull being the eldest. The others are: 
George, a resident of Terryville; Edward, 
who resides in Stamford; Albert, a commer- 
cial traveller; Isaac, who resides in Bristol; 
Nancy, who married Amaziah Clark, a me- 
chanic of Terryville; and Elizabeth, who 
married Albert Morse, Deputy Sheriff of 
Bristol. The mother died in Terryville, 
aged eighty years. Sarah M. Beach resided 
in Northfield until she married Elijah Fenton, 
a carriage-maker of Plymouth, who died in 
1871, aged sixty-four years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bull are members of the Congregational 
church, and have been teachers in the Sunday- 
school. Mr. Bull has acted as a Deacon for 
several years, and displays a deep interest in 
church work. He has led a useful and suc- 
cessful life, winning the high esteem of his 
fellow-townsmen. 



NOS BENHAM, a native of Middle- 
bury, New Haven County, Conn., 
whose portrait accompanies this 
sketch, was born September 3, 18 19. He 
was a son of Albe and Sally (Bronson) Ben- 
ham, highly respected citizens of Middlebury, 
and was reared on a farm. Not content to 
pass his life in his native town, when a young 
man he left home for the West, journeying as 
far as the extreme outposts of civilization at 
that time. Like many other Western travel- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



285 



lers, however, he decided that the East 
afforded better opportunities, and, returning, 
was employed for some time as a clerk in 
Springfield, Mass. He then decided to settle 
in Woodbury, Conn., and in 1843 established 
himself in business in this town. He was 
successful as a merchant, and continued in 
business to the time of his decease, November 
I, 1890. 

A man of strict integrity, respected, by all 
with whom he came in contact, while unobtru- 
sive in manner, he yet possessed a force of 
character that commanded success. He united 
with the First Congregational Church in 
1850, and was ever a consistent member and 
a liberal supporter of religious enterprises. 
On September 9, 185 1, he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Emily J. Minor, daughter of 
the Hon. Matthew and Lorena (Bacon) Minor, 
of Woodbury, Conn. 

The Hon. Matthew Minor was born Octo- 
ber 26, 1780. He was a graduate of Yale 
College in the class of 1801, studied law 
under the direction of the Hon. Noah B. 
Benedict, and became one of the leading 
lawyers of Litchfield County. He began prac- 
tice in his native town, and continued in his 
profession until his death, December 17, 
1839. He was a member of the House of 
Representatives in the State legislature in 
1830, 1832, and 1833, and a member of the 
Senate in 1837. He also filled many offices 
of trust in his native town. 




"OWARD M. HICKCOX, Judge of 
Probate at Watertown, was born in 

that town, September 19, i860, 

son of Edward S. and Charlotte (Percy) Hick- 
cox. The Hickcox family was one of the first 
to settle in Watertown ; and th6 great-grand- 
father of Howard M., Caleb Hickcox, who was 



born October 18, 1766, was a large land-owner 
there when the district was sparsely in- 
habited. Caleb died March 9, 181 3, at the 
age of forty-seven; and his wife, whose 
maiden name was Ruth Scoville, born in 
Watertown, March 8, 1773, and died there Jan- 
uary 8, 1859, in her eighty-seventh year. In 
religious belief they were Episcopalians. 
Their son Edward, who was born in Water- 
town, May II, 1794, is the grandfather of 
Howard M. He was a progressive farmer, ac- 
quiring his first knowledge of agriculture on 
his father's farm, which was on the east side 
of the town. About 1823 he purchased a 
large farm on the west side of the town, and 
was for years extensively engaged in breeding 
merino sheep and Devon cattle. He was well 
known throughout the locality, and was par- 
ticularly active in religious matters. He 
died October 16, 1881, in his eighty-eighth 
year. He was twice married. The first time 
was on March 4, 18 19, when he was united to 
Anna Merriman, of Watertown. She was the 
grandmother of Howard M. In his second 
marriage he was wedded to Anna Beecher. 

Edward S. Hickcox, the father of Howard 
M., was born in Watertown, June 21, 1832. 
Reared on a farm, he adopted agriculture as 
his life occupation; and, when he reached his 
majority, he purchased a farm adjoining his 
father's. He was prominent in town affairs, 
and served in various official capacities during 
his short life, which ended when he was 
thirty-three years of age. His wife was a na- 
tive of Woodbury, daughter of Thaddeus and 
Emeline Percy. Her father, who was a 
farmer, lived to be eighty years of age. Mrs. 
Hickcox has now attained her sixtieth year, 
and is living on the homestead. She is a 
member of the Methodist church, in which 
her husband took an active interest. Four 
sons were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hickcox, all 



286 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of whom are now living. They are: F. 
Percy, Howard M., Truman S., and Frank H. 

Howard M. Hickcox was but five years of 
age when his father died. He helped about 
the farm when a boy, and as he grew older 
worked at whatever presented itself. In this 
period he hired by the month to do farm work 
some three or four years. He drove team for 
Cheney Brothers, of Manchester, one summer; 
and he taught school for a year. In 1881 he 
purchased a farm in Watertown, and has since 
resided in Watertown Centre, actively en- 
gaged in general farming. An enterprising 
and energetic man, he has also engaged in 
other business. He entered the ice trade in 
1886, and after five years disposed of his inter- 
est in it at an advantage. He has also been a 
licensed undertaker since 1886. He is ac- 
tively interested in agricultural matters, and 
is a charter member of the Grange, of which 
he was Overseer for two years; and he has 
been Treasurer of the Watertown Agricultural 
Association for seven years. A Republican 
in politics, he has been Selectman one year, 
Tax Collector four years, a member of the 
Board of Relief four years, Clerk of the 
School Board a long time, and Judge of Pro- 
bate since 1890. He is Secretary and Treas- 
urer of the Evergreen Cemetery Association, 
has been superintendent of the cemetery six 
years, and is financial agent for the Water- 
town Library Association. 

In 1 88 1 Mr. Hickcox was married to 
Amelia M. Atwood, only daughter of Eben J. 
Atwood, of Watertown, and grand-daughter of 
Stephen Atwood, a noted merino sheep raiser 
of Woodbury, where Mrs. Hickcox was born. 
Her father died when he was forty-two years 
of age, but her mother is still living. Mr. 
and Mrs. Atwood were esteemed members of 
the Congregational church of Watertown. 
The home of Mr. and Mrs. Hickcox has been 



brightened by four children: Arthur Percy, 
Frank Bronson, Mabelle Merriman, and 
Florence Strong. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hickcox are members of the 
Methodist church, and he for many years has 
been Recording Steward of the society and 
for ten years Treasurer of the Sunday-school. 
He is a man of culture as well as unusual 
business ability, and he takes a deep interest 
in history and biography. 



ISAAC W. BROOKS, of the firm of 
Brooks Brothers, bankers of Torrington, 
a native of this county, was born in 
Goshen, November 8, 1838, this town being 
also the place of nativity of his father. Watts 
H. Brooks, and of his grandfather, Harvey 
Brooks, who was born in 1779. Joseph 
Brooks, the great-grandfather of Isaac W., was 
a native of Durham, Middlesex County, and 
one of the pioneer settlers of Goshen. He 
purchased a tract of wild land, and from it 
cleared and improved a homestead, living 
there until he attained an advanced age. 
Harvey Brooks was reared on the old home 
farm, which he had assisted in reclaiming 
from the wilderness. After his marriage he 
purchased a farm near by; and there, engaged 
in agricultural labors, he lived until 1873, 
when he departed this life at the venerable 
age of ninety-three years. He reared but two 
children, the father of Isaac W. being the 
youngest child. 

Watts H. Brooks while a youth acquired a 
practical knowledge of farming; and, on ar- 
riving at man's estate, he became the owner of 
a valuable farm in Goshen, and was engaged 
in tilling it for many years. A man of un- 
usual intelligence and force of character, he 
was prominent in political and religious 
circles. Besides serving acceptably in vari- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



287 



ous minor offices of the town, he was a member 
of the State legislature three terms. In him 
the Republican party had one of its most 
faithful adherents. He married Mary Wad- 
hams, the daughter of John Wadhams, a 
Goshen farmer, she being one of a family of 
five children. Four children were born of 
their union, three of whom are still living, 
namely: John W., in partnership with Isaac 
W. Brooks; Isaac W. ; and Amanda. The 
mother passed to the next world when but 
sixty-four years of age, and the father at the 
ripe old age of seventy-eight years. 

Isaac W. Brooks in his youth was an apt 
and diligent pupil. After graduating from 
the high school, he entered Goshen Acad- 
emy, where he was fitted for college, subse- 
quently completing his studies at Brown Uni- 
versity. He began life as a merchant, enter- 
ing into business with his brother in a store of 
general merchandise. The brothers had con- 
ducted the store successfully for eleven years, 
when in 1872 they came to Torrington, and 
established their present banking business, 
which they have continued uninterruptedly 
since. This banking firm is one of the oldest 
established in the vicinity. The Messrs. 
Brooks are very skilful financiers. They are 
keen and quick in business affairs, and are 
highly appreciated throughout the community. 
John W., the brother of the subject of this 
sketch, was for three years Insurance Com- 
missioner for the State. In local matters no 
citizen of Torrington takes a more genuine 
interest than Mr. Brooks. He encourages 
and supports all enterprises tending to the 
moral, intellectual, or financial advancement 
of the town or county. Soon after coming 
here, twenty-three years ago, he was elected 
Town Treasurer, and has since been an in- 
cumbent of that office. For four years he was 
Judge of the Probate Court, and for twenty 



years he has been Treasurer of the Torrington 
Savings Bank. In 1878 Mr. Brooks was one 
of three citizens appointed to look into the 
feasibility of introducing water into the town, 
and since the organization of the company 
has been its President. He is also connected 
with other business enterprises in an official 
capacity, and has been a Director of the 
Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance Company of 
Hartford. In 1886 he was appointed one of 
the receivers of the Charter Oak Insurance 
Company of Hartford, a position which took 
up much of his time. Mr. Brooks was elected 
to represent his district in the State legisla- 
ture in 1884 and in 1893, serving as Speaker 
of the House on the last occasion. He has 
travelled extensively, both in this country and 
on the other side of the Atlantic. His 
European trips were made in 1880 and 1893. 
An excellent sketch of Mr. Brooks appears in 
the volume entitled "Representative Men of 
the State of Connecticut," published in 1894. 
He was one of the four men selected by the 
author to represent Litchfield County. 



(sTrUGUSTUS E. BLAKESLEE, the 
JmL genial and accommodating Postmaster 
/<J1b\^^^ of Thomaston, was born in that 
town, then known as Plymouth, on July 22, 
1842, son of Stephen B. and Sarah (Will- 
iams) Blakeslee. He is a descendant of one 
of three brothers who came to this country 
some time in the seventeenth century, and 
settled at North Haven, Conn. 

Micha Blakeslee, great-grandfather of 
Augustus E., was born in North Haven; but 
in his manhood he removed to Plymouth, of 
which place he was one of the pioneer set- 
tlers. Like the majority of the people among 
whom he lived, he followed the occupation of a 
farmer. He also served in the Connecticut 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



State militia; and his commissions of Lieu- 
tenant, Colonel, and Major are still in the 
possession of his great-grandson. His son, 
Marvin Blakeslee, was born in Plymouth. 
At first he engaged in agricultural pursuits, 
but later on he entered the clock-making busi- 
ness. He lived to be eighty-eight years of 
age. His wife, in maidenhood Ruth Graves, 
was born in Harwinton, Conn., daughter of 
one of the early settlers of that place. She 
reared him two sons: Henry B., deceased; 
and Stephen B. At the time of her death, 
which occurred on the same day of the month 
as that of her husband, she had attained the 
age of ninety-two yeai"s. Both spent their 
last years with their grandson. 

Stephen B. Blakeslee passed his boyhood 
upon a farm. He then went into the hotel 
business, purchasing a hotel in Thomaston. 
After six or eight years spent in this occupa- 
tion he went to California with the early 
gold hunters in 1849, and is still a resident of 
that State, being now seventy-five years of 
age. His wife, Sarah (Williams) Blakeslee, 
was the only child of John and Hannah Will- 
iams, of Plymouth. Her father was a cab- 
inet-maker in Plymouth, but during the latter 
part of his life he conducted a hotel in 
Thomaston. He died at the age of forty-eight. 
Mrs. Blakeslee lived only to the age of 
twenty-two years, leaving one child, Augustus 
E. Blakeslee. Both parents were members 
of the Episcopal church. 

Augustus E. Blakeslee, who was but fifteen 
months old at the time of his mother's death, 
lived during his early years with his grand- 
mother. When he was but six years old, his 
father removed to California. He received a 
good practical education in the common 
schools of Thomaston and at the Episcopal 
Academy of Cheshire, Conn. He then went 
to work with the Seth Thomas Clock Com- 



pany; and, beginning as a boy, he worked his 
way up to the position of foreman and con- 
tractor. With the exception of three years 
spent in joiner work he remained with the 
clock company until 1886. In that year he 
received an appointment from President 
Cleveland as Postmaster, and served in that 
position for four years. He then entered the 
employ of the Plume & Atwood Manufactur- 
ing Company in their carpenter department, 
remaining there until 1894, when he was 
again appointed Postmaster. This is a third- 
class office, requiring two clerks and doing a 
large business, having besides its mail depart- 
ment an international money order department. 
In 1867 he was joined in marriage with 
Miss Mary J. Hart; and their union has been 
blessed by the birth of two daughters, 
namely: Ruth Anna, Assistant Postmistress 
in Unionville, Conn. ; and Frances Emeline, 
Assistant Postmistress in Thomaston. In 
politics Mr. Blakeslee is a Democrat. He 
has served as Town Collector for three terms, 
and has also filled the office of Constable. 
He is affiliated with Union Lodge, No. 96, of 
Thomaston, in which he is Past Master; with 
Granite Chapter, No. 36, Royal Arch Masons, 
of Thomaston, of which he is Past High 
Priest ; with the Grand Chapter of Connecti- 
cut, in which he is Past Grand High Priest; 
with Waterbury Council, No. 21; with Clark 
Commandery, No. 7, Knights Templars, of 
Waterbury; with Thomaston Ancient Order 
of United Workmen, No. 4; with Court 
Friendship of the Order of Foresters; and 
with the Knights of Pythias, in which he has 
held the office of Chancellor and Commander. 
Mr. Blakeslee and his family are influential 
members of the Episcopal church, in which 
he has served as organist and Vestryman; 
and his daughters are active workers in the 
Sunday-school. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



289 



KREDERIC E. STARR, First Select- 
man of the town of New Milford, where 
he is successfully engaged in general 
farming and has a good milk route, was born 
in the house in which he now resides, Novem- 
ber 27, 1832, son of Colonel William J. and 
Sarah (Northrop) Starr. The genealogical 
record of the Starr family in this country 
dates back to Dr. Comfort Starr, who emi- 
grated from England in the year i66o. 

Colonel Josiah Starr, the great-grandfather 
of Frederic E., was born in Danbury, Conn., 
about 1740. At the age of twenty-one years 
he came to New Milford, and purchased the 
Paul Welch place, consisting of five acres of 
land, now occupied by the subject of this 
biography. For eighteen sessions prior to 
1802 he was a representative in the General 
Assembly. In 1776 he was appointed Cap- 
tain in the American army, and was afterward 
promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. 
He died in 18 13, seventy-three years of age. 
He married Miss Sarah Mygatt, and of the 
union there were born two sons and two 
daughters; namely, Hannah, Eli, Betsey, and 
Daniel. Their mother died in 1805, sixty- 
five years of age. Eli Starr, who was born on 
March 10, 1763, became the owner of the old 
homestead at his parents' decease. He also 
bought additional land, and engaged in farm- 
ing with good results. Matters pertaining to 
the public welfare always awakened his inter- 
est, and he was in close sympathy with church 
and other religious work. He died on De- 
cember 5, 1835. His wife, Susanna (Hig- 
gins) Starr, who bore him a son and daughter, 
Eliza and William J., died in 185 1. 

William J. Starr, whose birth occurred on 
the old homestead, January 15, 1806, acquired 
his education in the public schools of Dan- 
bury and at Sharon Academy. He inherited 
the old homestead, which has been in the fam- 



ily for over one hundred and thirty years. 
The present house was erected in 1838, upon 
the site of the old one, which it was found 
necessary to demolish. He has rebuilt all 
the other structures connected with the farm, 
and has put up some buildings in the village, 
where he now owns four tenement-houses. In 
early life he engaged in farming, and has fol- 
lowed that avocation since. In company with 
his son he now owns two hundred acres of land 
near the village. He takes a lively interest 
in the progress of New Milford village, and is 
a liberal contributor to the support of church 
work. Although nearly ninety years of age, 
he is still able to read without the assistance 
of glasses, and is out each day attending to 
his business. His marriage with Miss Sarah 
Northrop, a daughter of Cyrus Northrop, took 
place April 15, 1830. She was born Novem- 
ber 9, 1807, and died on February 24, 1883. 
They were the parents of four children, as 
follows: Eliza J., who died in infancy; Fred- 
eric E. ; William E., deceased; and Catherine 
S., the wife of Joseph Bostwick. 

Frederic E. Starr obtained a good practical 
education in the district school and at New 
Milford Academy, after which he went to New 
Haven, and took a course in engineering and 
surveying. For fifteen years afterward he was 
successfully engaged in the business of a 
civil engineer. He is also engaged in farm- 
ing with his father. He has a choice dairy 
farm near the village, where he carries on 
general farming, and keeps a dairy of twenty 
Devonshire cows, which supply the milk for 
the route he has established. Since his 
mother's death, as his father is now advanced 
in years, he sold his surveying business. On 
May 27, 1857, he was joined in marriage with 
Miss Hannah Wanzer, a daughter of William 
Wanzer, a prosperous farmer of this section. 
Three sons and a daughter live to bless their 



290 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



union, namely: William E., of the firm of 
Treat & Starr, who was married on May 25, 
1888, to Miss Carrie C. Johnson, and has one 
child, S. Helen, born March 18, 1889; 
Charles W. , who married Ruth Wells, Octo- 
ber 16, 1890, and owns and conducts a bakery 
in New Milford; Adelaide, who married C. S. 
Perry, of New York, and has one child, 
Eleanor M.; and Frederic E., Jr., the Secre- 
tary of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion of New Milford. In politics Mr. Starr 
is a Republican. For the ten consecutive 
years previous to 1889 he served his town 
very acceptably as Selectman, and in 1894 he 
was elected First Selectman. He and his 
family are influential members of the Congre- 
gational church. 




I LI D. WEEKS, Treasurer of the Na- 
tional Life Underwriters' Association, 
is a well-known life insurance man, 
residing in the village of Bantam, for many 
years an agent of the Phoenix Mutual Insur- 
ance Company of Hartford. He was born in 
Washington, Litchfield County, Conn., No- 
vember 7, 1830, son of Hiram and Lucy 
(Tucker) Weeks. 

Mr. Weeks's father settled on a farm in 
Washington when a young man, and is still 
residing at his homestead. He has been en- 
ergetic and successful; and, although he has 
now reached the advanced age of ninety-four, 
he is still vigorous for one of his years. His 
wife, Lucy Tucker, who died at seventy-five 
years of age, was a native of Washington, 
daughter of Eli Tucker, a well-to-do farmer 
of that town, who was also interested in a 
marble quarry there. Her father died at the 
age of forty, having reared a family of five 
children, two of whom are still living, 
namely: Levi; and Chloe, now a widow, who 



married for her first husband a Mr. Parsons 
Wheeler and for her second Orsen Taylor. 
Of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Hiram 
Weeks three still survive, namely: Eli D., 
the subject of this sketch; Esther, who mar- 
ried Lewis Hart; and Emma, who married 
Oliver Evits. 

Eli D. Weeks acquired his education in 
the district' schools and at the Gunnery in his 
native town. He learned the trade of a car- 
riage-maker, and subsequently continued that 
occupation with Smith & Hatch in New 
Preston, later working in Milton. Returning 
to New Preston, he started in the carriage- 
making business with a partner, under the 
firm name of Weeks & Burnham; and, after 
relinquishing that enterprise, he came to Ban- 
tam, and was employed as a journeyman by 
Frederick Morse. The factory being pur- 
chased by a Mr. Smedley, Mr. Weeks took 
charge of the business for a year; and, when 
Mr. Smedley sold out, Mr. Weeks organized 
the Litchfield Carriage Company, of which he 
was secretary and general manager for five 
years. In 1878 he retired from that concern, 
and connected himself with the Phoenix 
Mutual Life Insurance Company of Hartford. 
As a general agent of that well-known com- 
pany he has won an enviable reputation as an 
able and successful business man. He was 
President of the Connecticut Life Under- 
writers' Association in 1894, and Vice-Presi- 
dent of the National Association, and a mem- 
ber of the Special Committee upon Finance in 
1894-95, and is now, December, 1895, Treas- 
urer of the National Life Underwriters' Asso- 
ciation. 

Mr. Weeks is a Democrat in politics, and 
is a prominent party leader in his section. 
He served as a member of the School Board 
for several years, and has held other impor- 
tant town offices. He represented his town 




ELI D. WEEKS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



293 



in the legislature in 1867 and 1877, in the 
latter year being on the Insurance' Committee. 
He was for some years on the local Demo- 
cratic Committee, and is at the present time a 
member of the State Central Committee from 
the Twentieth Senatorial District of Connecti- 
cut. He has advanced in Masonry to the 
Royal Arch degree, and is a member of St. 
Paul's Lodge, of which he was Master two 
years, and also of Darius Chapter. 

In 1856 Mr. Weeks married Maria T. Brad- 
ley, daughter of Augustus Bradley, a former 
resident of Litchfield. Mrs. Weeks's great- 
grandfather, Aaron Bradley, was a tavern- 
keeper of Bradleyville, which is now Bantam. 
He was a leading business man and a promi- 
nent citizen in his day, and highly respected 
for his many worthy traits of character. He 
married Lorin Abernathy, a relative of Judge 
Abernatby, of Bridgeport, Conn. Mrs. 
Weeks's grandfather, Horace Bradley, owned a 
farm in Bradleyville, which was situated di- 
rectly opposite his father's tavern. He later 
moved to Chenango Coimty, New York, where 
he passed the remainder of his life, and died 
at the age of eighty years. He occupied a 
prominent position in the community, and 
was an esteemed and useful citizen. He mar- 
ried Hannah Twitchell, who lived to an ad- 
vanced age, having reared nine children, four 
of whom are still living. 

Augustus Bradley, Mrs. Weeks's father, 
was born in Litchfield, and passed his earlier 
years in that town. In 1859 he purchased a 
farm in Chenango County, New York, upon 
which he spent the rest of his life. He died 
at the. age of seventy-eight. He married 
Julia Clemans, only daughter of Harvey 
demons, of Litchfield. Her father was an 
early settler in Bantam, and lived to be nearly 
eighty-two years old. Mrs. Augustus Bradley 
died at seventy-eight years of age. She was 



the mother of five children, as follows: Helen, 
who married Thomas Dickinson; Maria T., 
who is now Mrs. Weeks; Anna, who married 
Lewis C. Hotchkiss, a prosperous farmer of 
Litchfield; Henry A.; and Julia A., who 
married Nelson Bennett. Mrs. Weeks's par- 
ents were members of the Universalist church. 
Mr. and Mrs. Weeks are communicants of 
the Episcopal church, of which he is the 
Senior Warden. They occupy a most desir- 
able residence, situated upon an elevation 
overlooking the village, which he erected in 
1891. The excellent portrait of Mr. Weeks 
accompanying this sketch of his career is sure 
to be widely recognized and appreciated, as 
he is, without doubt, one of the best-known 
life insurance agents in Connecticut. 



7^ HESTER THOMAS, the veteran car- 
I Vp riage trimmer of Bantam, Conn., was 
V ^ ^ born in Woodbridge, New Haven 
County, April 18, 18 19, son of Perley and 
Elmira (Addiss) Thomas. His father was a 
native of Woodbridge, and was there brought 
up on a farm. Later he moved to Litchfield, 
where he purchased a small piece of property, 
and followed the trade of a shoemaker until 
his death, which occurred when he was thirty- 
eight years of age. His wife, Elmira Addiss, 
one of the thirteen children of Thomas 
Addiss, a prosperous farmer of Litchfield, 
died at the age of fifty-eight years. She was 
the mother of four sons, who all grew to man- 
hood and became identified with the carriage- 
maker's trade, and of whom Chester, the sub- 
ject of this sketch, is the only survivor. 

Chester Thomas resided, with his mother 
until reaching the age of thirteen, when he 
went to Hartford to work on a farm. At six- 
teen he began to learn the carriage trimmer's 
trade, and in 1841 he came to Litchfield. He 



29 + 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was employed as a journeyman by William 
Rogers for nineteen years, during which time 
he purchased a residence on Lake Street; and 
for the succeeding thirteen years he worked 
for a carriage company in Torrington. Re- 
turning to Litchfield, he bought some stock in 
the Litchfield Carriage Company, whose fac- 
tory was located in Bantam; and, selling his 
Litchfield residence, he erected his present 
comfortable home, which is one of the finest 
houses in the village of Bantam. When the 
firm of Flynn & Doyle established their pres- 
ent business, Mr. Thomas was secured for the 
trimming department; and he has since re- 
mained with them. He has been a practical 
carriage trimmer for sixty years, and is with- 
out doubt the oldest representative of that 
trade in the State. Mr. Thomas is a Repub- 
lican in politics. He is a Master Mason, and 
has been a member of the Lodge in Litchfield 
for many years. 

Mr. Thomas has been twice married. His 
first wife, whom he wedded in 1841, was 
Jane Waters, daughter of Chauncey Waters, 
a carpenter and farmer of Hartford, Conn., 
and by this union there were three children, 
namely: Charles, who became a soldier in 
the Civil War, and died soon after leav- 
ing Libby Prison; Mary, who died aged 
thirty years; and Edward, who still survives. 
Edward Thomas enlisted as a private in the 
Nineteenth Connecticut Regiment, and served 
until the close of the war. He is now 
connected with a boot and shoe establish- 
ment in Newark, N.J., where he has resided 
for the past thirty years. He married for his 
first wife Annie Churchill, and had by this 
union one daughter, Cora, who married 
Charles Garribrane. His first wife died at 
the age of twenty-sev.en ; and he married a 
second wife, by whom he has five children. 

Mr. Chester Thomas's first wife having died, 



he wedded for his second wife Catherine 
Smith, a native of Ireland, daughter of Sir 
Frank and Lady Rosa (Fox) Smith. Sir 
Frank Smith died at the age of thirty-five 
years, leaving five children, three of whom are 
still living: Catherine, Christopher, and Isa- 
bella. After the death of her husband. Lady 
Smith came to the United States, where she 
resided for a few years, and then returned to 
Ireland. She died at the age of seventy- 
seven years. In religion she was an Episco- 
palian. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas have two chil- 
dren, namely : Edith, who married Charles 
Flynn, of Litchfield, and has one daughter, 
Maude; and William Chester, who married 
Mary Gladding, and has two children, Cath- 
erine and Kenneth. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
attend the Episcopal church. 




RI CHURCH, for many years a promi- 
nent agriculturist of Winchester and 
one of the representative citizens 
of the town, being the son of John Church, a 
pioneer of the locality, was born on August 
4, 1792- 

John Church was born in Connecticut, the 
historical town of Saybrook being the native 
place of both himself and his father, Simeon 
Church, the latter being a lifelong resident. 
John with two older brothers served three 
years in the Revolutionary army, being under 
Arnold at Quebec and later at Saratoga. In 
1780 the marriage of John Church and Deb- 
orah Spencer was solemnized in the town of 
Chester, then included in the limits of Say- 
brook, that having been the place of nativity 
of the bride. The young couple, who had 
previously decided on building up for them- 
selves a home in more newly settled regions, 
started on horseback for Winchester, a jour- 
ney of sixty miles, taking nearly two days to 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



295 



perform. A few years later the wife made 
her first visit to her old home in Chester, 
going and returning as she first came, on 
horseback, carrying a baby the whole distance 
in her arms. 

John Church on reaching Winchester soon 
purchased a tract of uncleared land, which ex- 
tended for a considerable distance around the 
shore of Crystal Lake, and which included 
the land on the north shore, where now the 
water coming through the Gilbert Tunnel 
flows into the lake. On a slope of land on 
the east side, in full view of the lake and 
about eighty rods distant from it, a log house 
was built : and here house-keeping was com- 
menced, this being the first home of the 
Church family in Winchester. They lived in 
the log house for eight years. In the mean 
time another tract of wooded land a half mile 
further north was purchased ; and on this was 
erected a frame house, which overlooked the 
Mad River valley. In the spring of 1788 
the family moved into the new house, which 
is still standing, with quite an enlargement 
subsequently added to the first, the entire 
building being a real type of primitive archi- 
tecture. Like all uncultivated lands, this 
large tract needed much labor to bring it 
under cultivation; and the young farmer, 
anxious to succeed, set himself at once to work 
felling trees, clearing away timber, brush, 
and stumps, ploughing and planting, setting 
out fruit trees, and with his characteristic 
energy and perseverance making other needed 
improvements. Meadows, too, must be brought 
into grass for winter's hay; and, needing grass 
seed to sow, he went into New York State 
to buy. Seed was brought home and sowed, 
he not knowing that with the grass seed were 
mixed a few seeds of the ox-eye daisy, so that, 
when the grass began to grow, to the farmer's 
great surprise and dismay there also appeared 



here and there a daisy plant; and from this 
seed-sowing has been dated by the older in- 
habitants the first introduction of daisies into 
the town of Winchester. But, if true, Mr. 
Church did his best to eradicate and prevent a 
further spreading over the land; for he had 
such a dislike to the weed that his boys used 
to say that, if their father spied a daisy plant 
in any meadow, he sent one of them at once 
to dig up and destroy it, saying, " No grass 
can ever grow with daisies." But the 
whitened fields in June of to-day, a hundred 
years later, show that a few plants must have 
escaped his notice and been left to ripen, 
their seeding from year to year producing 
fully its hundredfold. Mr. John Church 
cleared a large farm, and continued to till the 
soil until the time of his decease, December 
6, 1834, being among the most successful 
farmers of this part of the county! He and 
his wife enjoyed more than a half-century of 
wedded life on earth, and in going hence were 
not long separated, her death occurring but 
thirty-six hours before his own. Their bodies 
were laid to rest in the same grave. They 
reared a family of eight children; namely, 
Hannah, Eunice, Jonathan,. Isaac, David, 
Uri, Lucy, and Wealthy. 

Uri Church was a young man of fine mental 
ability. He was given excellent educational 
advantages, and began his career as a teacher 
in the district schools of New York State. 
On his return to Winchester Mr. Church 
bought a farm on the east side of Mad River, 
and lived there for a short time. He subse- 
quently disposed of that property, and pur- 
chasing land on the west side of the river, 
about a mile and a half above Winsted, 
erected substantial frame buildings, which oc- 
cupy a beautiful site, overlooking the Mad 
River valley. On this farm he engaged in 
general agriculture, adding from year to year 



.96 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



to the improvement of the estate, making it 
his permanent abiding-place until called from 
earth on August 12, 1856. He was a man of 
excellent business tact and good judgment, 
possessing sterling virtues that rendered him 
a valued citizen, a desirable neighbor, and one 
of the best of friends. He was united in mar- 
riage December 18, 1822, with Miss Eliza 
Brooks, a native of Chester, a daughter of 
Simeon and Lois (Church) Brooks. Mrs. 
Church passed to the higher life June 17, 
i860, leaving the only child of their union, 
Amanda E. Church, who has succeeded to the 
ownership of the valuable estate, now called 
the Mountain Home Farm. Here she resides, 
surrounded by all the comforts of life, taking 
much pleasure in her library of choice books 
and the companionship of congenial friends. 



J ^TeORGE W. ANTHONY, the pro- 
y^J prietor of a successful laundry in 
New Milford, was born in Newtown, 
Conn., October 9, 1837, son of John H. and 
Alice A. (Walker) Anthony. William An- 
thony, the grandfather of George W., who 
was born in Providence, R.I., was for many 
years successfully engaged in the manufacture 
of hats, making a specialty of silk hats. At 
his death, which occurred in Providence, he 
left two sons and three daughters; namely, 
Henry E., Mary, Abbie, Amanda, and 
John H. 

John H. Anthony, the youngest son of his 
parents, was born in Providence, R.I. Hav- 
ing learned early in life to make horn combs, 
he availed of the first opportunity to start for 
himself in that industry in Sandy Hook, 
Conn. Afterward he worked for a number of 
years as a journeyman. In 1862 he enlisted 
for service in the civil strife with Company E 
of the Fifteenth Connecticut Volunteers, and 



served until honorably discharged on account 
of ill health. He died in New Milford, 
seventy-six years of age. His wife, Alice A. 
(Walker) Anthony, who was born in Plain- 
field, Conn., bore him the following children; 
George Walker; Joseph Henry, who died in 
childhood; Helen J., the wife of G. H. 
Lines; John Henry, Jr., who enlisted in 
1864 in Company G of Engineer Corps, First 
Regiment of New York Volunteers; and 
William A., residing in Worcester, Mass. 

When but twelve years old, George W. An- 
thony left home to live with James Fitts, a 
manufacturer of woollen cloth and satinets. 
He remained with Mr. Fitts for four years, 
during which time he attended the winter 
school. He then obtained a position as clerk 
in a hotel at Brookfield, Conn., where he was 
employed for eight years. Following that he 
conducted a hotel, and later on took a posi- 
tion as station agent and telegraph operator, 
which he retained for five years. In 1868 he 
came to New Milford, and entered into part- 
nership with A. H. McMahon. The firm of 
Anthony & McMahon did a thriving business 
in stoves, tinware, paints, oils, and agricult- 
ural implements for sixteen years. At the 
end of that space of time Mr. Anthony sold 
his interest to Mr. McMahon, and in company 
with D. E. Soule and H. Schovrerling erected 
a large three-story building, in which they 
began the manufacture of ivory buttons in 
1884. Here a very successful business was 
carried on until July 15, 1889, when the fac- 
tory was destroyed by fire. Four days after 
Mr. Anthony was appointed Postmaster. He 
served in that capacity for four years, in the 
course of which time he fitted up the finely 
equipped office the town now possesses, and 
which is by far the best it has ever had. At 
the expiration of his term of office he pur- 
chased the old fire-engine house, put in it a 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



297 



fine Troy steam laundry equipment, and in a 
short time built up a large trade, not only in 
New Milford, but in all the surrounding towns. 
On August 25, 1862, he enlisted in Company 
C, Twenty-third Regiment, Connecticut Vol- 
unteer Infantry. Although he started as a 
private in the ranks, when it was found that 
he was a competent drummer, he was given an 
instrument, and from that time served with 
the musicians. On January 23, 1863, he was 
taken prisoner at Fort Buchanan. He was 
mustered out on August 31, 1863, after thir- 
teen months of faithful service. 

In 1864 he was united in marriage with 
Miss Laura C. McMahon, a daughter of 
George and Laura C. (Hill) McMahon. 
They lost one child in infancy. They have 
one son living, Wesley Morton, born May 29, 
1868, who is associated with his father in the 
laundry business, and is married to Miss Jo- 
sephine A. Mead, a d'aughter of John A. and 
Josephine (Beardsley) Mead. 

Mr. Anthony is a stanch Republican. He 
served two years as Deputy Sheriff, has held 
the offices of Assessor and Tax Collector, and 
has been a member of the Board of Relief. 
While acting as Deputy Sheriff, it fell to his 
lot to arrest seven horse thieves. Among 
these was Oliver Wood, who stole a horse in 
Bedford, N.Y., was arrested in Massachusetts, 
and brought to New Milford for trial, and 
sentenced to ten years' imprisonment. For 
his services on this occasion Mr. Anthony re- 
ceived one hundred dollars' reward from the 
owner of the horses, besides his regular fees. 
For fifteen years he has been a Director of the 
New Milford Savings Bank. He is one of 
the sixteen charter members of the New Mil- 
ford Water Company, incorporated for supply- 
ing New Milford with wholesome water. 
Among the fraternal orders with which he is 
connected are St. Peter's Lodge, No. 21, 



A. F. & A. M. ; Housatonic Chapter, No. 33, 
Royal Arch Masons; the Knights of Honor; 
and Upton Post, No. 14, Grand Army of the 
Republic, of which he is Commander. Mr. 
and Mrs. Anthony are influential members of 
St. John's Episcopal Church of New Milford. 
They reside on South Main Street, where he 
owns a fine house and barn. 



If; 



ILLIAM F. ABELING, of Tor- 
ngton, who owns and manages a 
large saw-mill and a cider-mill, was 
born in Sommerfeld, Germany, November 23, 
1849, son of Julius and Augusta (Milisch) 
Abeling, both natives of Germany. Julius 
Abeling was a manufacturer of woollen cloth 
in Germany in his early manhood. In 1869 
he came to America, and settled in Torring- 
ton, obtaining employment in a woollen-mill, 
where he worked until advancing age necessi- 
tated his retirement. He is now seventy- 
three years old, and is living with a daughter 
in Torrington. His wife was the daughter of 
Traugott Milisch, a wealthy citizen of Som- 
merfeld, Germany, who lived in the troublous 
times of Napoleon Bonaparte. When the 
great conqueror passed through that section, 
he pillaged the town so thoroughly that no 
financial resources were left. At the time he 
was exiled to St. Helena, Herr Milisch, who 
had replenished the town's empty treasury 
several times during the war, had not even 
the means to carry on his business. When he 
died, in 1837, he had little to bequeath his 
three children. Mrs. Abeling was fatally 
burned by the overturning of a kerosene lamp, 
December 24, 1890. She and her husband 
were members of the German Lutheran church 
in the Fatherland; and, when they became 
residents of Torrington, they joined the Con- 
gregational denomination, whose teachings 



298 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



most nearly resembled those of their former 
church. They were the parents of eight chil- 
dren, five of whom are living, namely: Her- 
man H., who is employed in the brass foundry 
of the Coe Brothers, Torrington; William F., 
the subject of this sketch; Otto, a mining 
engineer in British Columbia; Charles, a 
wood-turner in Meriden, Conn. ; and Martha, 
who married Jacob Fritz, an employee in the 
Torrington Needle Factory. 

William F. Abeling received his education 
in Germany, and came to this country when a 
youth of nineteen. Familiar with the manu- 
facture of woollen cloth in Germany, where 
he worked for his father, on settling in Tor- 
rington he was able to take employment in 
the woollen-mill. After a while he went to 
work for the Union Hardware Company, in 
whose employ he remained seven years, travel- 
ling at intervals through the United States, 
studying the country and the ways of the 
people. His next venture was in the wood- 
turning business at Burlington, Conn. ; but 
this shop burned down after eight months, 
whereupon he purchased the place he now 
owns. Situated about a mile and a quarter 
from the village of Torrington, it has proved 
a favorable site for his business. The saw- 
mill was first erected. The cider-mill was 
not built until some time after. Mr. Abeling 
is also an artist of fine crayon drawings. He 
has sketched the view of Torrington from the 
hillside twice with good success; and, if he 
lives, he will take another sketch of that town 
in 1900. His undertakings have turned out 
very successfully, and he is now one of the 
wealthiest men of Torrington. His resi- 
dence, which he erected in 1894, is the finest 
house on the street, and is equipped with all 
modern conveniences. 

In 1880 Mr. Abeling was married to Rosa 
Beecher, of Torrington, daughter of David 



Beecher, a farmer, who is now in Minnesota. 
Mrs. Abeling was born in Germany, but has 
lived in America since she was eight years of 
age. She was one of seven children. Her 
brothers and sisters are located as follows: 
Augusta, who married Clemence Katzele, 
lives in Minnesota; David is in the employ of 
the Union Hardware Company, and lives in 
Winchester, Conn. ; Fred is a farmer in Win- 
chester, but works also with his brother for 
the Union Hardware Company; Emil like- 
wise is in the employ of that company; Emma 
is with her father in Minnesota; and Julia 
is with her brother in Winchester. Mrs. 
Abeling's mother died in Minnesota in her 
fifty-fourth year. She was a member of the 
German Lutheran church. Mrs. Abeling bore 
her husband five children: Annie, Adele, 
Elsie, Theodore, and Rheinhardt. 

In politics Mr. Abeling is independent, 
favoring the Republican party. He has been 
Auditor of the German Aid Society since his 
election to membership. He attends the Ger- 
man Lutheran church, of which his wife and 
family are members. Mr. Abeling is a well- 
read man, with a thorough understanding of 
current topics, and is highly respected in the 
community of which he is a member. 



tILEY IVES, a retired manufacturer 
and one of the oldest residents of 
_^ Plymouth, was born in that town 
January 15, 1809, son of Truman and Eunice 
(Peck) Ives. Mr. Ives's grandfather, El- 
nathan Ives, was an early settler of Plymouth, 
where he owned a good farm, which he culti- 
vated successfully for many years. He was a 
sturdy, patriotic citizen, and served as a sol- 
dier in the Revolutionary War. He lived to 
the age of ninety-four years. 

Truman Ives, Mr. Ives's father, was born in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



299 



Plymouth, and resided at the homestead until 
he attained his majority. He then went to 
New York State, where he was employed in 
surveying for a time. Returning again to 
Plymouth, he purchased a farm, and thereafter 
was chiefly occupied in cultivating it. He 
was well known to his neighbors, was esteemed 
by them for his general intelligence and readi- 
ness to serve the community, and died at 
the age of ninety-four years. His wife, in 
maidenhood Eunice Peck, who was a native of 
Bethany, became the mother of eight children, 
four sons and four daughters. Of these the 
only survivors are: Betsey, wife of Henry D. 
Stanley, of Plainville ; and Riley, the subject 
of this sketch. An elder sister died in Au- 
gust, 189s, aged ninety -four years The 
mother also lived to the age of ninety-four, 
dying at the homestead in Plymouth. Both 
parents were members of the Congregational 
church. 

Riley Ives was educated in the common 
schools of Plymouth, and assisted his father in 
carrying on the farm. On reaching the age of 
twenty-one he went to Terryville, where he 
entered the employ of a clock manufacturer. 
Here by his cleverness as a mechanic he 
worked his way step by step until he became 
superintendent of some of the departments. 
He remained in that business for ten years, 
and then bought a farm, which he worked to 
good advantage for several years. However, 
he finally relinquished farming, and once more 
engaged in the business of mechanician, mak- 
ing steel springs; but later he invented and 
manufactured musical devices for toy purposes. 
The enterprise proved profitable, and he car- 
ried it on until his retirement. 

Mr. Ives has been twice married. His first 
wife, whom he married in 1834, was before 
marriage Mary A. Judd, of Qrange, Conn. 
She reared two children, namely: Catherine 



A., who is no longer living; and Edward R., 
a toy and novelty manufacturer of Bridgeport. 
The latter married Jennie M. Blakeslee, 
daughter of Joel Blakeslee, of Plymouth, and 
has had six children, four of whom are living; 
namely, Harry C, Alice I., Edward L., and 
Royal M. Catherine Ives married Arthur 
Blakeslee, and left one daughter, named Ade- 
line, who became the wife of Augustus J. Du 
Bois, of Yale College. Mr. Ives's first wife 
died at the age of thirty years, and he wedded 
for his second wife Julia S. Stoughton. She 
is a daughter of Andrew and Julia (Hooker) 
Stoughton, the former of whom was a native 
and a prosperous farmer of Plymouth, who 
died at the age of fifty-four. His wife, Julia 
Hooker, was a native of Bristol and a de- 
scendant of the old Hooker family that was 
prominent in the early history of the colony. 
Andrew Stoughton raised a family of eight 
children, five of whom are living, and are as 
follows: Julia S., who is now Mrs. Ives; 
Catherine, who became Mrs. Ansel Gaylord, 
and is now a widow; George A., who resides 
in Thomaston ; Ira H. ; and Justin 0. The 
mother died in Terryville, aged eighty-six 
years. By his second union Mr. Ives has one 
son, namely: Charles A., a resident of Bridge- 
port, who is married and has children. Mr. 
Ives is a Republican in politics, but has never 
aspired to public office. He has been a very 
successful business man, and is now passing 
his time in ease and tranquillity at his pleasant 
home, having the hearty good will of his 
neighbors. Both he and his wife are members 
of the Congregational church. 



p)|'ENRY C. STEVENS, of East 
"^ Canaan, superintendent of furnaces 
.s ^__^for the Barnum, Richardson Com- 
pany, was born in Sheffield, Mass., October 



300 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



24, 1829, son of Jonathan and Roxana (Dun- 
ham) Stevens. Mr. Stevens's paternal grand- 
father was Stephen Stevens, a lifelong resi- 
dent of Sheffield. His son, Jonathan, Mr. 
Stevens's father, was born in Sheffield, and 
was reared to agricultural pursuits. He pur- 
chased a farm adjoining the old homestead, 
and followed farming for a time, but relin- 
quished that occupation to enter mercantile 
business, in which he was engaged for a 
period of twelve years. At the expiration of 
that time he resumed his former calling, and 
in addition operated a saw and grist mill and 
a thrashing machine. Jonathan Stevens died 
in Winsted, December 14, 1875, at the age of 
eighty-four years. His wife, Roxana Dun- 
ham, was a daughter of William Dunham, of 
Canaan. She became the mother of ten chil- 
dren, as follows: Elmira J.; Ensign D. ; 
William S.; Ashel D. ; Dennis W. ; Henry 
C, the subject of this sketch; Laura M. ; Ed- 
ward C; Roxana D.; and Herbert, who 
died in childhood. The mother died in Jan- 
uary, 1883, at the age of eighty-six years. 

Henry C. Stevens was educated in the 
schools of his native town, and after complet- 
ing his studies he learned the carpenter's 
trade. He has followed that occupation the 
greater part of his life, and is well known as 
a skilful and reliable workman. He con- 
structed the furnaces for the Barnum, Richard- 
son Company of Canaan, also those at Miller- 
ton, N.Y., and Lime Rock, Conn., and for 
the past fifteen years has been superintendent 
of that department at the company's works. 
Mr. Stevens is the owner of a valuable piece 
of farm property, consisting of one hundred 
and forty acres. He has been active in pub- 
lic affairs, having served as a member of the 
Board of Selectmen in 1861; and he is a 
member of the local agricultural society, of 
which he was the first master and an incorpo- 



rator. In 1858 Mr. Stevens was united in 
marriage to Antoinette Stevens, daughter of 
Nathaniel Stevens, of Canaan, and has one 
son, Nathaniel S. by name, who is now en- 



gaged in teaching school. 



/^TeORGE D. WORKMAN, President 

\J5| and largest stockholder of the War- 
renton Woollen Company at Torring- 

ton, Conn., was born July 23, 1835, in 
Gloucestershire, England, where his father, 

Samuel Workman, son of James, was born, 
bred, and married. James spent the larger 
part of his long life in England, his native 
country, being there employed in a mill, but 
eventually came to America. He made his 
home in Torrington, dying at the venerable 
age of eighty-four years. 

Samuel Workman emigrated with his family 
to this country in 1836. He had previously 
worked in a woollen-mill, was there employed 
for a time, and after his arrival in New York 
City he worked as a wool grader. The follow- 
ing winter he came to Torrington, here begin- 
ning work as a wool sorter in a mill, continu- 
ing thus engaged for some years. Having 
by industry and economy saved considerable 
money, he purchased an interest in what was 
then known as the Union Manufacturing Com- 
pany, and in 1865 bought still more of the same 
stock, becoming its largest owner. He con- 
tinued as wool buyer for the establishment until 
1861. He died in 1879, at the age of three- 
score and ten years. The maiden name of his 
wife, who died in Torrington at the venerable 
age of eighty-three years, was Caroline Frank- 
lin. She was a native of Gloucestershire, 
England, where their marriage was solemnized. 
They reared five children; namely, James S. 
(deceased), Annie, George D., John, and Caro- 
line. Another child, Henry, died in infancy. 




GEORGE D. WORKMAN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



303 



George D. Workman was an infant when he 
came with his parents to this country, where 
he received his education. He remained at 
home through the days of his youth and man- 
hood, and when the infirmities of age began to 
creep upon his parents he devoted himself to 
their care, and has succeeded tO the ownership 
of the old homestead, where he still resides. 
On leaving school Mr. Workman entered the 
mill, and under his father's wise instruction 
became familiar with the practical part of the 
woollen business, and at length took his 
father's place as wool buyer for the company, 
continuing in that position until 1872. En- 
tering the office in that year, he was made 
agent and treasurer of tbe company, and 
proved so competent a manager of affairs that 
in 1886 he was elected president of the 
company. 

The plant was established as a woollen-mill 
on its present site as early as 1820, and has 
always made a fine grade of goods, formerly 
manufacturing an excellent quality of doeskin 
cloth. This company, now under the leader- 
ship of Mr. Workman, with his brother John 
as treasurer and his nephew, Samuel C, as 
secretary, was changed in 1894 from the 
Union Manufacturing Company to the Warren- 
ton Woollen Company, and is engaged in the 
manufacture of superior woollen material, de- 
signed expressly for making policemen's and 
military uniforms of every description. The 
company carries on an extensive business, giv- 
ing employment to a force of one hundred or 
more hands, it being one of the substantial 
and leading industries of this thriving manu- 
facturing village. 

Enterprising, liberal-minded, and upright 
and honorable in all his dealings, Mr. Work- 
man'has the respect and esteem of the entire 
community. Pie worships at the Episcopal 
church, of which his parents were prominent 



members, his father having been one of the 
organizers of that society and very influential 
in its support and management. 

A portrait of Mr. George D. Workman ac- 
companies these brief biographical notes. 



/3!)eORGE p. crane. Deputy Sheriff 
V i I of Litchfield County and one of the 

leading citizens of Woodbury, was 
born in New Milford, January 14, 1837, son of 
Henry S. and Betsey J. (Bishop) Crane. He 
belongs to an old Connecticut family, tracing 
his descent from Benjamin Crane, of Wethers- 
field, one of the first settlements in the State. 
Joseph Crane, a descendant of Benjamin, had 
a son Stephen, who was the great-grandfather 
of George P. Crane. He settled in New Mil- 
ford, marrying Mary Chapman, of that town, 
whose father, a blacksmith, was a commissary 
of artillery at the time of the Revolution. 
Stephen Crane died May 10, 1814; and his 
wife passed from life ten years later. Their 
children were named: Ezra, Abigail, Isaac, 
Stephen, Noah, Mary, Joseph, Thalia, Jared, 
Baldwin, Sally, Irad, and Ann. Stephen 
Crane, Jr., grandfather of George P., settled 
on Pumpkin Hill, New Milford, and was one 
of the leading farmers of his day, occupying a 
prominent place in the community. A Demo- 
crat in politics, he took a prominent part in 
public affairs. He acted as Trial Justice and 
filled other important offices, and he died in 
New Milford at an advanced age. He was 
twice married. His first marriage was with 
Hannah Baldwin. She left the following 
children: Susan, Anna B., David B., Laura, 
Arma, and Horace. His second wife, Chloe 
(Averill) Crane, of Washington, Conn., bore 
him seven children; namely, Heman, Henry 
S., Hannah M., George E., Mary, Caroline 
M., and Jennette. 



304 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Henry S. Crane, the father of George P., 
was born in New Milford, Conn., June i6, 
i8i I. When a young man he was successfully 
engaged in general farming in New Milford 
for some years. He afterward bought a farm 
in Warren, Conn., which he disposed of later 
in order to purchase an estate in Woodbury. 
He died in the latter town, April 22, 1858. 
His wife, who was born July 19, 1810, in New 
Milford, was a daughter of Nathan Bishop, a 
well-to-do farmer. She died June 2, 1884. 
Their children were: Horace B., born August 
5, 1834; George P., the subject of this arti- 
cle; and Stephen H., born September 6, 1843. 

George P. Crane received a good common- 
school education. Reared on a farm, it was 
natural that he chose agriculture for his life 
occupation. He purchased a small farm 
shortly after attaining his majority. Besides 
tilling the soil he engaged in cattle dealing, 
buying in New York and Canada and driving 
the animals to Connecticut for sale. In 1874 
he bought the Benedict farm in the village of 
Woodbury; and some time later he purchased 
the pleasant home on Main Street where he 
now resides, then known as the L. J. Allen 
place. Mr. Crane is now practically retired 
from agricultural pursuits, giving all his time 
and attention to his public duties. A Repub- 
lican in politics, he has taken part in the town 
government as Constable, First Selectman, and 
in other important capacities. He represented 
Woodbury in the legislature in 1870, and is 
now serving his second term as Deputy Sheriff 
of the county. On January 15, 1861, Mr. 
Crane was united in marriage with Susan C, 
daughter of Thomas and Wealthy (Allen) 
Root, of Woodbury. Mrs. Crane also belongs 
to an old New England family, being a de- 
scendant of Thomas Root, of Salem, Mass., 
who came from England in 1636. From him 
the line is traced through Josiah, Joseph, and 



Thomas to Joseph Root, who was born in 
Woodbury, Conn., May 7, 1761, and married 
Abigail Hurd. This couple were the grand- 
parents of Mrs. Crane. Their son, Thomas 
Root, her father, was born in Woodbury, May 
9, 1 79 1, and there sioent his life, profitably 
engaged in farming. Mr. and Mrs. Crane 
have reared the following children: Henry R., 
born August 14, 1863, a produce merchant of 
Oakland, Cal., who married Louise Hille- 
brand; George H., born April 15, 1869, a 
book-keeper, who married September 6, 1893, 
Lilla Munson, and lives in Waterbury, Conn. ; 
and Stephen T., born September 15, 1872, 
a book-keeper of Waterbury. 

Mr. Crane takes an active interest in educa- 
tional progress. He is a Trustee of the Con- 
necticut School for Boys at Meriden. He is 
also a member of the Masonic fraternity, and 
is Past Master of King Solomon's Lodge, No. 
7, of Woodbury. In religious belief he is a 
Congregationalist. 




EV. JOHN P. HAWLEY, who dur- 
ing the past seven years has faithfully 
ministered to the spiritual needs of 
the Congregational church of New Hartford, 
Conn., and has won the respect and esteem of 
the people of this community, was born in 
Norfolk, Litchfield County, on April 24, 
1833. His parents were Philo and Alma 
(Wheeler) Hawley, the former of whom was 
also a native of Norfolk. 

His paternal grandfather, Elisha Hawley, 
was born in Simsbury, Hartford County. 
After acquiring his education he was engaged 
for several years in teaching school. In Nor- 
folk, where he taught for a time, he met the 
young lady who afterward became his wife and 
the mother of nine children, one being Philo, 
who is named above. Philo Hawley grew to 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3°S 



manhood on his father's farm. He then trav- 
elled through a portion of the Southern States 
on business ; and later on he opened a store in 
Charleston, S. C, where he spent his winters 
for a number of years, his summers being 
passed on the old homestead, which he pur- 
chased after his father's decease. He died in 
Louisiana in the seventy-fifth year of his age. 
His wife. Alma Wheeler, was a daughter of 
Nathan Wheeler, an early settler of Winsted, 
Conn., who was accidentally killed there when 
but forty-two years old. Four sons were born 
of their union, but the Rev. John P. Hawley is 
now the sole survivor. His mother died in 
Norfolk in 1858, at sixty years of age. 

John P. Hawley acquired his early education 
in the schools of Norfolk, and supplemented 
it by a course in the academy at Winsted and 
other special study. After he left school he 
taught for a time in Norfolk and also in the 
district schools of New Jersey, from which 
State he went to Illinois, where he obtained a 
situation in a law office. Obliged to leave 
that position on account of trouble with his 
eyes, he returned to the East. He was next 
employed in a store in Norfolk as clerk, and 
later on became a partner of N. B. Stevens, 
and still later was in business with others, 
until he sold out his interest. He afterward 
removed to New York, and' was in business 
there until 1866, when he entered the Hart- 
ford Theological Seminary, from which he was 
graduated in the class of 1869. 

His first ministerial charge was at South 
Coventry, Conn., where he remained five years, 
going from there to Talcottville in the town 
of Vernon, Conn. After four years' efficient 
service in the latter place he was established 
for fifteen months in Chester, Conn., before 
he accepted a call to Westerly, R.I., and re- 
moved thither. He remained there four years 
and then went to Stafford Springs, Conn., from 



which place he came five years later to New 
Hartford. During the seven years that he has 
been a resident of this place he has, by his 
broad intelligence, kindly sympathy, and his 
exemplification of practical Christianity, not 
only endeared himself to the hearts of his 
parishioners, but has won the respect and con- 
fidence of the community at large. 

He was married in 1855 to Miss Imogenet 
Brown, who was born in Winsted, Conn., and 
is a daughter of the late Harris Brown, a man- 
ufacturer of hand forks. Her parents both 
lived to the age of threescore years and ten. 
She bore her husband three children, one of 
whom, John Stevens Hawley, died when an 
infant. The two living are: Mabel W. , who 
married Mr. G. L. Keeney, formerly of South 
Manchester, Conn., but now of Monson, 
Mass. ; and Alfred M. Hawley, a bank cashier, 
who married Miss Jennie Dick, has one child, 
Florence, and resides in Colorado. 

The Rev. John P. Hawley usually casts his 
vote with the Republican party. He has 
served three terms as a Representative to the 
State legislature, first in 1862, from Norfolk, 
when he was appointed a member of the Com- 
mittee on Claims; second, in 1874, from Cov- 
entry, at which time he was a member of the 
Committee on Education; and third, in 1885, 
from Stafford, when he was House chairman 
of the Committee on Humane Institutions. 
At the close of this session the Hartford 
Times, in speaking of the members, said of 
him, "Mr. Hawley, of Stafford, was, perhaps, 
the best general debater (and a level-headed 
one) on the Republican side." Mr. Hawley 
has also served as a member of the School 
Board of Coventry, Stafford Springs, and New 
Hartford; and while a resident of Norfolk he 
acted as Constable, Selectman, and Justice of 
the Peace. For many years he was a Trustee 
of Hartford Seminary, also of the Hale Fund 



3°6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in Tolland County, which position he now 
holds; and he is also a Trustee of Monson, 
Mass., Academy. He was formerly a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the Sons of Temperance, and is now affiliated 
with a Masonic Lodge at Norfolk and the 
Chapter of Royal Arch Masons at Winsted, 
Conn. He is a seventh degree member of 
the Patrons of Husbandry, and Chaplain of the 
Mountain County Pomona. 



TT^ORNELIUS COLT, a prominent citi- 
1 ji zen of Harwinton, who owns and man- 

V >i° ^ ages a farm about a mile and a half 
from the village, was born in this town, on 
the old Colt homestead, February i, 1833. 
He is the son of Wolcott and Polly (Tomp- 
kins) Colt, and belongs to a family that has 
been well and favorably known in the vicinity 
for many years, his great-grandfather, Jona- 
than Colt, who was born October 13, 1735, 
having been one of the early settlers of the 
place. 

John Colt, son of Jonathan, spent most of 
his life on the farm now occupied by his 
grandson, the subject of this sketch, dying at 
an advanced age. John's son Wolcott also 
passed his days here, living to be fifty-four 
years of age. His wife, Polly Tompkins, who 
was a native of Plymouth, Conn., survived him 
some years, attaining the age of seventy-three, 
the latter part of her life being passed in 
Birmingham, Conn. They were both members 
of the Congregational church. Mr. and Mrs. 
Wolcott Colt reared twelve children, seven of 
whom are living; namely, Charles, Cornelius, 
Charlotte, Eliza, Julia, Martha, and Ruth. 

Cornelius Colt received his education in the 
common schools of his native town. He 
spent his youth and early manhood, with the 
exception of a year, in which he worked in 



Meriden, on the home farm, acquiring a prac- 
tical knowledge of husbandry. In 1861 he 
enlisted in the Fourth Connecticut Regiment, 
which was later known as the First Heavy 
Artillery, and was in active service three 
years, participating in some of the most 
momentous battles of the Civil War. He was 
under General McClellan's command in June 
and July, 1862, when in six days the Union 
army lost over fifteen thousand men and the 
Confederate about nineteen thousand, and took 
part in the battle of Malvern Hill, which the 
Confederate General Magruder described as 
follows: "The battlefield was enveloped in 
smoke, relieved only by flashes from the con- 
tending troops. Round shot and grape crashed 
through the woods; shells of enormous size, 
which reached far beyond the headquarters of 
the commander-in-chief, burst amid the artil- 
lery in the rear. Belgian missiles and minie 
balls lent their aid to this scene of stupendous 
grandeur and sublimity." Mr. Colt was dis- 
charged at Bermuda Hundred with the rank of 
Corporal, and, returning to the old homestead, 
has resided here up to the present time. The 
farm consists of one hundred and thirty acres, 
and is well managed by Mr. Colt, who under- 
stands thoroughly the best methods of farming 
and is recognized as an authority on agricult- 
ural subjects. He has been president for 
many years of the local agricultural society. 

On October 12, 1865, Mr. Colt was mar- 
ried to Virginia E. , daughter of Peleg and 
Eliza (Buell) Wheeler, of Litchfield. Peleg 
Wheeler, who spent the greater part of his 
life in Litchfield, was a painter by occupation. 
Mrs. Colt died in September, 1894, in her 
sixty-sixth year, leaving two children, Jennie 
W. and Robert Morris. The latter is a 
painter by trade and also manages a farm. 

Mr. Colt votes the Republican ticket. He 
still keeps up the associations of army life, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3°7 



being a prominent member of Russell Post, 
Grand Army of the Republic, of Thomaston. 
He attends the Congregational church in Har- 
winton, of which his wife was a member and to 
which his children also belong, the family tak- 
ing a prominent part in parish matters. Mr. 
Colt is possessed of fine social qualities and is 
well informed on subjects of current interest. 
He is highly esteemed in Harwinton, and is a 
fine representative of that noble band, whose 
numbers are yearly lessening — the Grand 
Army of the Republic. 




"ON. REUBEN ROCKWELL, a rep- 
resentative citizen of Litchfield 
Li^ V ^ County, is one of the most extensive 
land-holders of Colebrook, where he was for 
many years Postmaster and is now Town Clerk. 
He was born within the limits of this town, 
August 24, 1 81 8, being a son of Reuben Rock- 
well, Sr., a native of East Windsor, who was 
born in East Windsor, October i, 1765, and 
the grandson of Samuel Rockwell, a native of 
the same place. The family is descended from 
substantial English stock, coming in a direct 
line from Deacon William Rockwell, the emi- 
grant progenitor. (For further ancestral his- 
tory see the Genealogy of the Rockwells.) 

In 1766, Mr. Rockwell's grandfather, Sam- 
uel Rockwell, removed to Colebrook. In this 
connection we will refer to Trumbull's His- 
tory of Connecticut, which says: "Just previ- 
ous to the coming of Sir Edmund Andros, in 
expectation that the charter would be revoked, 
the Connecticut legislature granted to the 
towns of Hartford and Windsor the towns of 
Winchester, Torrington, Barkhamsted, Cole- 
brook, New Hartford, Hartland, and Harwin- 
ton. Later these towns divided equally, and 
the towns of Barkhamsted, Colebrook, Tor- 
rington, and the west half of Harwinton was 



Windsor's share. This was afterward divided 
among the freeholders of the town, and quite 
a tract came in this way to Samuel Rockwell." 
In 1765 Grandfather Rockwell visited this 
locality and erected a frame house, into which 
he moved the following year, as above stated. 
In 1794 he made a large addition to this 
dwelling, the house which he had first built 
becoming the L. The entire house still 
stands, in excellent repair, occupied by his 
grand-daughter, Elizabeth Rockwell. 

Mr. Samuel Rockwell lived in his native 
town a while after his marriage with Hephzi- 
bah Pratt ; and when the removal to Colebrook 
was made she accompanied him to their future 
home on horseback, with her infant son in her 
arms. He came with an ox team and sled 
with their household goods, they being the 
third family to locate in the town, which was 
then a wilderness, where deer were occasion- 
ally seen and wild turkeys were quite plenti- 
ful. Toiling day after day with the coura- 
geous energy and the indomitable perseverance 
that characterized the early pioneer, he cleared 
a large farm, on which he resided until his 
death in 1795. He reared six sons, namely: 
Samuel, Jr.; Timothy; Solomon; Reuben, 
Sr. ; Alpha; and Martin. Samuel, Jr., be- 
came a physician, practising first in Salisbury 
and later in Sharon, where he spent his last 
years. The other five sons became associated 
in business with their father, under the firm 
name of Samuel Rockwell & Sons, and in 
addition to farming erected and operated a 
saw-mill. 

After the death of the father the brothers 
continued business under the name of Solomon 
Rockwell & Brothers, enlarging their opera- 
tions by the erection of a flour-mill, a wool- 
len-mill, and an iron forge, and engaging in 
the manufacture of woollen goods and of iron 
and steel. In 18 10 the brothers divided the 



3o8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



real estate ; and a few years later complications 
arose, owing to the fact that much of the land 
was overflowed, heavy law-suits being the 
result. Shortly after the War of 1812 they 
closed out the manufacturing business here, 
and Solomon went to Winsted, where he 
erected an iron forge, which was one of the 
first established industries in that now busy 
borough. He engaged in the manufacture of 
scythes, continuing thus employed until his 
decease. Timothy, the second son, passed 
away from earth a few weeks before his father. 
Alpha removed to Winsted, and erected a resi- 
dence on the site of the present Beardsley 
House, there spending his last years. Martin 
was a lifelong resident of Colebrook. Reuben 
Rockwell, Sn, who was engaged with his 
brother in farming pursuits for a number of 
years and afterward carried on the same occu- 
pation by himself, died June 14, 1840. 

He married Rebecca Bebee, a native of 
Litchfield, Conn., a daughter of Bezaleel 
Bebee, a veteran of the Revolution. Mr. 
Bebee enlisted as a private in the Fourth Com- 
pany, First Regiment, at the time of the siege 
of Boston. He was shortly commissioned 
First Lieutenant, and for gallant services and 
meritorious conduct was successively promoted 
till before the close of the war he held the 
rank of Colonel of the regiment. Five chil- 
dren were born of the union of Mr. Reuben, 
Sr., and Rebecca Rockwell; namely, Julius, 
Louisa, Bezaleel B., Elizabeth, and Reuben. 
The mother outlived her husband several 
years, dying in 1851. 

Reuben Rockwell was the youngest child 
born to the parental household. On reaching 
manhood he was engaged in mercantile busi- 
ness for about ten years, but has been more 
especially interested in agricultural pursuits, 
being a large holder of real estate. In 1858 
Mr. Rockwell married Miss Aurelia Eno, who 



was born in Colebrook, a woman of rare per- 
sonal qualities. Characterized by the same 
mental vigor, business aptitude, and high 
moral rectitude that distinguished his ances- 
tors, Mr. Rockwell holds a prominent position 
among the leading citizens of Colebrook, and 
has served in the various offices of trust with 
marked fidelity. He was elected to the office 
of Town Clerk in 1853, and served continu- 
ously until 1877, and in 1888 was again 
elected to that ofifice, which he still holds. 
From 1 841 until 1857 he served as Postmaster 
of the town, being again appointed in 1861, 
when he resigned to accept the ofifice of Asses- 
sor of Internal Revenue, to which he was 
appointed immediately after. He continued 
Assessor for the Fourth Congressional District 
until the ofifice was abolished, when he again 
became Postmaster, remaining in the office 
until 1893. Mr. Rockwell has also served in 
the State legislature, having been a representa- 
tive in 1857 and a member of the Senate the 
following year. He cast his first Presidential 
vote for General Harrison in 1840, and has 
voted at every town. State, and national elec- 
tion since that time. On the formation of the ' 
Republican party he joined its ranks, and has 
since been faithful to its interests. 




HERMAN BENEDICT, a prosper- 
ous Litchfield County farmer, owns 
and occupies the ancestral farm in 
the town of Kent on which he was born, Au- 
gust 7, 1818. His parents were William and 
Plannah (Hitchcock) Benedict. The father of 
William was Elijah Benedict, who resided for 
a greater part of his life in the south part of 
Kent, where he followed the trade of a shoe- 
maker in connection with farming. Pie lived 
to about the age of eighty years, as did also 
his wife, Molly Benedict. Their children 




SHERMAN BENEDICT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3'i 



were: William; Nathan; Sylvia, who became 
Mrs. William Turrill ; and David. 

William Benedict was born in the south part 
of Kent, and was a lifelong resident of this 
town. He conducted the home farm with 
profitable results, and was known as an intelli- 
gent and useful citizen. He and his family 
attended the Methodist church. In politics he 
was a Democrat, and took a prominent part in 
public affairs, serving in various important 
town offices with marked ability. His first 
wife, Hannah Hitchcock, of Washington, 
Conn., became the mother of three children, as 
follows: Harriet, who became the wife of 
Ralph Howland, and reared one son, Sherman 
Howland, who is married and has six children 
— namely, Evelyn, Sherman, Mary, Justina, 
Mark, and Flora; Sherman, the subject of this 
sketch ; and Barbara, who became the wife of 
Edwin R. Roberts. The first wife died aged 
thirty-one, and William Benedict's second 
wife, Amanda Hallock, daughter of William 
Hallock, of New Milford, died at the age of 
sixty-four, leaving two children, namely : Eliza, 
who became the wife of George L. Page; and 
Sylvia (deceased), wife of Edwin Barnum. 

Sherman Benedict acquired his education in 
the common and select, schools of his native 
town, and subsequently pursued a course of 
study at the academy in Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
At the age of seventeen he took charge of the 
home farm, and has since followed agricultural 
pursuits with an energy and perseverance 
which have resulted in an ample reward for his 
labors. He is a Democrat in politics, has 
served the town with fidelity and good judgment 
as a member of the Board of Selectmen and a 
Justice of the Peace; and in 1880 he was 
elected a Representative to the State legis- 
lature, in which capacity he displayed a zeal- 
ous desire for the maintainance of good 
government. 



Mr. Benedict was united in marriage with 
Laura Noble, daughter of Jonathan Noble, of 
Kent, in 1840, and has had three children: 
Andrew H., Ellen, and Vesta. Andrew H. 
Benedict has been twice married. By his first 
wife. Flora Piatt, he has a son Otis and a 
daughter Edith. His second wife, formerly 
Julia Jones, has had but one child, a son, 
Sherman J., who died aged twenty-three years. 
Otis Benedict married Eliza Austin, and has 
two daughters. Flora and Charlotte. Ellen is 
the wife of Samuel R. Hill, and has two chil- 
dren, Randolph and Laura. Vesta, the wife 
of William B. Burnett, has one daughter, 
named Cora. Mr. and Mrs. Benedict attend 
the Methodist Episcopal church, of which both 
are members. 

Speaking of the Benedicts of Connecticut, 
Hinman says, "This was early a highly re- 
spected family of the colony. " We are happy 
here to present in connection with the life 
sketch of Mr. Sherman Benedict a portrait of 
this worthy scion of ancient stock. 




"ON. FREDERICK A. JEWELL, a 
well-known lawyer and a prominent 
resident of New Hartford, Conn., 
ex-Judge of Probate of Litchfield County, was 
born in Salisbury, Conn., September 14, 1858, 
son of Oliver and Mary E. (Walton) Jewell. 
The Jewell family is of English origin, and 
some of its ancestors emigrated to the New 
England colony early in the seventeenth cen- 
tury. Mr. Jewell's great-grandfather resided 
in Salisbury, and the farm upon which he 
lived has been in the possession of the family 
since the year 1745. His son, Andrew Jew- 
ell, was born upon the farm in Salisbury, and 
there successfully followed agriculture, living 
to be seventy years old. He raised a family 
of eight children. 



312 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Oliver Jewell, son of Andrew, was reared to 
farm life and labor, and succeeded to the pos- 
session of the homestead. He was thrifty and 
energetic and became a prosperous farmer. 
He died in Salisbury, aged seventy-one. Oli- 
ver Jewell was a member of the Congregational 
church, with which he long held official rela- 
tions, being Deacon for more than forty years 
and for many years superintendent of the Sun- 
day-school. He was highly esteemed for his 
Christian character and principles. His wife, 
Mary E. Walton, was a daughter of Dr. Ward 
Walton, of Salisbury, where she was born. 
Her great-grandfather was the first Congrega- 
tional minister to settle in Salisbury; and she 
is a lineal descendant, in the seventh genera- 
tion, of Governor Bradford of the Plymouth 
Colony. Dr. Ward Walton spent his last 
years in New York State. The children 
of Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Jewell were: Eliza 
Everest, who married Moses L. Graham, of 
Salisbury; Moore C, a merchant of Salis- 
bury, who died at the age of twenty-nine; and 
Frederick A., the subject of this sketch. 
Mrs. Mary E. Jewell, who still survives, re- 
sides with her daughter in Salisbury. 

Frederick A. Jewell acquired his elementary 
education in the common-schools of his na- 
tive town. He assisted his father upon the 
farm and also was employed in his brother's 
store until reaching the age of seventeen, at 
which time he began to prepare for college 
under the instruction of a private tutor. He 
later abandoned the intention of pursuing a 
collegiate course and entered upon the study of 
law instead. He completed a thorough course 
of legal study and was admitted to the bar on 
December 7, 1881. He began the practice of 
his profession in New Hartford, where he has 
since continued to reside, and has a large and 
profitable general law business. He has been 
a Justice of the Peace for thirteen years, and 



was Judge of Probate for eight years, having 
been at the date of his appointment the young- 
est man who had held that office. He has also 
been Commissioner of the Superior Court. 
Mr. Jewell is a Republican in politics, is Past 
Master of Lodge No. 121, A. F. & A. M., of 
New Hartford, and is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias, in some of whose offices he has 
served. He is well-known as a gentleman 
possessing many estimable traits of character. 
In 1886 Mr. Jewell married Amy S. Sey- 
mour, who was born in New Hartford, daugh- 
ter of Carlton Seymour, a merchant of that 
town. Carlton Seymour was formerly an 
officer in the United States Army. He retired 
from service, becoming a contractor, and finally 
settled in New Hartford, where he engaged in 
mercantile pursuits. Mrs. Amy S. Seymour 
Jewell was a lady possessing superior intellect- 
ual powers. She became a proficient law stu- 
dent, and was the first lady to be appointed 
Commissioner of Courts in the State of Con- 
necticut. Formerly an Episcopalian, she later 
united with the Congregational church. She 
died at the age of twenty-four, leaving one 
child, named Oliver Seymour. Mr. Jewell 
married for his second wife Mrs. Ada S. 
Gates, nee Smith, widow of Walter B. Gates, 
and daughter of Rufus Smith, of Massachu- 
setts. Mr. Jewell is a member of the Congre- 
gational church, of which he was organist for 
ten years. 

|^ENJAMIN F. PAGE, a well-known 
^^ farmer of Harwinton, Conn., and a 
veteran of the Civil War, was born 
in Warren, another Litchfield County town, on 
October 24, 1837, son of Daniel and Ursula 
(Smith) Page. Mr. Page's grandfather, Dan- 
iel Page, Sr., a native of Branford, New 
Haven County, moved from that town to War- 
ren, where he purchased a farm, upon which 




BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3^3 



he resided for the remainder of his life. He 
reared a large family of children. 

His son and namesake, Daniel Page, was 
born in Warren and was brought up on the 
home farm. He left the paternal roof at the 
age of twenty-one, but eventually returned and 
took charge of the farm during the declining 
years of his parents. He succeeded to the 
ownership of the homestead, and followed farm- 
ing successfully for many years. After retiring 
from active labor he resided with a daughter in 
Goshen, where he died in 1881, at the age of 
eighty-eight years. His wife, Ursula Smith, 
was born in Litchfield, Conn. Of their eight 
children five are still living, namely: Lydia 
A., wife of J. B. Corbin ; Samuel D. ; Mary, 
wife of George Crandall ; Julia, wife of Henry 
L. Coe; and Benjamin F., the subject of this 
sketch. The deceased are: Caroline, the wife 
of Erastus Bates ; Sarah, who was unmarried ; 
and George W., who married M. J. Smith, of 
Waterbury, Conn. The mother died at the 
old homestead in Warren in 1861, aged sixty- 
six years. 

Benjamin F. Page was educated in the com- 
mon schools of his native town and resided with 
his parents until reaching the age of eighteen, 
when he began life for himself. He was for 
a time employed as a farmer and later as a 
teamster, working in various towns until 1861. 
Enlisting in that year as a private in Company 
E, Eighth Regiment, Connecticut Volunteer 
Infantry, he served four years in the Civil 
War, participating in several hotly contested 
battles, including the engagement at Cold 
Harbor and the siege of Petersburg. At 
Fort Harrison by the explosion of a shell he 
received a wound which confined him to the 
hospital for several months. During his ser- 
vice he was promoted to the rank of Corporal 
and later to that of Sergeant, and was dis- 
charged as such at the close of the war. After 



leaving the service he returned to Warren, and 
a short time later he purchased a farm in East 
Granville, Mass., where he made his home for 
six years. In 1872 he sold his property in East 
Granville and bought his present farm in Har- 
winton, consisting of seventy-five acres of well- 
improved land, which he devotes to general 
farming and dairying. By his untiring energy 
and good judgment in the management of his 
affairs he has reached a position of prosperity. 

In 1865 Mr. Page was married to Frances 
M. Smith. She was born in Cornwall, only 
daughter of Eli B. and Emeline (Corbin) 
Smith, late of Harwinton. Her father was a 
wagon-inaker by trade, and followed that occu- 
pation in Cornwall and later in New Britain. 
He finally settled in Harwinton, where he 
died in 1871, at the age of fifty-five years. 
He was a man of intelligence, a Republican in 
politics, and earlier in life favored the antislav- 
ery, or Free Soil, party, then so called. Mr. 
and Mrs. Page have two children, namely: 
Alena E. , who was educated in the public 
schools of Harwinton and the High School of 
Plainville, Conn., and has taught school for 
several years; and Charles A., who has re- 
ceived a common-school and academic educa- 
tion. The family attend the Congregational 
church, of which Mrs. Page and daughter are 
members; and they are actively interested in 
church work. 

Mr. Page is a Republican in politics; and 
during his residence in East Granville, Mass., 
he was Tax Collector for one year. He has 
served as Constable for many years in Harwin- 
ton, and at present is a Justice of the Peace. 
He was a member of the House of Represent- 
atives of the State legislature in 1895. He 
has been a member of St. Paul's Lodge, A. F. 
& A. M., of Litchfield. He is a comrade of 
Steele Post, Grand Army of the Republic, of 
Torrington. 



ii4 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



-fpTUDSON M. SEYMOUR, a success- 
r^H fill dairyman of New Hartford, was 

J-^'' V.^ born August 6, 1842, upon the 

farm where he now resides, son of Sedgwick 
and Mary A. (Case) Seymour. Mr. Seymour 
is a descendant of John Seymour, who came to 
New Hartford at an early date and settled 
upon a large tract of land situated on West 
Hill, where he passed the remainder of his 
life. His son Uriah was born in New Hart- 
ford and resided upon this estate. He served 
as Major in the American army during the 
Revolutionary War. Mr. Seymour has in his 
possession two deeds which were executed in 
the name of Uriah Seymour, one in 1757 and 
the other in 1758. Chauncey Seymour, son of 
Uriah, was "born in New Hartford, December 
14, 1762, and inherited the estate that is now 
owned and occupied by his grandson, the sub- 
ject of the present sketch. Chauncey Sey- 
mour followed farming with ability and good 
success, erecting the present residence in or 
near the year 1800, and otherwise improving 
the property. He was a prominent man in the 
place, serving as a Justice of the Peace for 
many years, being also active in church affairs; 
and he was a Representative in the State leg- 
islature several terms. He died July 12, 
1839, aged seventy-seven years. Mr. Chaun- 
cey Seymour was twice married, and reared a 
family of eleven children, of whom Sedg- 
wick, Hudson M. Seymour's father, was the 
youngest. 

Sedgwick Seymour was born at the old 
homestead, September 20, 1808. He was 
reared to an agricultural life, and after the 
death of his father he succeeded to the own- 
ership of the estate. He conducted general 
farming successfully until his death, which 
occurred November 30, 1859. He was com- 
missioned Captain of an artillery company in 
the State militia and served several years. 



He also held other positions of trust and confi- 
dence in the administration of public affairs. 
His wife, Mary A. Case, whom he married 
September 6, 1831, was born in Canton, No- 
vember 27, 1 81 2, daughter of Dudley and 
Lina (Barbour) Case. Dudley Case, who was 
the father of a large family, moved from Can- 
ton to Barkhamsted, and later went to Texas, 
where he passed the remainder of his life with 
his sons. Mr. and Mrs. Sedgwick Seymour 
were the parents of five children, four of whom 
reached maturity, and two are now living; 
namely, Mary and Hudson M. Mary is now 
the widow of H. H. Stone, who was formerly 
a prominent resident of New Hartford, and 
served as a Selectman, Sheriff, and Represent- 
ative to the legislature. The mother passed 
her declining years with her children, and 
died February 4, 1895, aged eighty-two 
years. Both parents were formerly Congre- 
gationalists. 

Hudson M. Seymour commenced at an early 
age to assist in conducting the farm. His 
elementary education was obtained in the dis- 
trict schools of his native town. After the 
death of his father, which occurred when 
young Seymour was in his eighteenth year, he 
worked out by the month, and thus obtained 
means to pursue more advanced studies at the 
Connecticut Literary Institute three terms, 
and to take a course at Eastman's Business 
College in Poughkeepsie, N. Y. He then re- 
turned to the old homestead, which he hired 
till February 4, 1895, and has since been 
engaged in agricultural labors. His farm, 
which consists of one hundred and fifty acres, 
IS devoted principally to dairying interests. 
He keeps an average of twenty cows, and for 
the past twenty years has furnished some of 
the local dealers in the village of New Hart- 
ford with milk. He is a Republican in poli- 
tics, and represented his town in the legis- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



315 



latiire in 1895. In the Masonic fraternity he is 
a member of Amos Beecher Lodge, A. F. & 
A. M., of New Hartford; the Chapter and 
Council of Winsted ; and Washington Com- 
mandery, No. i, of Hartford. 

In July, 187S, Mr. Seymour married Anna 
Dew, a daughter of George Dew. Her father, 
who is a native of England, came to America 
and settled in Litchfield County, where he 
engaged in farming, but is now residing in 
Maryland. Mr. and Mrs. Seymour have two 
children, Martha and Julius. Mr. Seymour 
is a member of the Episcopal church in Pine 
Meadow, of which he is a Vestryman, and 
takes a profound interest in all its affairs. 
He is a thrifty and energetic farmer, an intel- 
ligent and useful citizen, and a worthy repre- 
sentative of an old and highly reputable 

family. 

< •■» » 

/^^TeORGE B. ALFRED, a farmer of 
V i) I Harwinton, in the eastern part of 
Litchfield County, was born in this 
town, March 27, 1823. His parents were Ju- 
lius and Candace (Thrall) Alfred. Mr. Al- 
fred's great-grandfather. Job Alfred, who was 
a soldier of the Revolutionary War, became an 
early settler in Harwinton, and was here en- 
gaged in agricultural labors until his death. 
His son, Job Alfred, Jr., Mr. Alfred's grand- 
father, was born in Harwinton and learned the 
trade of a cooper, an occupation which he fol- 
lowed in connection with farming. He passed 
his entire life in Harwinton, and died at the 
age of seventy-three years. 

Julius Alfred, son of the younger Job, was 
also a native of Harwinton. He learned the 
trade of carpenter and joiner, and was engaged 
as a master builder in Harwinton and the sur- 
rounding towns. He followed his vocation 
with prosperous results, becoming a well- 
. known and reliable workman, and a highly es- 



teemed citizen. Julius Alfred died at the age 
of fifty-five years. His wife, Candace Thrall, 
was a daughter of Eli Thrall, a pipe layer, who 
resided in Harwinton. She was born in Ege- 
mont, N.Y. , and came to Harwinton with her 
parents when young. Mr. and Mrs. Julius 
Alfred reared but one son, George B., the sub- 
ject of this sketch. The mother died at his 
home in Harwinton at the age of seventy-five. 
Mrs. Candace T. Alfred was a member of the 
Congregational church. 

George B. Alfred was educated in the public 
schools of his native town, and at an early age 
adopted agriculture as an occupation. He also 
engaged in lumbering to some extent, and 
after the death of his father he succeeded to 
the ownership of the homestead. In 1867 he 
purchased his present farm, which consists of 
one hundred and fifteen acres; and this, to- 
gether with other tracts of land, gives him a 
total of four hundred acres. He has in the 
past devoted considerable attention to dairy- 
ing, but at the present time is engaged princi- 
pally in general farming, still keeping about 
twenty-five cows, mostly Jerseys and Hol- 
steins. Mr. Alfred is a Republican in poli- 
tics, and has been prominent in public affairs. 
He was a member of the Board of Selectmen, 
and in 1876 represented his town with marked 
ability in the legislature. 

In 1852 Mr. Alfred married Mary A. Bots- 
ford, daughter of Cyrus and Jeannette (Beebe) 
Botsford. Mrs. Alfred's great-grandfather 
was an early settler in Derby, Conn., where 
her grandfather, Ezra Botsford, was a farmer 
and a lifelong resident. Cyrus Botsford was 
born in Derby and learned the trade of a stone 
mason, which he followed during the active 
portion of his life. His declining years were 
passed with his daughter in Harwinton, where 
he died at the age of eighty-one. He was a 
member of the Episcopal church. His wife, 



?i6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Jeannette Beebe, a daughter of Martin Beebe, 
died in Oxford at the early age of thirty-six 
years. They were the parents of nine chil- 
dren, two of whom are still living, namely: 
Elizabeth, who married William Thayer; and 
Mary A. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred have had seven chil- 
dren, six of whom are still living, namely: 
Warren J., who married Emma Lloyd, and is 
a hotel-keeper in the Adirondack region in 
New York State; Edwin B., who married 
Linda Perry, and has two children — Wini- 
fred J. and Edna M. ; Robert A., who married 
Agnes Maynard, and has one child, named 
Mabel Bernice; Julius B. , a policeman in 
Providence, who married Nellie Brown, and 
has two children, named Grace A. and Hazel 
J. ; Jessie, wife of Fred K. Perry, a job 
printer in Naugatuck, having one child, 
Harold R. ; and Marion B., who is still at 
home. Mr. Alfred's sons, who have been 
liberally educated, are now well advanced in 
business prosperity. Edwin B. is in the phos- 
phate business in Florida, and Robert A. is 
engaged in the setting up and adjusting of 
machinery for phosphate works. Mr. and 
Mrs. George B. Alfred are among the most 
highly esteemed and respected residents of 
Harwinton. Mrs. Alfred is a member of the 
Congregational church. 




"ON. DANIEL CURTISS, formerly 
member of the Connecticut Senate, 
who was for many years closely 
identified with the industrial growth and 
development of Woodbury, was born in that 
town, September i8, 1801, son of David S. and 
Sybil (Huntington) Curtiss. Mr. Curtiss, 
who was of English origin, traced his descent 
through eight generations to William Curtiss, 
who emigrated from England and settled in 



Stratford, Conn., at an early date in the col- 
ony's history. The family was continued by 
John, son of William, Israel, and Ensign John 
Curtiss to David, who was Mr. Curtiss's great- 
grandfather. His grandparents were David 
(second) and Sarah (Miner) Curtiss. His 
parents were residents of Woodbury. 

Daniel Curtiss received a good education in 
the schools of Woodbury. After completing 
his studies he was engaged in teaching school 
for several terms. When a young man he 
bought a farm in Woodbury, which he carried 
on for a few years. He then went to the State 
of New Jersey, where he engaged in peddling 
for a short time. Finding this employment 
not to his liking, he returned to his native town 
and established himself in mercantile busi- 
ness at the south end of Main Street. He 
later purchased the house and store of Jabez 
Bacon, located. near the village, and there suc- 
cessfully conducted a large general business 
for a number of years. The house, which was 
built in 1760, is still standing, and in its 
present improved condition is one of the sub- 
stantial homesteads of the town. While en- 
gaged in conducting a profitable business Mr. 
Curtiss kept a lookout for some good invest- 
ment for his surplus capital. This he found 
in the manufacture of silverware, which proved 
a most successful venture. He was the first 
to introduce German silver spoons, thimbles, 
etc., and employed a force of seventy-five 
skilled workmen in that industry. The fac- 
tory, which was located opposite to his store, 
was subsequently destroyed by fire; but the 
business was continued in quarters located 
upon the other side of the river. He after- 
ward retired from the enterprise, and, purchas- 
ing the old woollen factory built by Jesse 
Burton, he renovated and otherwise improved 
It, and revived its former business with vigor. 
His three sons eventually became partners 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



317 



with him ; but he continued at the head of the 
concern until his death, which took place 
March 16, 1878. He was a member of the 
Congregational society. In politics he was a 
Whig, and joined the Republican party at its 
formation, supporting its principles with zeal. 
His well-known ability made him of especial 
value to the community in public affairs, and 
he rendered distinguished services in both the 
House of Representatives and the Senate. 
He was deeply interested in the welfare of his 
native town, whose industrial resources he was 
so largely instrumental in developing. His 
knowledge in relation to financial affairs was 
always in demand, and he was for some time 
President of the Woodbury Bank. 

On January 27, 1835, Mr. Curtiss was 
united in marriage to Julia F. Strong, daugh- 
ter of John, Jr., and Flora (Preston) Strong. 
Mrs. Curtiss' s grandparents were Lieutenant 
John and Sarah (Walker) Strong, the former 
of whom was a prosperous farmer of his day 
and an ofificer in the Revolutionary War. 
John Strong, Jr., was a graduate of Yale Col- 
lege in the class of 1806, and, locating in 
Woodbury, became one of the leading lawyers 
of Litchfield County. He was a Representa- 
tive to the legislature in 1813, 1825, and 
1826, and was Judge of Probate for the years 
1 816, 1 81 7, and 1834. He died at the age of 
forty-eight, and his wife lived to reach the 
advanced age of ninety years. Their children 
were: Julia F., Charles, Horace, John W., 
Emily, and William. William, Horace, and 
John are now deceased. Mrs. Curtiss has had 
eight children, as follows: Walter, born April 
18, 1836; Emily A., born October 30, 1837, 
and married to Homer Tomlinson; Ellen C, 
born November 8, 1839, and married to Perry 
Averill; Horace D., born July 24, 1841 ; 
Cordelia, born March 13, 1843, who married 
G. C. White and is now deceased; Edward, 



born January 24, 1845; Frances J., born July 
7, 1848, now residing with her mother; and 
Elizabeth S., born September 7, 1850, who 
married E. F. Cole, and died January 11, 1883. 
Mrs. Curtiss still resides at the old homestead. 
Horace D. Curtiss, a partner in the woollen 
manufacturing business founded by his father, 
is one of Woodbury's most enterprising and 
successful business men of to-day. He be- 
came identified with the business at an early 
age. In 1861 the plant was enlarged by erect- 
ing a three-story brick building, and a spe- 
cialty has been made of gentlemen's wool- 
len goods of a superior quality. Horace Cur- 
tiss bought the Daniel Martin homestead, 
which he converted into a beautiful as well as 
a comfortable residence. He has invested in 
some very valuable property in Woodbury. 
He formerly owned the Glepe place. He pur- 
chased the Judge N. B. Smith place on Main 
Street, where he now resides, and upon which 
he has erected a new and handsome residence 
with other buildings. He has also been an ex- 
tensive dealer in cattle. He was married on 
October 6, 1868, to Harriet F. Atwater, a 
daughter of Ira Atwater, of New Haven, and 
has two children, namely: Charles, a chemist, 
born May 24, 1875, and a graduate of Yale; 
and Olivia H., born March 30, 1878. Mr. 
Horace Curtiss is a Republican in politics. 
He has served as a Selectman and in other 
town offices. He represented the town in the 
legislature in 1868 and 1884, and was a mem- 
ber of the State Senate for the years 1885 and 
1886. He is a member of the Congregational 

society. 

— < *•» > 

-OHN H. VAN KEUREN, of Winsted, 
Conn., editor of the Winsted Evening 
Citizen, was born in Kingston, N.Y. , 
November 20, 1843. His first paternal an- 
cestor of whom we find record in this country 




3i8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was an immigrant from Holland, who settled 
in New York State in 1636. Mr. Van Keu- 
ren's grandmother was a child of nine years 
when the British captured and burned Kings- 
ton ; and when the women and children fled 
for their lives she was swept with the tide of 
refugees to the town of Hurley, adjacent to 
Kingston. 

Mr. Van Keuren's mother, whose maiden 
name was Ruima Hamilton, is a descendant of 
one of the old families of New York who set- 
tled in that State prior to 1700. She was 
born in 1810, and is still living, a widow, in 
Kingston. She has been a faithful member of 
the Dutch Reformed church for seventy years. 
Through her Mr. Van Keuren claims relation- 
ship to Alexander Hamilton. 

John H. Van Keuren was educated at the 
public schools and at Kingston Academy. He 
filled the editorial chair of the Kingston Press, 
and conducted the paper when the Hon. D. C. 
McMillan was owner. Later Mr. Van Keuren 
was editor of the Kingston Daily Neivs and 
the Wethersfield Farmer, and for the past 
seven years has been editor of the Winsted 
Evening Citizen. He has been for many years 
a contributor to the metropolitan press and to 
other publications. 

Mr. Van Keuren was married in Kingston 
in February, i868, to Sarah Elliott. The two 
daughters born of this union, Grace and Amy 
Van Keuren, are teachers in Winsted, and 
reside with their parents. Mr. Van Keuren 
is. a stanch Republican, devoted to the inter- 
ests of his party, and, while a church attendant 
at public worship, is not a member of any 
church. 




HXIAM J. PLATT, a descendant 
of one of the oldest families in 
Bridgewater, Conn., and a success- 
ful farmer, who died at the Piatt homestead, 



February 18, 1887, was born here on Decem- 
ber 12, 1809. He was a son of Jeremiah and 
Irene (Barrett) Piatt, and a great-grandson of 
Jeremiah and Hannah Piatt, of Milford, whose 
son, Jeremiah, the next in line, was born on 
December 12, 1747. 

Grandfather Piatt settled in that part of 
New Milford which later became the town of 
Bridgewater, where he cleared and improved a 
large farm, and built in 1798 the substantial 
residence which is now occupied by his grand- 
son's widow and is still in a good state of 
preservation. The materials for its construc- 
tion were obtained upon the farm, and it con- 
tains large open fireplaces, brick ovens, and 
other reminders of a century past. It was a 
favorite resting-place for travellers, who came 
in numbers at the time of the spring training 
of the State militia, and were sure of comfort- 
able quarters and pleasant entertainment. 
Jeremiah Piatt, second, was a prominent man 
in Bridgewater until his death in 1805. He 
was an early member of St. Peter's Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M. He married Mary Merwin, 
who was born December 18, 1753; and they 
reared three children: Jeremiah, Hannah, 
and Newton. Mrs. Mary M. Piatt died in 
1825. 

Jeremiah Piatt, third, was born October 20, 
1772. He inherited the homestead, conducted 
general farming and dairying, and kept a 
hotel. He was an able and industrious 
farmer, well and favorably known; and he con- 
tinued active until his death, which took place 
in 1839. His wife, formerly Irene Barrett, 
became the mother of three children, as fol- 
lows : Caroline, who was born February 6, 
1800; William J., the subject of this sketch; 
and Oliver, who was born January 29, 181 2. 
Mrs. Irene B. Piatt died in 1863, aged eighty- 
one years. 

William J. Piatt was reared to farm work, 




WILLIAM J. PLATT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3ii 



and eventually succeeded to the ownership of 
the homestead. He conducted farming accord- 
ing to the progressive principles which were 
inaugurated by his ancestors, of whose record 
he was justly proud ; and he sought by every 
possible improvement he could make upon the 
land and buildings to sustain their reputation 
as thrifty, industrious, and model farmers, 
thus becoming one of the leading agricultu- 
rists of his day. He was a man of sound 
judgment and high moral character, and he 
ably fulfilled his duties as an intelligent and 
useful citizen. He died at the Piatt residence 
in Bridgewater, aged seventy-eight years. 
His first wife, whose maiden name was Eliza 
M. Peck, died in middle life; and on October 
21, 1875, he wedded for his second wife Mrs. 
Ann (Arthur) Thompson, widow of Smith E. 
Thompson. 

Mrs. Piatt was born in Monmouthshire, 
Wales, daughter of William and Elizabeth 
(Harper) Arthur, who were natives of Wales 
and most estimable people. Her father, a 
blacksmith and wheelwright by trade, died at 
the age of sixty years, and her mother at forty- 
seven. Their children were: Thomas; Will- 
iam ; and Ann, who is now Mrs. Piatt. Ann 
Arthur came to the United States on board a 
sailing-vessel that was commanded by her 
uncle, and, being favorably impressed with 
New York City, she settled there and engaged 
in dress-making. Her first husband. Smith 
E. Thompson, died at the age of fifty-seven 
years. Since becoming the wife of Mr. Piatt 
she has resided in Bridgewater, where she still 
occupies the old Piatt mansion ; and, although 
she rents the land, she maintains personal 
supervision of the estate, in order that she may 
follow out her husband's idea of keeping the 
property up to its high standard of excellence. 
She is a lady of unusual physical and mental 
vigor, and is held in the highest esteem by 



her many friends and acquaintances. She 
attends the Episcopal church. 

A portrait of Mr. Piatt accompanies this 
brief memoir. 



m 



ORTLAND D. COLE, a prosperous 
farmer and successful business man of 
Washington, was born in New Mil- 
ford, Conn., August 2, 1846, son of Sumner 
Benjamin and Eliza (Hallock) Cole. Mr. 
Cole's father, who was a native of Scotland, 
came to the United States when a child, and 
passed most of his boyhood years in New 
York. In early manhood he became inter- 
ested in railroad construction, and was en- 
gaged as contractor on the Housatonic and 
Naugatuck Railways. He led a busy and suc- 
cessful life, and died at the age of forty-five 
years. His wife, Eliza Hallock, was a daugh- 
ter of William Hallock, of Kent. She reared 
four children, namely: Prudence, who is now 
Mrs. Edwards, and has three children ; Cort- 
land D. ; Cassius; and Ida, who is now Mrs. 
Hoag, and has three children. Mrs. Sumner 
B. Cole still survives at the age of seventy- 
two years. 

Cortland D. Cole received a good education, 
and at an early age developed a taste and 
capacity for business pursuits which have en- 
abled him to conduct successfully various im- 
portant ventures. He resided for eight years 
in Roxbury. In 1874 he came to Washington 
and settled upon his present farm, which is 
pleasantly situated and consists of seventy 
acres of well-improved land. Besides carrying 
on general farming he has dealt extensively in 
cattle. He also has business interests of an 
important nature in Bridgeport and Torring- 
ton. Conn., in Florida, in Union City, and in 
San Diego, Cal. He is a Democrat in poli- 
tics, and served as Selectman for two years, 
having also acted as Assessor and Registrar. 



322 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



In 1875 Mr. Cole was united in marriage to 
Adelaide G. Frisbie, daughter of Daniel Fris- 
bie, of Washington. They have had two chil- 
dren, namely: Abbie B. ; and Daniel E. , who 
is no longer living. Mr. Cole attends the 
Congregational church, and is a member of 
Rising Sun Lodge, No. 27, A. F. & A. M. 



'AMES JACKSON PRESTON, a vet- 
eran agriculturist of Litchfield County 
and an honored and respected resident 
of the town of Winchester, was born May 5, 
1 81 7, in Harwinton, the place of nativity of 
his father, John S. Preston. For many years 
the home of his early ancestors was in Massa- 
chusetts, and the record of their lives forms a 
part of the early history of that Common- 
wealth. 

Roger Preston, born in England in 1614, 
sailed from London in 1635; and upon his 
arrival on the New England shores he settled 
in Ipswich, Mass., where he resided for 
twenty-two years. Removing then to Salem, 
a few miles south, he lived there until his 
death, nine years later, on January 20, 1666. 
Martha Preston, his wife, whose maiden name 
is not recorded, was born in 1623, and died on 
March 21, 1703. Several sons were born of 
their union, of whom Samuel, the next in 
order of lineal descent, was born in Ipswich in 
1651, and died in Andover, July 10, 1738. 
He married in Andover, May 27, 1671, Miss 
Susannah Gutterson, who died December 29, 
1710. Three years later, September 24, 1713, 
he formed a second union with Mrs. Mary 
Blodget. He was the father of eleven chil- 
dren, two of whom, John and Jacob, removed 
to Connecticut. 

John Preston was born in Andover, May i, 
1685. In his Connecticut home he followed 
the occupation of a hewer of timber and a 



tiller of the soil, and spent his last years on 
his farm in the town of Windham, Windham 
County, where he died July 26, 1733. On 
January 10, 1707, he married Miss Mary 
Haynes, of Haverhill, Mass., where she was 
born March 3, 1687, daughter of Jonathan 
and Sarah (Moulton) Haynes. Mary Haynes 
and her brothers were captured by Indians and 
taken to Canada, where the brothers remained, 
but she was ransomed by a hand-sled load of 
tobacco and was drawn home on the sled. In 
1709 John Preston received a grant of land in 
Killingly; and from the recorded dates of the 
births of their children it is evident that he 
and his wife removed to Windham between 
1725 and 1727, as their tenth child, born 
October 10, 1725, was baptized in Killingly, 
and the eleventh child was born in Windham, 
August 20, 1727. John Preston, the second, 
their eldest, whose birth occurred in Andover 
or Killingly in 1708, married March 18, 
1 73 1, Miss Eleanor Stiles, who was born in 
Boxford, Mass., February 17, 1703, daughter 
of John and Deliverance (Town) Stiles. 
They became the parents of four children, as 
follows: John, Asa, Anne, and Jonathan. 

John Preston, the third, the paternal grand- 
father of the subject of this sketch, was born 
in Windham in 1735. After attaining man's 
estate he moved to Harwinton, being one of 
the original settlers; and, buying a tract of 
land that was in its primitive wildness, he 
cleared and improved a homestead. At the 
time he settled in Harwinton, deer, bears, and 
rattlesnakes were plenty; but a four-wheeled 
carriage of any sort was a thing unknown. Of 
a Sabbath morning church-goers made their 
way to the place of worship either afoot or 
on horseback, the women of the different fam- 
ilies seated on pillions behind their travelling 
companions. John Preston must have come to 
Windham with a two-wheeled cart drawn by 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



323 



oxen; for he brought certain household goods 
with him, among which was a cedar pork 
barrel inscribed with the date of 1737, which 
is still in the possession of the family. In 
those days it was considered an evidence of 
thriftlessness and improvidence for a man to 
be out of pork ; but as shad were cheap and 
plenty, it was not an uncommon occurrence to 
see a man coming from the Connecticut River 
on horseback with a few dozen shad thrown 
behind him on his horse, a sight sure to bring 
forth the sometimes unjust comment from the 
onlooker of, "That man is out of pork." 
John Preston, the third, married Miss Miriam 
Bristol, a native of Harwinton, and the daugh- 
ter of Aaron Bristol, a pioneer of the place, 
and they reared to lives of usefulness their six 
children, namely: Miriam, who married Jo- 
seph Halsted, of Trenton, N.J. ; Noah, who 
married Honor Rossiter; John S. ; Garner, 
who married Bethena Upson ; Lucina, who 
married Jehiel Ford ; and Ursula, who married 
Lemuel Humphreyville and lived to the re- 
markable age of one hundred and two years. 

John S. Preston, son of John and Maria 
(Bristol) Preston, was born December 5, 
1769, and was a lifelong resident of Harwin- 
ton, being a prosperous agriculturist and a 
man of prominence in local and State affairs. 
His wife, Aurelia Dewey, a daughter of Eli 
Dewey, of Harwinton, was born September 5, 
1774. Their entire wedded life was spent on 
the home farm, where they reared their family 
of nine children. In politics he was a Feder- 
alist at the time of his majority, but later 
became identified with the Whigs, and was 
chosen to represent his town in the legislature. 

The boyhood days of James J. Preston were 
spent on the parental homestead, and were re- 
plete with the incidents and experiences of life 
in the early part of the present century, before 
the days of railroads. He was an attendant 



of the district school during the winters, and in 
the season of seed-time and harvest assisted on 
the farm, obtaining a practical insight into its 
labors and duties. At the age of nineteen he 
began the battle of life on his own account, 
and for seven years was engaged as a travelling 
salesman of tinware and dry goods. Desiring 
to settle down to some permanent business, he 
then bought a farm in the town of Canaan, 
where he lived two years, when he purchased 
the homestead he now occupies, and which he 
has since carried on with good success. It 
contains twenty-two acres of choice land, and 
is beautifully located on the hill overlooking 
the village of Winsted and the surrounding 
country, commanding a charming view. 

Mr. Preston was married November 21, 
1841, to Adaline Camp, who was born in Win- 
chester in this county, January 3, 1817. Mrs. 
Preston is a daughter of Moses Camp, who was 
born in Norfolk in 1774, and a grand-daughter 
of Moses Camp, Sr., a native, it is thought, of 
the town of New Milford, of early English 
antecedents. He was a pioneer settler of Nor- 
folk, where he carried on general husbandry 
until his decease. Mrs. Preston's father 
learned the hatter's trade, and in company 
with his brother Samuel was engaged in the 
manufacture of hats until 1804. He then sold 
"out and bought the Stephen Knowlton farm, 
located on the side hill, a mile south-east of 
Winsted; and from that time until his death, 
March 6, 1852, he was prosperously engaged 
in agriculture. He bought the farm where his 
son Moses now resides, and where his death 
occurred. His wife, mother of Mrs. Preston, 
was Diadema Knowlton Camp, a daughter of 
Stephen and Diadema (Chubb) Knowlton. 
She was born in Winchester, October 15, 
1784, and lived until August 11, 1884, having 
almost completed a century of life. 

Mrs. Camp was always blessed with good 



324 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



health, never having had any long sickness, 
her final illness being less than an hour. 
Only a few hours before the change she re- 
marked that her memory had failed to such an 
extent that she considered herself a know-noth- 
ing. Some one jokingly replied that she had 
better join a know-nothing society, at which 
she looked up, laughing, and said, "I should 
not have to go far." She was an esteemed 
member of the Congregational church, and 
reared her family in the same faith. Her 
father was a soldier of the Revolution, and the 
name of Knowlton is an honored one in the 
military annals of Connecticut. Her only liv- 
ing son is Moses Camp, a well-to-do farmer, 
residing on the old homestead. He married 
Amelia Worthington, a native of East Had- 
dam and a daughter of Edward and Elizabeth 
(Willey) Worthington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Preston have one son, James 
H., who was born April 15, 1849. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Van Valkenburg, the three 
children born of their union being : Adelaide, 
a graduate of Smith College, Northampton, 
Mass., now teaching French and German in 
Portsmouth, N. H. ; Blanche; and May. In 
politics Mr. Preston has always stood on the 
side devoted to the highest interests of human- 
ity, having been a strong abolitionist in his 
earlier days, later a strong Republican, and 
now a firm and influential Prohibitionist. Re- 
ligiously, he and his wife are consistent and 
active members of the Congregational church. 

As may be gathered from the above, they are 
worthy representatives of good old New Eng- 
land families. 



W: 



«-*-» 



ville. 



ILLIAM H. KNICKERBOCKER, 
who has conducted a successful 
blacksmithing business at Wood- 
in the town of Washington, for many 



years, was born in Kent, Conn., November 



26, 1836, son of William and Harriet (John- 
son) Knickerbocker. Mr. Knickerbocker's 
father was a native of Dover, N. Y. ; and when 
a young man he learned the tailor's trade, 
which he followed during the active period of 
his life. He settled in Kent, where he re- 
sided for many years, becoming well and favor- 
ably known as an industrious and useful 
citizen. His last days were spent in Provi- 
dence, R.I. , where he died at the age of 
seventy-three years. His wife, Harriet John- 
son, who was a daughter of Hezekiah Johnson, 
of Kent, became the mother of the following 
children : Julia, who became Mrs. Monroe, 
and has two children — George and Mary; 
Frederick; Oscar; Delia, a twin sister of the 
latter, who became Mrs. Taylor, and had five 
children, namely — William, Mary, Ida, Louis, 
and Martha; William H., the subject of this 
sketch ; and Edward, who was twice married, 
his first wife being Ellen Varney and his sec- 
ond Ellen Fluntley. The mother lived to 
reach the age of seventy-six years. 

William H. Knickerbocker received his 
education in the district schools, and at the 
age of fifteen began work at the forge. After 
learning the blacksmith's trade he worked as a 
journeyman, and finally settled in Washington 
in the village of Woodville, where he has 
carried on a thriving business for over thirty 
years. During his long residence in Wood- 
ville he has acquired a high reputation as 
a skilled and reliable workman, and has 
met with the usual reward of well-directed 
industry. 

In 1 871 Mr. Knickerbocker was united in 
marriage to Emma Briggs, daughter of David 
Briggs, of Washington, and has one son, Harry 
by name. Mr. Knickerbocker is a Democrat 
in politics, and has well served the town as 
grand juror, Constable, and in other offices. 
He attends the Congregational church. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



325 



Tj^ARCISSE J. THIBAULT, a leading 
I =J contractor and builder in Winsted, 
-1^ x^ ^ was born in Quebec in 1848, son 
of Gregoireand Rose (Marcise) Thibault. His 
father was born in St. Thomas, Canada, in 
1803, and died on his farm in that town in 
1888. The widow is still a resident of that 
place. They had seven sons and seven daugh- 
ters, all of whom are living save one, Louis, 
who died at the age of twenty years. 

The child who is one of a large family is 
usually obliged to cultivate a spirit of indepen- 
dence unknown to the one who is his parent's 
only care. This spirit was early developed in 
young Narcisse Thibault; and at the age of fif- 
teen he left home and started on his indepen- 
dent career, the first four years of which were 
spent on a farm in Nova Scotia. Then the 
lumber industry, which is the source of much 
of the wealth of that country, engaged his 
attention; and he later learned the carpenter's 
trade, working at it in the Dominion for about 
six months. In March, 1870, he came to 
Winsted, working as journeyman for some 
time, but finally starting in business as a con- 
tractor and builder. He was at first in part- 
nership with others, but for the past eight 
years has conducted business alone. He has 
done some fine work in Winsted, the Strong 
& Tanner Block, the Alvord Block, and the 
Winchester Block of West Winsted being 
samples of his workmanship, as well as the 
large buildings on the Highland Lake Farm. 
Mr. Thibault has also erected many dwelling- 
houses. He is doing a good and increasing 
business, employing from eight to ten men. 

In 1878 Mr. Thibault was married to Miss 
Mary Dempsey, a native of Ireland, and by 
her has had four children, one of whom, Greg- 
ory, died in infancy. The living are: Anna, 
aged seventeen; Joseph, fifteen; and Louis, 
nine, all pupils in the Alleghany School. 




Mr. Thibault is independent in politics, vot- 
ing according to his best judgment, regardless 
of party lines. He settled at his present 
home, 17 Elm Street, in 1890. It is pleas- 
antly situated and convenient for business, his 
workshop being on the premises. By steady 
industry and .conscientious work he is slowly 
but surely advancing along the road to honora- 
ble success. 

^-mmm-t 

OLONEL SALMON ALGERNON 
GRANGER, Secretary and Treas- 
urer of the Morgan Silver Plate 
Company of Winsted, was born in New Marl- 
boro, Berkshire County, Mass., August 12, 
1839, and is a descendant of Phineas Granger, 
a soldier of the Revolution, who was born at 
Sufifield, August 7, 1738. Phineas Granger 
joined the minute-men in June, 1777, and 
was under command of Captain Elihu Kent, in 
the Fifth Connecticut line, serving for eight 
months. In 1780 he enlisted in the Second 
Connecticut Regiment, and in 1781 joined the 
ranks of the Third Regiment. He died in the 
service in July, 1781, three months before the 
close of the war. His son Phineas, grand- 
father of Colonel Granger, was a cousin of 
Gideon Granger, the Postmaster-General under 
the presidency of Thomas Jefferson. Grand- 
father Granger was a farmer in good circum- 
stances in New Marlboro. He married Martha 
Newell, of Canaan, who lived to be eighty- 
four years old, dying October 6, 1857. She 
and her husband are buried in the cemetery at 
New Marlboro. They had five children, three 
sons and two daughters, the oldest of whom, 
James L., was the father of ex-Congressman 
Judge Miles Tobey Granger. All of the fam- 
ily lived to a ripe old age, and all but one 
daughter married and had families. 

Gideon Granger, father of Colonel Granger, 
was born in New Marlboro, August 6, 1806, 



326 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and died July 3, 1885. He was twice mar- 
ried, his first wife being Estlier, daughter of 
Salmon and Esther M. Treat, who were farm- 
ing people in easy circumstances. Mrs. 
Granger died at twenty-nine, leaving three 
children, the eldest of whom was Colonel 
Granger. The others are: Sylvenus E. , who 
resides in Winsted ; and Ursula Janette 
Granger, who lives in Riverton. Gideon 
Granger's second wife was in maidenhood Bet- 
sey Lowe, of Troy, N.Y. , who is still living. 
Seven children were born of this union, two 
sons and five daughters. 

Colonel Salmon Algernon Granger, accord- 
ing to a sketch of his career in J. A. Spald- 
ing's Popular Biography of Connecticut, re- 
ceived a fair common-school education and 
learned the carpenter's trade. When a youth 
of eighteen he came to Winsted, where he 
worked at his trade for E. B. Parsons until the 
war broke out. In response to the first call 
for troops he enlisted, April 25, 1861, as pri- 
vate in the Second Connecticut, under the late 
General Alfred H. Terry, and was in the first 
battle of Bull Run. When his term of ser- 
vice expired, he enlisted again, this time in 
the Nineteenth Infantry, subsequently desig- 
nated as the Second Connecticut Heavy Ar- 
tillery, and had risen to the command of 
Company I by the time of Lee's surrender 
at Appomattox. In 1864 Colonel Granger was 
with Sheridan in the great Shenandoah cam- 
paign, and throughout the war he served with 
credit and distinction. At the close of the 
war he accepted the position of superintendent 
of the New England Pin Company of Win- 
sted, which he held for twenty-two years. In 
1888 he was one of the organizers of the 
Morgan Silver Plate Company, of which he is 
now Secretary and Treasurer. 

On December 19, i860, Colonel Granger 
married Carrie A., daughter of Newton C. 



Potter, of Torrington ; and four children 
blessed their union. Two are deceased: an 
infant daughter, born February 14, 1866; and 
a son, born March 3, 1873, who lived only five 
months. Ralph Stuart Granger, a young man 
of twenty, is a cadet in the United States 
Military Academy at West Point, a member of 
the class of 1898; and William Bradley 
Granger is a member of the class of 1896 in 
the Gilbert School of Winsted. 

Colonel Granger is a Democrat in politics. 
He has been Aide-de-camp on the Governor's 
staff, with the rank of Colonel, since his ap- 
pointment to that rank by the late Governor 
Morris. He is also interested in educational 
matters, and served several years on School 
Committee. He is Past Master of St. An- 
drew's Lodge (Winsted), A. F. & A. M. ; 
Past H. P. of Meridian Chapter, and has at- 
tained the thirty-second degree in Masonry. 
He also belongs to the Odd Fellows, and is 
Past Grand Regent of the Connecticut Royal 
Arcanum and Grand Treasurer of the 
N. E. O. P. of Connecticut. He has also 
held the office of Junior Vice-Commander of 
the Grand Army in this State. Colonel 
Granger is a Trustee of the Methodist church, 
of which he has been a member since 1859. 



bfREI 



RED. L. WADHAMS, a prominent 
Ijlj lumber manufacturer of Torrington, 
Conn., was born on December 4, 1842, 
in Goshen, an adjoining town, of which his 
parents, James and Sarah L. (Oviatt) Wad- 
hams, were both natives. His grandfather, 
Norman Wadhams, who was a lifelong resi- 
dent there, was a stone cutter by trade. He 
died at the age of seventy -four. 

James Wadhams was one of six children. 
He remained in Goshen until about eighteen 
or nineteen years of age, when he went to 




F, L. WADHAMS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



329 



Newark, N.J., to learn the wheelwright's 
trade. After finishing his apprenticeship he 
worked for a time in Newark, and then re- 
turned to Goshen, where he purchased a farm, 
on which he spent the rest of his life. He 
died at the age of sixty-eight. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Sarah L. Oviatt, was 
a daughter of Luman Oviatt, a native of 
Goshen. Luman Oviatt was a prominent 
farmer and large land-owner in that town. 
He was twice married, and had thirteen chil- 
dren, all of whom lived to grow up. His 
second wife, Alosia Sandford, of Torrington, 
was the mother of three children, of whom 
Sarah L., Mrs. James Wadhams, was the first- 
born. Mr. and Mrs. James Wadhams were 
members of the Congregational church. Four 
children were born to them, two of whom are 
now living, namely: Fred. L., the subject of 
this sketch; and Abner H., a carpenter and 
joiner of Torrington. The mother died in her 
twenty-ninth year. 

Fred. L. Wadhams lived with his parents 
until thirteen years of age, when he went to 
reside with his grandmother. He received 
his education in the common schools and at 
the Goshen Academy. When a youth of eigh- 
teen, he enlisted in Company I, Thirteenth 
Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, as a private, 
was in active service three years, participating 
in several hard-fought battles. He was taken 
prisoner September 19, 1864, at Winchester, 
and was paroled in December at Belle Island. 
He received his discharge in January, 1865, 
and returning to Goshen remained at home 
till the fall of that year, when he entered the 
employ of the Turner & Seymour Manufactur- 
ing Company of Torrington. In the winter 
of 1866-67 he attended a business school in 
Bridgeport. In the spring of 1867 he went 
West, and a year later returned to Torrington, 
and opened a meat market, which he con- 



ducted about two years. He then purchased 
the water privilege, putting in the saw-mill of 
which he is now proprietor, and has since 
been prosperously engaged in the manufacture 
of lumber, conducting a large business. 

Mr. Wadhams was married in 1871 to Sarah 
M., daughter of William Goodwin, a farmer 
of New Hartford, Conn., where the Goodwin 
family were early settlers. Mrs. Wadhams's 
parents are both departed, her mother having 
died within the past year. They had five 
children, four of whom are now living, the 
brothers of Mrs. Wadhams being Lewis, Will- 
iam, and Fred Goodwin. Four children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Wadhams, namely: 
Fred U-, a graduate of Yale College in the 
class of 189S; Sanford H., a graduate of 
Sheffield College, who is now studying at the 
Yale Medical School; Herbert, in the Excel- 
sior Needle Company's office; and Clarence, 
who is still with his parents. 

In politics Mr. Wadhams is a Republican. 
He is prominently identified with the fraternal 
orders of the town, belonging to Seneca 
Lodge, No. 55, A. F. & A. M., of Torring- 
ton, Hope Grange, also the Knights of Honor, 
and Steele Post, No. 34, Grand Army of the 
Republic. The family are connected with the 
Congregational church of the town, Mr. Wad- 
hams attending service there and his wife and 
two eldest sons being members of that church, 
in which Mrs. Wadhams is very active. Mr. 
Wadhams is a man of superior intelligence 
and fine social qualities, very popular in Tor- 
rington, where he has resided for upward of a 
quarter of a century. He lived in New Haven 
from 1 89 1 to 1894, while his children were 
being educated in that city. With this ex- 
ception, since 1865 his home has been in 
Torrington; and his business and social 
record places him among the leading citizens 
of the place. 



33° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 






■UGUSTUS B. CAMP, a successful 
farmer and a prominent resident of 
Warren, was born in Kent, Conn., 
November it, 1832, son of Miles and Cyrene 
(Beeman) Camp. Mr. Camp's grandfather, 
Chauncey Camp, was a prosperous farmer of 
New Preston, where the major portion of his 
life was spent. He married a Miss Baldwin, 
and both he and his wife lived to the advanced 
age of ninety years. Their children were: 
Jeremiah, Miles, Sheldon, Burr, Clarissa, and 
Comfort. 

Miles Camp, father of Mr. Camp, born in 
New Preston, settled in early manhood upon a 
farm in Kent Hollow, where he enjoyed a 
prosperous career as a farmer for over seventy 
yeai-s. He was a prominent man in the com- 
munity, took an active part in political affairs, 
and was in his religious belief a Congrega- 
tionalist. He was an unusual instance of 
longevity, as he lived to the remarkable age 
of one hundred and three years. His wife, 
daughter of Daniel Beeman, of Warren, 
reared eight children, as follows: William, 
who died aged eight years; Henry P., who 
married three times; Charles, who married 
Ruth Strong, and has two children, named 
F^ergus M. and Charles; George, who married 
Sarah Warner, and has two children, named 
Hattie and Ida; Harriet, who is now Mrs. 
Newton; Daniel, who married Laura Hill, 
both of whom with their children, Isabell and 
Daniel R., are deceased; Augustus B., the 
subject of this sketch; and Augusta S., twin 
sister of Augustus B., now Mrs. Mark Ken- 
ney, and mother of four children, named 
Miles, Abner, Wall, and Burton. Henry P. 
Camp's first marriage was with Maria Strong, 
who died, leaving one child. His next was 
with Melissa Thomas, who with the seven 
children she bore him is now deceased; and 
his third marriage was with Cornelia Thomas. 



The mother died at the age of ninety-eight 
years. 

Augustus B. Camp, who was educated in 
the district schools of his native town, at an 
early age commenced to assist his father on 
the farm. He resided at home until his ma- 
jority, when he purchased a farm, upon which 
he settled, and engaged in general agricult- 
ure on his own account. He cultivated his 
land with success for a number of years, 
thereby attaining a high degree of proficiency 
in his calling. In 1882 he moved to Warren 
village, where he has since resided. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican, and has figured prom- 
inently in public affairs. He has displayed 
executive ability and good judgment of more 
than ordinary merit in the capacities of 
Assessor, Collector, Constable, member of 
the School Board, and grand juror. 

On November 16, 1853, Mr. Camp was 
united in marriage to his first wife, who was 
before marriage Mary A. Peet, daughter of 
Riley Peet, of New Milford, Conn. She 
died at the age of twenty-four years, leaving 
one daughter, Mary, now wife of F. S. Gib- 
son, of Kent Hollow, and mother of one child, 
Julia. In 1858 Mr. Camp wedded for his 
second wife Julia Strong, daughter of David 
and Ann is (Sutliff) Strong. David Strong 
died at the age of ninety and his wife at that 
of fifty-six years. The children reared by 
them were: William, Sarah, Noble, Julia, 
and Edward. Mr. and Mrs. Camp attend the 
Congregational church, and Mr. Camp is 
superintendent of the Sunday-school. 



/^HARLES H. NICHOLS, an ener- 
i Jl getic and practical farmer of Wash- 

^«i2 — ' ington, was born in Bridgeport, 
Conn., November 18, 1850, son of William 
A. and Edna H. (Smith) Nichols. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



331 



Mr. Nichols's great-grandfather on the 
paternal side was Edward Nichols, who was a 
resident of Woodbury, Conn., where he passed 
the greater portion of his life. His son Rus- 
sell settled in Bridgeport, where he engaged 
in farming, and where he resided until his 
death, which took place when he had reached 
an advanced age. He married Huldah 
Turner, and they reared a family of three chil- 
dren; namely, William A., John, and Delia. 
Mrs. Russell Nichols lived to reach the age of 
eighty-three years. William A. Nichols was 
born in Bridgeport. When a young man, he 
learned the carpenter's trade, which he fol- 
lowed successfully, becoming widely and 
favorably known as a skilled and reliable me- 
chanic; but his career was cut short by death 
at the early age of thirty-six years. His 
wife, Edna H. Smith, who was a daughter of 
Nathan Smith, of Roxbury, reared one son, 
Charles H., whose name appears above. The 
mother died at the age of fifty-three years. 
Charles H. Nichols was educated in the 
schools of Bridgeport, and after completing 
his studies entered mercantile pursuits, find- 
ing employment as a clerk, in which capacity, 
he continued for eight years. He then re- 
linquished mercantile life, and settled in 
Washington, this county, where he purchased 
a farm of eighty acres, and has since been 
prosperously engaged in agriculture. He has 
attained a prominent position among the 
farmers of Washington, and is a member of 
Washington Grange. In his political views 
he is a Democrat. 



W" 



'ILLIAM D. STONE, a progres- 
sive farmer of the Lower Merryall 
District in the town of New Mil- 
ford, Conn., was born May 7, 1863, upon the 
farm near by which is owned and occupied by 



his father, Duane Stone. Mr. Stone is a de- 
scendant of Benajah Stone, who came from 
Branford, New Haven County, to New Milford 
in 1742, and bought seventy acres of the 
North Purchase. 

In 1749 Benajah Stone bought a tract of 
land situated north of Park Lane, upon which 
he settled and engaged in agricultural labors 
with energy and success. He increased his 
acreage by the purchase of more land, and be- 
came one of the leading farmers and prominent 
citizens of the town. He and his wife reared 
a family of eight children. Their son Ithiel 
settled in 1753 in that part of New Milford 
known as the Upper Merryall District. He 
was a man of influence in the town and an 
honored and patriotic citizen, rendering much 
valuable service in the cause of independence 
by recruiting soldiers for the Continental 
army. He married Martha, daughter of The- 
ophilus Baldwin, and reared but one son, 
Julius, who was Mr. Stone's great-grand- 
father. 

Julius Stone owned and conducted the farm 
where Duane Stone now resides, being a pro- 
gressive farmer and a useful citizen. He 
served as a soldier in the War of 181 2, and 
died in 1835, aged eighty-one years. His 
wife, Esther Sperry Wheaton, widow of 
Joseph Wheaton, died in 1847, at the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-nine years. The chil- 
dren of Julius Stone were: Chauncey, Julia, 
and Nancy. 

Chauncey Stone, Mr. Stone's grandfather, 
was born at the homestead, September 22, 
1788. He succeeded to the ownership of the 
farm, and built the present residence. He 
improved his land, upon which he conducted 
general farming with success, but devoted a 
greater part of his time to the raising and 
breaking of oxen for teaming purposes. He 
was prominent in local public affairs, with 



332 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



which he was closely identified for many 
years; and in religion he was an Episcopalian. 
He died in 1856, aged sixty- seven. He mar- 
ried Amy Wadhams, and had seven children, 
namely: Benjamin J. ; Julia; Esther; Albina; 
Nancy; Duane and Delia, the last two being 
twins. Mrs. Amy W. Stone lived to reach 
the age of eighty-two years, and died in 1875. 
Duane Stone, son of Chauncey and Amy 
Stone, was born at the Stone homestead, where 
he now resides, January i, 1835. He re- 
ceived a district-school education; and at the 
age of nineteen he commenced teaching 
school, an occupation which he followed for 
some years. He later went to Jefferson, Ky., 
where he was employed in a freight office for 
three years, at the end of which time he re- 
turned to New Milford, and bought the home- 
stead. He has added more land to the estate 
and made various improvements, having 
erected a spacious barn and wagon house, and 
has at the present time one of the finest set of 
farm buildings in his locality. He is en- 
gaged in tobacco-raising and in cattle deal- 
ing, keeping an average of seventy-five head, 
which he fattens for the market, and also de- 
voting considerable attention to breeding 
fancy steers and oxen. He is a Republican in 
politics, and has served with ability in vari- 
ous town offices. He attends the Episcopal 
church. His wife, whom he married on May 
7, 1 86 1, Anna E. Hawley, a daughter of Ben- 
jamin and Emeline (Glover) Hawley, has had 
three children, as follows: William D., the 
subject of this sketch; Clarence, who died in 
1 891, aged eighteen years; and Florence, who 
is now a teacher. 

William D. Stone was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of New Milford; and, after com- 
pleting his studies, he assisted his father in 
general farming and in the cattle business. 
In young manhood he settled upon a farm in 



Newtown, which he successfully conducted 
until 1 891, when he returned to New Milford, 
and purchased the Nickerson farm of fifty 
acres, which is situated in the Lower Merryall 
District, where he has since resided. He has 
improved the land and buildings; and aside 
from general farming he has a dairy, and deals 
in stock to some extent. He possesses the 
vigor and ambition of youth, which, together 
with the ability he displays in managing his 
farm, are sufficient assurance of his future 
prosperity. 

On April 8, 1886, Mr. Stone was united in 
marriage with Ellen Hall, daughter of John 
and Frances J. (Clark) Hall. They have 
three children: Anna F., Marian E., and 
Clarence. Mr. Stone is a Republican in poli- 
tics and an Episcopalian in his church affilia- 
tions. 




RS. MARY L. ALVORD, a most 
estimable lady residing in Win- 
sted. Conn., is the widow of the 
late James R. Alvord, who died there Febru- 
ary 17, 1890, aged sixty-six years four 
months and ten days. Grandfather Alvord 
was a farmer in the town of Haddam, Conn., 
where he married a Miss Hall, who reared him 
three sons and four daughters. He died when 
a young man. One of his sons, who followed 
a seafaring life, perished at sea. The 
mother died in Utica, N.Y., where she had 
lived for many years with a bachelor son. 

Deacon Joseph H. Alvord, the father of 
James R. Alvord, was born in Haddam, 
Hartford County, Conn., about the year 1779. 
He followed the trade of a harness-maker and 
saddler, conducting the business in Haddam 
and subsequently in Winsted, to which town 
he removed in 181 1. Soon after his removal 
he built a comfortable and substantial cottage 
at the east end of Winsted, where he passed 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



333 



the remainder of his life. He gave to his 
children all the educational advantages it was 
in his power to furnish. In 1804 Joseph H. 
Alvord was united in marriage with Miss 
Lucy Cook, who was born in Haddam in 
1784. Twelve children were born of this 
union, of whom three accompanied them when 
they removed to Winsted. They buried two 
young sons and a daughter. The latter, Mary 
Cook Alvord, was twenty-one years of age 
when she died. There were seven sons, all 
of whom are deceased except Jabez Al- 
vord, the youngest of the family, who re- 
sides in Winsted. He has never married, 
and is a retired machinist. John W. Alvord, 
who was a Congregationalist minister and 
Secretary of the Boston Tract Society, was 
also prominent in the Freedmen's Bureau, 
in which he was succeeded by Fred Douglass. 
He died in Denver, Col., where he was stay- 
ing temporarily, and is buried in the family 
lot in Winsted. He was well advanced in the 
seventies at the time of his death, and left a 
widow, who resides in Chicago, and two sons, 
and a daughter. George Alvord, who con- 
ducted a printing establishment in Winsted, 
died in middle life, leaving a widow but no 
children. Charles Alvord left a widow, who 
resides in Winsted, and four children, two 
sons and two daughters. 

James R. Alvord, who was born January 31, 
1 82 1, received a good practical education, and 
at fifteen years of age began his business 
career as a salesman. On December 3, 1849, 
he was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. 
Landon, daughter of the Rev. Seymour and 
Phebe (Thompson) Landon, the former of 
whom was a Methodist clergyman. The 
mother was a native of Ticonderoga, N.Y., 
born near the fort, October 4, 1796. The 
Rev. Seymour Landon's birth occurred May 
3, 1798. Mrs. Alvord was one of four chil- 



dren, two sons and two daughters; and she and 
her brother, Thompson H. Landon, the young- 
est, who is in his sixty-fifth year, are the 
only survivors. The latter is a Methodist 
preacher, and at the present time is at the 
head of the Military School of Bordentown, 
N.J. Their mother died at the home of Mrs. 
Alvord, and their father in Jamaica, L.I., at 
the home of his adopted daughter, in 1880, 
eighty-two years of age. He was in the itin- 
erancy from his twenty-first year up to a date 
near the time of his death, and was a member 
of the New York Conference when it extended 
from New York City to Canada. He lived to 
preach his half-century anniversary sermon. 
Mrs. Alvord has lost three children : Elliott 
B., who died August 19, 1859, aged one year 
and seventeen days; James R., who died 
August 18, 1865, at fifteen years of age; and 
Louise Landon Alvord, whose death occurred 
on January 4, 1870, when seventeen years of 
age. The last named was a promising young 
student, and possessed a lovely character. 
The living are: Charles L. Alvord, who re- 
sides with his mother, is married, and has 
two sons, D. Fletcher and Elliott L. ; Sey- 
mour L. Alvord, who is married, and has 
three children — Louise L., Edith Owen, and 
Russell; George Stevens Alvord, a silk sales- 
man for the Armstrong Silk Company in 
Boston; Amanda M., wife of Deacon John 
Hinsdale, who has two children, John W. and 
Mary; and Mrs. Susan Rice, whose husband, 
Asahel Rice, died in Winsted about 1893, 
leaving her with one daughter, Harriet. 
Charles L. and Seymour L. Alvord are en- 
gaged in the Empire Knife Company, which 
was established by Beardslee & Alvord forty- 
three years ago. Mrs. Alvord resides at 23 
Meadow Street, which has been her residence 
for forty-four years. She and her husband 
were both members of the Congregational 



334 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Church of Winsted. They spent forty-one 
years of happy wedded life together. 



W' 



ILLIAM H. HINE was born in 
New Milford, Litchfield County, 
Conn., June 19, 1816, son of 
Lyman and Hannah (Roberts) Hine. His 
birth occurred in the house located next to his 
late residence, the present home of his widow, 
Mrs. Elizabeth G. Hine, which is situated 
upon Candlewood Mountain, where he died 
on December 11, 1893. Lyman Hine was en- 
gaged in manufacturing fire brick; and after 
he retired from business his sons, William H. 
and George, conducted the enterprise until 
1883, when the former relinquished active 
pursuits. 

In early manhood William H. Hine pur- 
chased a farm of one hundred and fifty acres, 
which he carried on in connection with his 
brick business; and in 1842 he erected the 
house in which Mrs. Hine now lives, besides 
making other improvements in the property. 
He was particularly interested in stock-rais- 
ing, always owning some of the best cattle in 
the town; and he carried on general agricult- 
ure with the most gratifying results. In 
politics he was a Republican, and held several 
of the important town offices of trust, in which 
he displayed a zealous desire to forward the 
best interests of the community. He also 
served as a Justice of the Peace. He was an 
active member of the Congregational church, 
of which he was Deacon for over thirty years; 
and he was a leading spirit in promoting the 
religious welfare of the town. 

On January 4, 1843, Mr. Hine was united 
in marriage to Elizabeth Gaylord, daughter of 
Nathan and Irene (Downs) Gaylord. Mrs. 
Hine is a lineal descendant of Deacon Will- 
iam Gaylord, who with his wife and children 



came from England on board the " Mary and 
John" in 1630. He was the first Deacon of 
the church in Dorchester, Mass., but after- 
ward moved to Windsor, Conn. The line of 
descent continues through Walter and Mary 
(Stebbins) Gaylord, Joseph and Sarah (Stan- 
ley) Gaylord, to William and Joanna (Miner) 
Gaylord, the former of whom was the first 
member of the family to settle in New Mil- 
ford. He was a prosperous farmer and the 
owner of large tracts of land in what is now 
Gaylordsville, which was named on account of 
his being the first white settler there. He 
was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and 
the records of the family contain accounts of 
his interesting experience with the Indians. 
Mrs. Hine's great-grandparents were Aaron 
and Phebe (Smith) Gaylord; and her grand- 
parents were Ebenezer and Catherine (Chit- 
tenden) Gaylord, who were all natives and 
lifelong residents of New Milford. Nathan 
Gaylord, Mrs. Hine's father, was born No- 
vember 10, 1783, and became an energetic 
and progressive farmer. He resided in New 
Milford until his death, which occurred in 
1865. His wife, Irene Downs, became the 
mother of seven children, all of whom grew 
to maturity. 

M. and Mrs. Hine became the parents of 
three children, as follows: Helen L. was born 
August 18, 1848, and died March 19, 1850; 
Henry D., born January 19, 1852, married 
Ella A. Beach, and is now a painter in New 
Milford; and Mary E., born March 26, 1855, 
resides with her mother. Mrs. Hine possesses 
a vigorous constitution, and is blessed with 
good health. She is among the most promi- 
nent of the old residents of New Milford, and 
is highly esteemed by a large circle of friends 
and acquaintances. 

On the opposite page will be seen a portrait 
of the late Deacon William H. Hine, who is 




WILLIAM H. HINE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



337 



held in honored remembrance as a public- 
spirited and eminently useful citizen. 



-AMES G. SKILTON, a successful 
farmer of Watertown and a representa- 
tive of a prominent family in that sec- 
tion, was born in this town, March 3, 1856, 
son of George F. and Abigail (Wilcox) Skil- 
ton. The original ancestor of the family in 
America was Dr. Henry Skilton, who emi- 
grated from England, and settled in Groton, 
Conn., where he practised medicine for many 
years. Besides following his profession he 
engaged in agriculture, was a large land- 
owner, operated a mill, and carried on other 
business. He also ably^ officiated as a 
preacher upon various occasions in South- 
ington. The last years of his life were 
passed in Watertown. The^ descent continued 
through his only son, Avery, who followed 
farming in Watertown and Bethlehem. Mr. 
"Skilton's grandfather was Captain James 
Skilton, who was born in Bethlehem, and 
settled in Watertown when he was seventeen 
years old. He was a school-teacher of note 
in his day, and was also an able and success- 
ful farmer. He labored industriously during 
the active period of his life, the major part 
of which was passed in Watertown, where he 
died in 1848, aged over seventy years. He 
was the father of seven sons, of whom George 
F., Mr. Skilton's father, was the youngest. 

George F. Skilton was born at the home- 
stead in Watertown, and was reared to an 
agricultural life. He commenced at an early 
age to assist in carrying on the farm; and 
after the death of his father he succeeded to 
the property, which he managed with energy 
during the rest of his life. He died in the 
house where he was born, in July, 1895, aged 
over seventy-five years. He was a prominent 



member of the Methodist Episcopal church for 
fifty-eight years, having served as a class 
leader, Steward, and Trustee. He was first 
married to Wealthy M. Munn, of Watertown, 
who died at the age of twenty-eight, leaving 
one daughter, named Emily, who married 
Charles J. Cook, of Cheshire. He entered 
matrimony a second time with Abigail Wil- 
cox, who was born in Wolcottville, now Tor- 
rington,. December 16, 1827, daughter of 
George W. and Elmira (Richards) Wilcox. 
Her father, who was engaged in the woollen 
factory in that town, subsequently moved to 
Ohio, and later to Michigan, where he resided 
for the rest of his life, and died at the age of 
seventy-five. He and his wife, who was a na- 
tive of Canaan, Conn., reared six children, 
four of whom are living, namely: Abigail, 
who became Mrs. Skilton ; George T., Albert 
J., and Merritt C, who are residents of Mich- 
igan. The mother died in Michigan, at the 
age of seventy-five. Mrs. George F. Skilton 
has been the mother of five children, of whom 
four are now living, and are as follows: 
Nellie, who married S. H. Jones; James G., 
the subject of this sketch; Albert W. ; and 
Carrie M. The mother, who still survives, is 
living with her children. 

James G. Skilton received his education in 
the common schools ; and at the age of nine- 
teen he commenced teaching school in Water- 
town, which he followed as an occupation for 
six seasons. At the age of twenty-four he 
began farming upon his own account; and 
after the death of his wife's father he moved 
to his present farm, where he has since re- 
sided. This property consists of eighty acres 
of desirable land. This with another farm of 
his is devoted to general farming and dairy 
purposes, for which he also keeps a herd of 
twenty-five cows. He is a progressive man, 
and conducts his agricultural operations with 



338 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the degree of liberality that is a guarantee of 
success. He is a Republican in politics, and 
has served with ability as Tax Collector and 
grand juror. He is also agent of the Hu- 
mane Society. 

In 1880 Mr. Skilton was united in mar- 
riage to Eliza A. Judson, daughter of Thomas 
F. and Ann B. (Millard) Judson. The 
former, who was a native of Woodbury, and 
became a prosperous farmer and cattle dealer 
of Watertown, died at the age of sixty-one 
years. His wife, who was born in Cornwall, 
has reared seven children, and is now living 
with her daughter, Mrs. Skilton. She is a 
bright, intelligent lady and exceedingly active 
for one of her years. Mr. and Mrs. Skilton 
have four children, as follows: Ada M., Alice 
M., Edna A., and Lora Agnes. The family 
are all members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, with which Mr. Skilton has long been 
connected as Steward, Trustee, a member of 
the official board, and superintendent of the 
Sunday-school. He is also a member of the 
Watertown Grange. 




|ISS ISABELLA ELDRIDGE, of 

Norfolk, is a daughter of the late 
Rev. Joseph and Sarah (Battell) 
Eldridge.- The Rev. Joseph Eldridge was 
born in Yarmouth, Mass., July 8, 1804. He 
prepared for college at Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass., and in September, 1825, en- 
tered Yale University, from which he gradu- 
ated with second honors in the class of 1829. 
He immediately commenced his theological 
studies at the same university. After com- 
pleting his course he was ordained as a minis- 
ter September 25, 1832, and installed as pas- 
tor of the Congregational church in Norfolk. 
During his long term as pastor of this church, 
which extended through a period of forty-two 



years, Mr. Eldridge exhibited a love and ca- 
pacity for the Christian ministry that gained 
for him a reputation extending far beyond the 
limits of his pastorate; while his zeal for the 
increase and development of the church in 
general was highly appreciated by a large 
number of Christian workers. He always 
manifested a deep interest in educational 
matters, and assisted many young men to pro- 
cure an education, both by counsel and finan- 
cial aid. Mr. Eldridge continued as pastor 
of the church in Norfolk until 1874, when 
failing health forced him to retire from active 
labor. He reluctantly resigned his pastorate 
on November i of that year, being at that 
time the oldest minister in active service in 
the State. He died in Norfolk, March 31, 
1875. The New York Independent in notic- 
ing his death alluded to him as a man of fine 
culture, keen wit, and sound sense, command- 
ing a strong influence throughout his section' 
and maintaining a home which was the centre 
of all that is beautiful and gracious in the 
Christian ministry. 

The Rev. Joseph Eldridge married Sarah 
Battell, daughter of Joseph Battell, who was a 
native of Milford, Conn., and moved from 
there to Torrington, and subsequently to Nor- 
folk, where he passed the remainder of his 
days. Mrs. Eldridge died in June, 1878, 
leaving six children; namely, Sarah, Irene, 
Mary, Joseph B., Isabella, and Alice Brad- 
ford. Irene is now Mrs. Edward T. Swift; 
and Alice Bradford is now Mrs. Henry H. 
Bridgman. Mrs. Swift has three children, 
namely: Edward E., who married Florence 
Wilson, daughter of J. Wilson, of Philadel- 
phia; Irene B. ; and Mary E. Mrs. Bridg- 
man has one child, named Eldridge. 

Isabella Eldridge has presented the village 
of Norfolk with a public library, which she 
also maintains. The building, which was de- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



339 



signed by George Keller, of Hartford, was 
commenced in 1888, and completed and 
opened in March, 1 889. It contained seventy- 
five hundred choice books ; and it is under the 
efficient charge of Mr. H. H. Eddy, a gradu- 
ate of Williams College in the class of 1893. 
He came from the Pratt Institute Library of 
Brooklyn, N.Y. The library is open daily 
from 9 A.M. to 9.30 P.M., and is much ap- 
preciated by the residents of this town and 
vicinity. 

Upon Norfolk Green stands a beautiful 
fountain, which was presented to the village 
by Mary Eldridge in 1889, in memory of her 
uncle, Joseph Battell. It was designed by 
Stanford White; while the design for the fish, 
which ornaments the top of the structure, 
was furnished by the famous sculptor, St. 
Gaudens. Both the fountain and the library 
are supplied with pure water from a hill, situ- 
ated about one mile and a half distant. Miss 
Eldridge occupies a beautiful home, the sur- 
roundings of which are constantly kept in a 
pleasing condition. 




'ARVEY DEMING, deceased, who 
was cut off in the middle of ,a use- 
L^ V. , ful life, was for many years identi- 
fied with the leading interests of the town of 
Colebrook, and is remembered by the people 
of this section of Litchfield County as one of 
its most worthy residents. He was born in 
the town of Colebrook, January 27, 1827, son 
of Allen Deming, a lifelong resident of the 
same town and a grandson of Daniel Deming, 
an early settler of Colebrook. Daniel Dem- 
ing was a shoemaker by trade. He laid down 
his last to join a company of minute-men in 
the Revolution, as proved by the presence of 
his name in the glorious roll of those who 
fought for the independence we now enjoy. 



He subsequently bought a tract of land in the 
south-eastern part of Colebrook; and on the 
homestead which he cleared and improved he 
passed his remaining days, dying at the age of 
seventy-four years. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Judith Loomis, attained the age 
of seventy-seven years. She bore him seven 
children, severally named: George, Moses, 
Daniel, Honor, Sally, Allen, and Jared. 

Allen Deming was reared on the farm ; 
and, finding the occupation of tilling the soil 
congenial and profitable, he continued in agri- 
cultural pursuits through his years of activity. 
After attaining his majority, he bought a farm 
at Robertsville, in Colebrook. Among the 
improvements he made was a substantial brick 
residence, which is still in a good state of 
preservation. He was a very successful agri- 
culturist, contributed his full share toward 
the development of the locality, and died at 
the age of eighty-three years. His wife, 
whose maiden -name was Verena Woodruff, 
born at Stonington, Conn., was a daughter of 
Isaiah and Esther (DeWolf) Woodruff, na- 
tives, respectively, of Stonington and Killing- 
worth. She, also, outlived the scriptural 
period of life, dying at the age of seventy-four. 
They had five children; namely, Laura A., 
Wolcott, Lucy, Harvey, and Harriet, all of 
whom grew to maturity. 

Harvey Deming was diligent in taking ad- 
vantage of his opportunities for acquiring 
knowledge. At the age of twenty years he 
began teaching, his first professional experi- 
ence being in the town of Hartland. From 
there he went to the State of New Jersey, 
where he taught with success for several 
terms. Mr. Deming then turned his atten- 
tion to the occupation in which he had been 
reared, and for a time after his marriage 
carried on the old home farm. Subsequently 
purchasing a farm near by, he added stock- 



34° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



raising to general husbandry, and had a thriv- 
ing business for many years. He bought his 
stock in New York State, at times feeding 
over two hundred cattle. In time he became 
the owner of quite an extensive property. 
He added largely to his real estate, further 
improved his homestead by the erection of a 
good set of farm buildings, and rebuilt and 
enlarged his dwelling-house, rendering his 
estate one of the most valuable and desirable 
in the vicinity. In the midst of his many 
private interests Mr. Deming was not unmind- 
ful of the public welfare, which he constantly 
sought to promote. He held various offices in 
the town, and ably represented his district in 
the State legislature in 1861 and 1868. He 
was one of the most zealous advocates of the 
principles of the Democratic party, .and served 
it with fidelity. 

In the month of May,, 1851, Mr. Deming 
was united in marriage with Amarette Spencer, 
who was born December 28, 1830, in Cole- 
brook, daughter of John Spencer. Mr. Spen- 
cer, who was born in Rhode Island, lost his 
father in his childhood, and was but a small 
lad when he came with his mother to Litch- 
field County. He began very soon to earn 
his own living. Being very industrious and 
thrifty, he was able to save a part of his earn- 
ings, besides assisting his widowed mother 
somewhat. He succeeded to the farm left by 
his uncle, Samuel J. Whitford. , This is the 
estate now owned and occupied by Mr. Spen- 
cer's son Thomas. He lived to the good old 
age of seventy -two years, departing this life on 
the homestead. He had survived his wife, 
whose maiden name was Emeline Hill, and 
who died at the age of sixty-two years. She 
was a native of Blandford, Mass., and a daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Joanna (Kibbe) Hill, es- 
teemed residents of that town. Mr. and Mrs. 
Deming had five children, of whom three are 



now living; namely, John Allen, Clayton H., 
and Homer P. Frances A. died at the age of 
eleven years and Waldo when seventeen years 
old, being then a youth of great promise. 
The three living brothers are busily engaged 
in general agriculture and stock-raising, their 
favorite breed of cattle being- the Guernseys, 
and are meeting with merited prosperity in 
life. John A., born April 30, 1854, mar- 
ried Miss Alice Raidart; and they have three 
children: Grove W., Earl L., and Ralph S. 
Like his father, he takes an active interest in 
politics, and has already represented the dis- 
trict in the State legislature of 1886 and 1890. 
Clayton H., a member of the present (1895) 
legislature, was born January 20, 1866; and 
of his union with Almira R. Moore three 
sons have been born, Arthur, Harvey, and 
Lynn. Homer, the youngest son, born April 
7, 1870, is unmarried, and resides with his 
mother on the old homestead. Mrs. Deming 
is a member of the Baptist church, of which 
her husband was also a faithful member; and 
they have reared their family in the same 
faith, the two younger sons having united 
with the church. 



kOBERT J. MURPHY, a thriving 



^OB] 

I r\ farmer of the town of Washington, 
*- V^^ was born in County Antrim, Ire- 
land, in 1862, son of Robert and Nancy (Dun- 
lap) Murphy. Mr. Murphy's father was an 
industrious and highly respected farmer of . 
County Antrim, who died at the a-ge of thirty- 
five years. His wife, Nancy Dunlap, also a 
native of Ireland, became the mother of four 
children, namely: William, who married 
Margaret Nickle, and has four children; 
James; Robert J., the subject of this sketch; 
and Samuel. Mrs. Nancy D. Murphy is 
passing her declining years with her children, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



341 



and is a resident of Washington, this county. 
She has reached the age of seventy years. 

Robert J. Murphy emigrated to the United 
States in 1881 in company with his brother 
William, and settled in Washington, where 
he has since been prosperously engaged in 
farming. He comes of a race famed for their 
industry and natural aptitude for the cultiva- 
tion of the soil, and well maintains their best 
traditions. Mr. Murphy married Anna Lud- 
gate, daughter of John and Margaret (Hegert) 
Ludgate, of Bridgeport, Conn. Mrs. Murphy's 
father, who was a respected citizeuj was a 
stove finisher by trade, and died at the age of 
seventy-eight years. He and his wife reared 
the following children: Fanny, who became 
Mrs. Terrill, and has two children; Michael, 
who died aged forty-two years; Belle, who be- 
came Mrs. Dean, and has two children; Anna, 
who is now Mrs. Murphy; Jennie, who be- 
came Mrs. Cables, and has two children; and 
John. Mrs. Ludgate died when in her fifty- 
second year. Mr. Murphy is a Republican in 
politics. He is a member of Washington 
Grange, No. 1 1 ; and both he and his wife 
attend the Congregational church. 



-AMES T. .NORTON, an old and re- 
spected resident of Winsted, where, 
retired from active business, he has 
lived for the past twenty-nine years, was born 
in Goshen, Litchfield County, February 3, 
181 1. His father was Abraham and his 
grandfather Ebenezer Norton, both natives of 
Goshen. Ebenezer Norton was a farmer in 
good circumstances and also a skilful me- 
chanic. He reared four sons and three daugh- 
ters, all of whom grew up, married, and lived 
to a ripe old age. 

Abraham Norton was born about I774) and 
spent his life in Goshen, where he had a 



large and productive farm. On November 
27, 1794, he married Rhoda Thompson, of 
Goshen, who lived to be eighty-two years old, 
and now rests with her husband in the Central 
Cemetery at Goshen. Their farm-house was 
brightened by one daughter and five sons, of 
whom James T. Norton, now in his eighty- 
fifth year, is the only survivor. 

James T. Norton's boyhood and youth were 
spent on his father's farm. From the district 
school at Goshen he went to the academy, and 
he spent one term in Torringford. He de- 
sired a classical education, but was not so sit- 
uated as to secure his wish; and at seventeen 
he became a clerk in a country store. At the 
end of six months he obtained a position as 
collector for a clock firm, and went West in 
their employ, travelling for about a year. 
The six years following he was employed by 
Case & Wilson at Marion, Ala. ; and on their 
closing up business he engaged as collector 
for Dennis Perkins & Co., a large mercantile 
house in New York City. .In the interests of 
this firm he travelled extensively through the 
North-western States. In the summer, when 
not occupied in collecting, he was employed 
in keeping books. His connection with the 
house, beginning in 1853, lasted until 1865, 
when the firm wound up its business. Mr. 
Norton afterward spent two years in trade in 
Avon, Conn. When he retired, he had an 
ample fortune, the most of which he had ac- 
quired by his own industry. 

Mr. Norton was twice married. His first 
marriage, which took place in 1834, was with 
Adeline Wilson. She died at his present 
home on May 8, 1876, aged sixty-seven. In 
November, 1877, he took for his second wife 
Mrs. Emeline S. Williams, of New Haven, 
daughter of Grove Winchell, Jr., and Laura 
(Doolittle) Winchell. Her father was a 
farmer in the town of Chester, Hampden 



342 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



County, Mass., and died in the prime of life, 
having been fatally injured by a fall from a 
load of hay. His widow lived to be eighty- 
five years old, dying in 1882. Mrs. Norton is 
one of nine children. Her only brother and 
a sister have passed away. Six sisters are yet 
living. Her first husband, to whom she was 
married November 11, 1841, was Edward 
Williams, a mechanic, who died in 1865, 
leaving her wih two sons and two daughters. 
Her eldest daughter, Agnes W., is now Mrs. 
Carpenter, and lives in Brookline, Mass.; 
Alice E. is the wife of William P. Clancey, a 
Congregational minister in Troy, N.H.; 
Byron Hartley Williams lives in Amherst, 
Mass.; and Frank L. Williams died in 1876, 
at the age of nineteen. Mrs. Norton has six 
grand-daughters and two grandsons, the latter 
remarkably talented and distinguished for 
their scholarly acquirements. 

Mr. Norton was a Henry Clay Whig, and 
since the war has been nominally a Democrat; 
but he always votes for the best man. He has 
served as Selectman and filled other town 
offices: and with his wife he attends the Con- 
gregational church. A man of brilliant intel- 
lect and pleasing personality, he is a fine con- 
versationalist, expressing his thoughts in the 
best of language with the clearest enunciation. 
It is a pleasure to visit him and his estimable 
wife in their spacious home at 12 Park Place. 




|RS. EMMA J. (MARIGOLD) 
GREENLEAF, an enterprising 
manufacturer, engaged in wood- 
turning and enamelling at Pleasant Valley, 
this county, was born in Waterbury, Conn. 
Her father, the late William H. Marigold, 
was born in New York City, which was the 
lifelong home, so far as known, of his father, 
William Marigold. William H. Marigold 



learned the trade of a silversmith while living 
with his parents. When a young man, he re- 
moved to the manufacturing town of Water- 
bury, where he worked at his trade for the 
firm of Brown Brothers nineteen years. On 
account of ill health he was forced to resign 
his position, and sought the milder climate of 
Florida, hoping that it might prove beneficial 
to him. But he grew steadily worse, and 
died there in the month of July, 1869. The 
maiden name of his wife, mother of Mrs. 
Greenleaf, was Elizabeth Abbott. She was a 
native of Middlebury, Conn., being a daughter 
of David Abbott, wfm, it is thought, spent his 
entire life in that town. After the death of 
her husband she returned from Florida to her 
native State, and spent her last years in the 
city of Bridgeport, where she passed away, in 
February, 1883. Besides Mrs. Greenleaf she 
reared William H. Marigold, a prominent 
business man of Bridgeport, influential in 
the management of municipal affairs, having 
served as Mayor of the city two terms, and 
being at the present time State Senator. 

When sixteen years of age Emma J. Mari- 
gold became the bride of John C. Greenleaf, 
who was identified with the manufacturing in- 
terests of Litchfield County for many years. 
He was born in Chester, N.H., son of John 
and Frazilette (Lane) Greenleaf. (Further 
information will be found in the published 
Genealogy of the Greenleaf family.) Mr. 
Greenleaf was but an infant when his parents 
removed to Newburyport, Mass., where he 
grew to manhood and acquired his education. 
When about twenty years of age, he went to 
Florida, where he purchased a Spanish title to 
a tract of land, and commenced its improve- 
ment, thinking to devote it in due course to 
the culture of Florida fruit. The climate did 
not agree with him, however; and after a 
three years' trial he returned North, locating 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



343 



soon afterward in Waterbury, where he was 
employed for a time in a clock factory. Mr. 
Greenleaf next established himself in business 
at Wolcott, where he bought a small mill, 
and began the business of wood-turning. In 
a few years, the business outgrowing the ca- 
pacity of the plant, he sold out. After that 
he .was engaged in manufacturing at Burrville, 
Colebrook River, and at New Boston. He 
was in business at the latter place at the time 
of his decease, in October, i88g. 

After the death of her husband Mrs. Green- 
leaf, who is an energetic, capable woman, with 
a natural aptitude fof-" business, continued 
manufacturing in New Boston for a time. In 
1 89 1 she took a lease of the plant of the 
Greenwoods Manufacturing Company at Pleas- 
ant Valley, and, having fitted it with all the 
requisite machinery, has since carried on busi- 
ness there with remarkable success. She has 
six children; namely, Elizabeth, Eleanor, 
Edith, John, Willie, and Hattie. Elizabeth, 
the eldest child, married Clark Sherman; and 
they have two children, Raymond Greenleaf 
Sherman and Ralston Marigold Sherman. 
Mr. Greenleaf was for a number of years con- 
nected with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows; and Mrs. Greenleaf is an esteemed 
member of the Congregational church and a 
valued and active member of the Woman's 
Christian Temperance Union. 



(glYLFRED E. MERRELL, a well-to- 
ZJL\ farmer of New Hartford, residing in 
/JlsV^__ the village of Nepaug, son of Asher 
and Eliza (Olmstead) Merrell, was born Feb- 
ruary 10, 1830, upon the farm which he now 
owns and occupies. Mr. Merrell's grand- 
father, Asher Merrell, Sr., was an early set- 
tler in New Hartford, and owned a farm in 
Nepaug, which he cultivated for the greater 



part of his life. He and his wife, Caroline 
Phelps, of Harwinton, both lived to be over 
seventy years of age. They reared a family 
of seven children. 

Asher Merrell, the younger, was born and 
brought up on the old homestead in Nepaug, 
and early acquired a practical knowledge of 
farming. When of age, he purchased a farm 
in the neighborhood of his birthplace; and 
this he conducted with good results until his 
death, which occurred when he was seventy- 
four years old. He was a Democrat in poli- 
tics. His wife, Eliza Olmstead, who was a 
daughter of Michael Olmstead, a prosperous 
farmer and an old resident of New Hartford, 
became the mother of eight children, five of 
whom are living, namely: Walter S., a resi- 
dent of Southington; Alfred E. ; Ann M., 
who married Cyrus E. Ransom; Caroline A., 
who married Charles E. Green, of Newark, 
N.J. ; and Catherine J., wife of William S. 
Seymour. Mrs. Eliza Olmstead Merrell lived 
to reach the age of eighty-four. She was a 
member of the Congregational church. 

Alfred E. Merrell was educated in the com- 
mon schools of his native town, and at an 
early age began to help his father in carrying 
on the farm. He resided with his parents 
until he was twenty-four; and a few years 
later he purchased a portion of the old home 
farm, where he now resides. He owns one 
hundred acres of fertile land, and since set- 
tling here has erected substantial farm build- 
ings and otherwise improved the property. 
He conducts general farming, receiving satis- 
factory returns for his labor; and he is thrifty 
and energetic, possessing a high order of in- 
telligence and entertaining advanced ideas in 
relation to the best methods of farming. In 
politics he is a Democrat, but votes indepen- 
dently when he considers it for the best so to 
do. He has served as a member of the Board 



344 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of Selectmen for several years, and has acted 
as a Justice of the Peace. He is officially 
connected with the Grange, and takes an 
active interest in all matters relative to the 
general welfare of the community. 

In 1853 Mr. Merrell married Eliza Barnes, 
daughter and only child of Isaac and Thirza 
(Barber) Barnes, the former of whom moved 
from Southington to New Hartford, where he 
became a prosperous farmer. Mr. Barnes 
lived to reach the age of seventy-seven. His 
second wife, Thirza Barber, a native of Can- 
ton, attained the advanced age of eighty-six. 

Mr. and Mrs. Merrell have four children, 
as follows: Charles A., who married Loretta 
J. Mason, and has one son, named Alfred S. ; 
Ida H., who married Charles J. Healy, an em- 
ployee of the Consolidated Railroad Com- 
pany; Jessie E., a graduate of the Collinsville 
High School, who married Stephen L. Kel- 
logg, a travelling salesman; and Fannie K., 
who resides at home. At the Westfield, 
Mass., Normal School Jessie E. Merrell fitted 
herself for teaching, and taught successfully 
in her native town and in Massachusetts. Mr. 
Merrell is a member of the Congregational 
church, of which he has been Deacon for three 
years, and is a teacher in the Sunday-school. 
His wife and family are also members of the 
church and Sunday-school. 



'OHN M. FORD, who has served three 
terms as a member of the Connecticut 
legislature, is the enterprising owner 
of a productive farm in Marble Dale, in Wash- 
ington, Litchfield County, Conn., where he 
also conducts a large creamery. He is a son 
of Lewis and Anna (Farrand) Ford, and was 
born in this town on August 4, 1823. Mr. 
Ford's grandfather, Samuel Ford, moved from 
Milford, Conn., to Washington, where he set- 



tled upon a farm, and engaged in agricultural 
labors successfully for the rest of his life. 
He raised a family of ten children, five sons 
and five daughters. 

Lewis Ford was born in Milford, and in 
young manhood learned the carpenter's trade, 
which he followed as an occupation in connec- 
tion with farming. He owned a large farm 
situated on Christian Street, and was a pros- 
perous and useful citizen. He died at the age 
of forty-four years. His wife, Anna Farrand, 
who was a daughter of John Farrand, of 
Washington, lived to the age of sixty years. 
Their six children were as follows: Mary; 
Catherine, who became Mrs. Goodsell; Henry; 
George; Edgar; and John M., the subject of 
this sketch. Mr. Ford's parents attended the 
Congregational church. 

John M. Ford received his education in the 
schools of Washington; and in young man- 
hood he engaged in the marble business, 
which he followed for four years. He then 
turned his attention to agriculture, and has 
since devoted himself with energy and success 
to the management of his valuable farm in 
Marble Dale. Although he has passed his 
seventieth birthday, he is still in possession 
of youthful vigor and activity. In 1894 he 
established a large creamery upon his farm; 
and, gathering his cream from the surrounding 
country, he is now producing an average of 
two thousand seven hundred pounds of superior 
butter per week. He is a Republican in poli- 
tics; and, besides serving as a grand juror, he 
has been three times elected to represent his 
town in the State legislature, of which he was 
a member during the years 1873, 1877, and 
1878, his public life being marked by a cor- 
rect understanding of the necessary elements 
of good government, together with an intelli- 
gent conception of the best interests of his 
constituents. 




JOHN M. FORD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



347 



In 1849 ^^- Ford married Sophronia M. 
Wheaton, daughter of Myron B. Wheaton, of 
New Milford, Conn., and has one adopted 
daughter, Nellie C. Mrs.- Ford died in 1890, 
aged sixty-nine years. Mr. Ford occupies a 
prominent position among the leading farmers 
of his locality, and has enjoyed a prosperous 
career. He has always been quick to avail 
himself of new and progressive ideas in rela- 
tion to agricultural development, and has im- 
proved his farm to a high state of cultivation. 

This brief biographical sketch is accom- 
panied by a likeness of Mr. Ford. 



■Y^VrNURRAY C. FORD, a prosperous 
1 1 =i farmer of Washington, Litchfield 
^ '?LL? ^____, County, Conn., was born at the 
Ford homestead, in this town, December 26, 
1866, and is a son of Simeon D. Ford. Mr. 
Ford's great-grandfather, Samuel Ford (son of 
John, son of John, son of Thomas, the settler 
of Milford), moved from Milford to Washing- 
ton, where he resided for the rest of his life. 
He married Susanna Stone (daughter of John, 
son of Ezekiel, son of John, son of John, the 
settler'of Guilford), and they reared a family 
of ten children, namely: Susanna; Samuel, 
Jr.; William; Polly; Lazarus; Sally; Lewis; 
Lois; John M.; and Simeon. 

John M. Ford, Mr. Ford's grandfather, was 
born in Washington shortly after his parents 
removed from Milford. He. became a prosper- 
ous farmer and a worthy citizen, and died in 
1843, aged fifty-eight years. He married 
Polly Calhoun, daughter of Calvin Calhoun 
(son of John, son of David), of Washington, 
and reared a family of six children, as fol- 
lows: Seth Porter, who married first Maria 
Fowler, second Carrie Jackson, and had three 
children — Lois, Minnie, and Seth; Simeon 
D. ; John C, who died at the age of sixty- 



six; Lois A., who became Mrs. Robert Har- 
vey, and had four children — Charles, Calvin, 
George, and Remus ; Samuel R. ; and Remus 
T., who married Helen Sackett. Mrs. Polly 
Calhoun Ford died in 1864, aged sixty- 
eight. 

Simeon D. Ford, Mr. Ford's father, was 
born at the homestead in Washington, January 
8, 1822. He was early trained to agricult- 
ural labors, and for many years followed 
farming with good results. He has now re- 
tired from active pursuits, and is passing his 
declining years pleasantly with his son. His 
wife, Malinda Sackett, whom he married in 
1849, was a daughter of Moses Sackett, of 
Warren, Conn, (son of Benjamin, son of 
Justus, son of Jonathan, son of William, son 
of John, son of Simeon). Mr. and Mrs. 
Simeon D. Ford were the parents of four chil- 
dren, as follows : Porter, who married Lois 
Ford, and has one daughter, named Lois; 
Lester, who died at the age of twenty-five; 
Archer;' and Murray C, the subject of this 
sketch. The mother died in 1881, aged fifty- 
five. Simeon D. Ford is a highly esteemed 
citizen of Washington, and is a charter mem- 
ber of the Grange in this town. 

Murray C. Ford received his education in 
the public schools of his native town, and has 
always resided at the Ford homestead. In 
his boyhood and youth he assisted his father 
in the work of the farm, and he now has entire 
charge of the property. He carries on farm- 
ing in a progressive and energetic manner, 
and his industry and thrift are the assurance 
of a prosperous and successful future. In 
1 89 1 Mr. Ford was united in marriage with 
Ivah Kelly, daughter of Luther and Gertrude 
(Ailing) Kelly, of Ansonia, Conn. Mrs. 
Ford's father died at the age of twenty- 
six, and her mother died aged thirty-seven 
years. 



348 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



bfRANK O. PECK, a prosperous farmer 
P^5 and a prominent resident of Water- 
town, was born December i, 1853, son 
of Leman O. and Rhoda A. (Carr) Peck. 
Mr. Peck's grandfather, Ozias Peck, settled 
in Watertown, where he was successfully en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits until his death. 
Leman O. Peck, Mr. Peck's father, who 
was an only son, was born in Watertown. 
His father died when he was but a year old; 
and he passed his boyhood and youth upon a 
farm, contributing what he could to his own 
support by his labor. In early manhood he 
bought a tract of land situated north of Water- 
town Centre, where he engaged in farming 
upon his own account. He followed his call- 
ing industriously, and was a useful citizen. 
He died at the age of seventy years. His 
wife was a native of Goshen, Conn., daughter 
of Leonard B. Carr, a progressive farmer of 
that town. She became the mother of four 
children, as follows: Emma -A., who married 
Frank S. Munson; Fanny K., who married 
Burton G. Bryan, a banker of Waterbury, 
Conn.; Frank O., the subject of this sketch; 
and Mary C, who married for her first hus- 
band Pierre W. Judson and for her second 
Ploward J. Wright. The mother died in 
Watertown, aged sixty-five years. Mr. Peck's 
parents were members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, of which his father was a 
Trustee and collector. 

Frank O. Peck received his education in 
the district and high schools of his native 
town, and resided at home, assisting in carry- 
ing on the farm until he became of age. He 
then purchased a farm, situated two miles and 
a half from the village; and, after residing 
there for a time, he sold the place, and bought 
the old homestead where his father was born. 
He cultivated that property successfully until 
1889, when he again sold; and, moving to his 



present farm of sixty acres, he has since de- 
voted his energies to general farming and 
dairying, with good results. He keeps twenty 
cows, furnishing milk to the local dealers; 
and his crops are among the best raised in his 
locality. He is Republican in politics, is 
actively interested in local public affairs, has 
served three years as a member of the Board 
of Selectmen, two years as an Assessor; and 
he has been a Constable for eighteen years. 

In 1874 Mr. Peck was married to Celia S. 
Judson, daughter of Thomas F. and Ann (Mil- 
lard) Judson. Thomas F. Judson was a na- 
tive of Woodbury, Conn., who settled in 
Watertown, and formerly owned the farm 
where Mr. Peck now resides. He moved to 
Illinois, and later to Texas, where he was a 
successful sheep dealer. He passed the last 
years of his life in Watertown, and died at 
the age of si,;cty-one years. His wife was a 
daughter of Charles Millard, of Woodbury, 
who died in that town at the age of ninety-one 
years. She became the mother of seven chil- 
dren, two of whom are still living, namely: 
Celia S., who is now Mrs. Peck; and Eliza, 
who married James G. Skilton. Mrs. Peck's 
mother still survives at the age of sixty-four 
years. Mr. andJMrs. Peck had two children, 
one of whom, Frederick, is living. They 
have an adopted daughter, named Rosalind. 
Mr. Peck is connected with the Patrons of 
Husbandry, being a charter member of the 
Grange in Watertown. Both he and his wife 
attend the Methodist Episcopal church, of 
which Mrs. Peck is a member. 



C. NEWBURY, a well-to-do-farmer 
of Litchfield and a veteran of the 
Civil War, was born in Litchfield, 
Conn., November 29, 1840, son of Joseph A. 
and Paulina (Willcox) Newbury. Mr. New- 




BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



349 



bury's father was a native of New York State. 
During his boyhood he came to Connecticut, 
where he found employment at farm work, 
and in his spare time attended the district 
schools. After reaching manhood, he pur- 
chased a farm, which was located near the 
present farm of his son in Litchfield, and 
became a thriving agriculturist. He was 
prominent in public affairs, and served as Se- 
lectman, both in Litchfield and Torrington. 
He died at the age of seventy years. His 
wife, Paulina Willcox, was born in the vicin- 
ity of Litchfield, and was a daughter of Abia- 
tha Willcox, a prosperous farmer of this lo- 
cality. She was the mother of seven children 
of whom but two are now living, namely: 
C. C. Newbury, the subject of this sketch, 
and Eva, widow of Warner Scoville. Mrs. 
Joseph A. Newbury still survives at the age 
of seventy-eight years. 

C. C. Newbury resided in Harwinton during 
his early years. At the commencement of the 
Civil War he enlisted as a private in Com- 
pany I, Thirteenth Regiment, Connecticut 
Voiunteers, and served four years, during 
which time he saw some hard fighting; but, 
although promotion was offered him, he de- 
clined, preferring to remain in the ranks. 
After being mustered out, he returned to 
Litchfield, and purchased his present farm of 
one hundred acres, which he devotes to dairy- 
ing interests. He also deals to some extent 
in cattle. He is a Democrat in politics, and 
has served as Selectman and Assessor. In 
1868 Mr. Newbury was united in marriage to 
Emma Gilbert, who was born in Litchfield, 
and is a daughter of George Gilbert, a pros- 
perous farmer of this town. Mr. and Mrs. 
Newbury have "had four children, namely: 
Howard, who is married, and has one son, 
Joseph E. ; Edgar; Alice M. ; and Jessie, 
who died at the age of four .years. 



Mr. Newbury is liberal in his religious 
views, and his wife is a member of the Epis- 
copal church. 



- < ■*•*■>■■■ 




RANK FARRAND, whose valuable 
dairy farm is situated in the town of 
Washington, was born on September 
22, 1864, on the homestead where he now 
resides. His parents were David N. and 
Sophia B. (Farrand) Farrand. Mr. Farrand's 
paternal grandfather, who was an industrious 
and thriving farmer of Washington, married ' 
Narcissa Gibson, and reared a family of three 
children, as follows : Rebecca, who became 
Mfs. Warner; Narcissa, who became Mrs. 
Atwood; and David N. 

David N. Farrand was born at the home- 
stead in Washington, and here grew to man- 
hood. Succeeding to the ownership of the 
property after the death of his father, he fol- 
lowed agricultural pursuits during his active 
period, and was known as a prosperous farmer 
and a useful citizen. He died at the age of 
sixty-six. His wife, Sophia B. Farrand, who 
was a daughter of Charles Farrand, of Wash- 
ington, became the mother of six children, as 
follows: Charles; Robbins, who married Delia 
Logan, and has one daughter, named Marjorie; 
Burdette; William H., who married Florence 
Paul, and has two children, Paul and Helen; 
Roderick M. ; and Frank, the subject of this 
sketch. The mother lived to reach the age of 
sixty-three. 

Frank Farrand received his education in 
the public schools, and was reared to farm life 
and healthful labors. He resided with his 
parents, assisting in carrying on the farm, and 
came into possession of the homestead at his 
father's death. His property, which is finely 
located, is well improved; and he cultivates 
the land and manages his various affairs with 
gratifying results. He is especially inter- 



35° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ested in dairying, and in this direction dis- 
plays a great amount of energy and ability. 
He is a Republican in politics, and in his re- 
ligious belief is a Congregationalist. 



"T^VTVARSHALL STRAIGHT, whose 
W= I =/ portrait accompanies the present 
i4 aLL' ^__^ sketch, is a retired farmer and a 
highly respected citizen of New Milford, 
Litchfield County, Conn. He was born in 
the adjacent town of Kent on April 22, 18 16, 
son of Henry A. and Abigail (Sherwood) 
Straight. Mr. Straight's paternal grand- 
father, Henry Straight, who resided in Kent, 
and was a farmer by occupation, was twice 
married. His first wife, Mary Straight, died 
in 1777, aged twenty-nine; and his second 
wife, Olive, died in 181 1, aged sixty-one 
years. Henry Straight died in 18 18, aged 
seventy-five, having reared but one child, 
Henry A., Mr. Straight's father. 

Henry A. Straight was born 'in Kent, and 
was reared to agricultural life. He succeeded 
to the ownership of the homestead, and hence- 
forth devoted his entire attention to agricult- 
ure, purchasing more land, which he added 
to his estate until he owned over five hundred 
acres. An able, energetic, and progressive 
farmer and a useful citizen, he lived to reach 
the age of eighty-four years. He was a Re- 
publican in politics and a Quaker in religion. 
His wife, Abigail Sherwood, who was a 
daughter of Reuben Sherwood, became the 
mother of four children, as follows: Marshall, 
the subject of this sketch; Olive, who married 
William Hoag; Henry, who died in 1887, 
aged sixty-three; and John, who died August 
22, 1893, aged nearly sixty-two. Mrs. Abi- 
gail S. Straight lived to reach the age of 
eighty-four years. 



Marshall Straight received his educat 



ion in 



the best schools of the vicinity, and at an 
early age became proficient in all branches of 
agriculture. He resided at home, assisting 
in the farm duties until reaching the age of 
twenty-two, when he settled upon a farm 
whiwh his father bought for him. This place 
he improved by the erection of a new house and 
barn ; and for many years he conducted general 
farming with good results, making a specialty 
of dairying interests, keeping a fine herd of 
Durham stock. In 1875 he rented the old farm, 
and purchasing another of thirty acres, upon 
which he now resides, conducted it success- 
fully until his retirement from active labor. 

In 1838 Mr. Straight was united in mar- 
riage to his first wife, whose maiden name 
was Mary Buckingham. She died in 1862, 
leaving four children, as follows: Alice, who 
was born August 13, 1840, married Mr. 
Wickwire, and is now deceased; Henry Carr, 
born November 18, 1841, and killed in the 
Civil War at the battle of Cold Harbor; 
Frederick G., born August 18, 1846, who 
married Emma Beach, and has two children, 
Frank B. and Frederick M. ; and Orrin, born 
in February, 1850, who is no longer living. 
Having been bereft by death of his .second 
wife, Asenath Wilbur, his third wife, Hannah 
Wilbur, and his fourth wife, Sophia Terrell, 
Mr. Straight married his present wife, whose 
maiden name was Josephine S. Wakelee. 

Mr. Straight is a Republican in politics, 
and has served with ability as Assessor and in 
other town offices. He has long occupied a 
position of prominence in the community, and 
has led a busy and a useful life. 



(sTtlbe: 



LBERT SYLVESTER HILL, a lead- 
ig business man of New Milford, 
was born on Long Mountain, in 
that township, July i, 1821, son of Noah I. 




MARSHALL STRAIGHT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



353 



and Aurila (Stilson) Hill. His great-grand- 
father, Silas Hill, who was born in 1733, 
moved from Sherborn or Holliston to New 
Fairfield, where he was married, and later set- 
tled in New Milford. In 1756 he enlisted 
for service in the French and Indian War, re- 
maining in the army one year. In 1760 he 
purchased land on the plains in New Milford, 
where Charles Hatch- now lives, and there 
made his home during the rest of his life, 
dying in 1798, at the age of sixty-six years. 
He married Sarah Leach, of New Fairfield, 
who died in 1792, in her fifty-seventh "year. 
Ten children were born to them; namely, 
Solomon, Sarah, Silas, Keziah, Polly, 
Johanna, Perthena, Ebenezer, Mercy, and 
Aurila. The eldest son, Solomon, who was 
the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, 
was born in 1759. He settled in the 
Aspetuck District, Fairfield County, purchas- 
ing a large farm, and for many years was suc- 
cessfully engaged in agricultural pursuits. In 
religious belief he was an Episcopalian, and 
was Vestryman of St. John's Church, to which 
he left a legacy of five hundred dollars. He 
died in 1839, at the age of eighty. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Amy Stone, died in 
1836, in her seventy-fourth year. They 
reared seven children; namely, Solomon, Noah 
I., Sally, Silas, Joyce, Gardner, and Amy M. 
Noah I. Hill, the father of Albert Sylves- 
ter, was born in New Milford, December 16. 
1785. He was a farmer and a cattle drover, 
owning considerable property on Long Moun- 
tain, and was very successful in his business 
projects. He died about the year 1820, while 
on a trip to Delaware. His wife was a daugh- 
ter of Rivees Stilson, of New Milford. She 
died in 1862, at the age of seventy-nine. 
Four sons were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hill; 
namely, Solomon B., Silas H., Noah, and 
Albert Sylvester. 



Albert Sylvester Hill received his early 
education in the district schools of New IVTil- 
ford, completing his studies at Amenia Semi- 
nary. As a first business venture he 
purchased a farm near Northville, New Mil- 
ford, and in company with E. P. Barton bought 
the Taylor Mill, fitted it for a paper-mill, and 
started it in 1852. After conducting this 
enterprise successfully for twenty years, Mr. 
Hill in 1872 purchased his partner's interest, 
[n 1888 he converted the establishment into a 
creamery, the first in the county, which he 
conducted successfully for two years. He 
then went to Roxbury, where he ran a mill 
for nineteen months. After this he returned 
to- New Milford, and retired from active busi- 
ness. Thfe creamery was destroyed by fire in 
1895. Mr. Hill now lives quietly on a small 
farm in Northville. He owns considerable 
other property in the town, and ranks among 
"the foremost men of the place. 

On November 16, 1845, he was married to 
Elizabeth S. Wells, born October 23, 1826, 
daughter of Philip and Nancy (Watson) 
Wells. Their children were: Agnes E., 
born August 3,' 1847, who married Jarvis E. 
Wheaton, of Washington, Conn., and has^one 
child; Horace A., born October 3, 1849, who 
married Florence B. Morehous, has one child, 
Daisy T., and lives at Bridgewater; and 
George W., a farmer in New Milford, born 
July 4, 1854, who married Abbie M. Couch, 
and has one child, Albert S. Mr. Hill votes 
the Democratic ticket. He represented the 
district in the legislature in 1867, 1868, 
1869, and 1 88 1, was First Selectman of the 
town eleven years, served on the School Com- 
mittee for some time, and has filled many 
other offices within the gift of his townsmen. 
In religious belief he is an Episcopalian, and 
has served as Warden of St. John's Church 
for thirty-six years. Mr. and Mrs. Hill were 



354 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the first couple married in that church. At 
the celebration of their golden wedding, No- 
vember i6, 1895, they received many beauti- 
ful presents from members of the parish, 
accompanied by expressions of regard that 
made the occasion one long to be remembered. 



'ONATHAN B. BALCH, an enterpris- 
ing citizen of Harwinton, who is 
widely and favorably known as a 
builder, a carriage manufacturer, and a first- 
class undertaker, was born in the village of 
Harwinton, October 26, 1822, son of Jonathan 
and Minerva (Brace) Balch. His father was 
a native of West Hartford and his mother of 
Harwinton. Our subject is the third Jonathan 
Balch in line of descent, his grandfather hav- 
ing also borne that name. Jonathan Balch, 
first, was born in West Hartford, and there 
passed his life, engaged in farming. He was 
a Deacon of the West Hartford church for 
many years. His son, father of our subject, 
was also a farmer, and spent some years in 
Harwinton when a young man. After his 
marriage, which took place early in the pres- 
ent century, he returned to his native town, 
and in 1820 moved again to Harwinton, pur- 
chasing the farm on which his wife was 
born. There he spent the rest of his life, 
dying at the age of seventy-eight. His wife, 
Minerva Brace, was the daughter of Esquire 
Brace, the leading man of the locality, a Trial 
Justice, and for many years a Justice of the 
Peace. He died in Harwinton in 1823. His 
daughter, Mrs. Balch, lived to attain the age. 
of seventy-three years. The home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Balch was brightened by six children, 
four of whom reached maturity. Of these two 
are now living, James S. and Jonathan B. 
One son met with a tragic death, being killed 
on the railroad. 



Jonathan B. Balch left home at the age of 
fifteen to learn the builder's trade, at which 
he worked, after completing his apprentice- 
ship, for about thirty-five years. Many of the 
houses in Harwinton and this vicinity were 
erected by Mr. Balch, among them his own 
home, which, though built in 1846, is as 
firm and well-conditioned to-day as when first 
completed. Mr. Balch subsequently built a 
carriage shop, and for years has been success- 
fully engaged in the manufacture and repair- 
ing of carriages; and in addition to his other 
business he has for twenty-five years been 
manager of a first-class undertaking establish- 
ment, personally answering calls from Litch- 
field, Plymouth, and other large places, 
besides attending to those in his native 
town. 

Mr. Balch has been twice married. In 
1843 he was united to Harriet N. Gibbs, a 
native of this county and daughter of Alaric 
Gibbs, a well-known farmer. She was called 
to rest in 1852. Our subject married for his 
second wife Charlotte Warner, daughter of 
Isaac Warner, a manufacturer of Middletown. 
She reared the following children: Charles 
W., an expert stenographer in New York City, 
who married Arabella Wickstead, of that city, 
and has two children, Howard and Clarence; 
George H., an engraver in Waterbury, who 
married Nettie Cook, and has seven children; 
Walter, a market owner in Harwinton, resid- 
ing next door to his father, who married 
Nellie Fisher, and has three children — Maud 
and Mabel, twins, and Walter; and Carrie, 
who married Dennis Baker, of Waterbury, and 
has one child, Addie. Mrs. Baker resides 
with her father. Mrs. Charlotte W. Balch 
died April 15, 1895. 

Politically, Mr. Balch favors the Repub- 
lican party. He takes an active interest in 
town affairs, and has served as Justice of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



355 



Peace at different times. With his children 
he attends the Congregational church, of 
which his wife was a member, and of which he 
was Treasurer many years. Mr. Balch is a 
man of unusual intelligence, and is a fine 
workman, believing in the motto, "What is 
worth doing at all is worth doing well." He 
is one of the oldest residents of Harwinton, 
and his life record entitles him to the respect 
which is universally accorded him. 




'AMUEL CLAYTON KINGMAN, 
a highly esteemed resident of 
Washington, this county, was born 
in South Reading, Mass., May 15, 1830, son 
of Samuel and Sarah R. (Pope) Kingman. 
His first ancestor in America was John King- 
man, who settled in Massachusetts; and his 
son, John Kingman, Mr. Kingman's grand- 
father, was born in that State. John Kipg- 
man, second, reared a family of six children; 
namely, George W., Abner, Hannah, Samuel, 
Warren, and Sybil. Samuel Kingman was 
born in Hingham, Mass. He learned the 
tailor's trade, which he followed for many 
years. He subsequently settled in South 
Reading, Mass., and for the last twenty years 
of his life was Postmaster of that town. 
He was a Democrat in politics, and repre- 
sented his district in the General Court of 
Massachusetts for two terms. Aside -from his 
political prominence, he was a progressive and 
useful citizen. He died at the age of seventy- 
eight years. His wife, Sarah R. Pope, who 
was a daughter of Jesse Pope, of South Read- 
ing, became the mother of eight children, as 
follows: Abner A., who married Sarah King- 
man; Samuel C, whose name heads this 
sketch; William W. ; Charles E., who mar- 
ried Martha Woodruff; Lucy E. ; Orlando P., 
who married Eunice L. Lyman; Arthur H.; 



and Evelyn, who is now Mrs. Sweetser. Mrs. 
Samuel Kingman was a lady of more than or- „ 
dinary intelligence, and was especially famil- 
iar with the Scriptures. In 18 18, when a girl • 
of ten years, she was awarded a prize for 
being able to recite from memory the greatest 
number of verses. She lived to reach the age 
of eighty-two, dying in 1890. 

Samuel C. Kingman, our subject, married 
Emily Eustice Brooks, of Kingfield, Me. 
They are the parents of five children ; Ella 
P., wife of Horace L. Eames; Mary H., Mrs. 
F. S. Buckingham; Carrie E., Mrs. H. B. 
Loomis; Katie B., Mrs. E. S. Buckingham; 
and Evely C, who resides at home. 



ISAAC C. CROFUT, who owns and con- 
ducts a productive farm in Washington,, 
this county, was born in New Milford, 
Conn., November 8, 18 18, son of Josiah and 
Anna (Northrop) Crofut. Mr. Crofut's father 
was a native of Danbury, Conn., and a farmer 
by occupation. He was for some time a resi- 
dent of New Milford,- but subsequently settled 
in Kent, where for forty years he successfully 
carried on farming. His death took place 
when he was sixty-nine years old. His wife, 
Anna Northrop, became the mother of ten 
children, namely: George, who married Anna 
Morehouse, and died, leaving five children; 
Annis, who became Mrs. Flower, and had 
three children; Israel, who married Lunna 
Gunn; Clara; Be'tsey, who became Mrs. 
Huntley; Isaac C, the subject of this sketch; 
Chloe, who became Mrs. Cone, and had three 
children; Harriet; Charlotte, who became 
Mrs. Lane; and Elizabeth, who became Mrs. 
Wedge, and had two children. The mother, 
Mrs. Anna N. Crofut, died at the age of 
eighty-five years. 

Isaac C. Crofut removed with his parents 



3S6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



from New Milford to Kent when quite young, 
and received his education in the district 
schools. In early manhood he learned the 
mason's trade, an occupation which he fol- 
lowed steadily for forty-six years, and was 
widely and favorably known as a skilled and 
reliable workman. He settled upon his pres- 
ent farm in Washington in 1843, and has en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits with satisfactory 
results. His life has been a busy and pros- 
perous one, and to his industry and fore- 
thought may be ascribed in a large measure 
his success. 

In 1843 Mr. Crofut was united in marriage 
to Sally Carpenter; and they reared one 
daughter, Ellen, who became the wife of the 
Rev. Mr. Judd, a Methodist minister of Long 
Island. Mrs. Crofut died January 26, 1891, 
aged seventy-one years. Mr. Crofut is inde- 
pendent in politics and a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 



pAMES G. WELTON, a retired farmer 
and prominent resident of Bridge- 
water, Conn., was born in this town, 
January 21, 1822, son of Horatio N. and 
Anna A. (Treat) Welton. Mr. Welton is a 
direct descendant of John and Mary (Upton) 
Welton, who were the first ancestors of the 
family in America. They emigrated from 
England in 1667, and in 1669 located in 
Waterbury, Conn., where they were among 
the first settlers. 

The descent continues through their son, 
George Welton, whose son Peter was Mr. 
Welton's great-grandfather. Peter's son, 
George Welton, Mr. Welton's grandfather, 
who was born in Waterbury, served as a pri- 
vate in the Revolutionary War, and after retir- 
ing from the service settled in Bridgewater. 
He was a nail-maker by trade, an occupation 



which he followed with success; and he also 
did a profitable business in general black- 
smithing and the making of points for the old- 
fashioned ploughs used in those early days. 
He bought a house lot at the Four Corners, in 
the vicinity of Mr. Welton's present residence; 
and he continued to add to his real estate 
until he possessed a valuable farm. Grand- 
father Welton was a prominent man of the 
town and an active member of the Congrega- 
tional church. In 1789 he married Elizabeth 
Botsford, and had seven children, as follows: 
Thirza, who married Stephen Treat; a son 
who died in infancy; Minerva, who married 
Curtis Warner; Harriet, who married David 
Young; Horatio; George S., who married 
Louisa Magraw; and Eliza, who died young. 
George Welton died November 12, 1837, aged 
seventy-six years. His wife, Elizabeth, died 
at the age of sixty-two years. 

Horatio N. Welton, Mr. Welton's father, 
was born at the Four Corners, in Bridgewater, 
October 21, 1798. He adopted agriculture as 
an occupation, and settled upon a farm situ- 
ated in the lower or southerly part of the town 
of Bridgewater. He was a thrifty and suc- 
cessful farmer and a worthy citizen. He died 
at the age of seventy years. In politics he 
was originally a Whig, but later joined the 
Republican party, and held various town 
offices, being a member of the School Com- 
mittee for several years. His wife, Anna A. 
Treat, whom he married November 20, 1820, 
was a daughter of John H. Treat. They 
reared three children, as follows: James G., 
the subject of this sketch; Walter B., who 
married Jane Foot; and Eli H., who married 
Laura Jessup. The mother lived to 'reach the 
age of sixty-eight years. 

James G. Welton was educated in the 
schools of his native town, and at home early 
began to take lessons in practical farming. 




JAMES G. WELTON. 



BiOGRAPHiCAL REVlfiW 



359 



At the age of twenty-two he bought the 
Charles French farm of eighty-eight acres, 
which he managed for m i:y years with profit- 
able results. He remodelled the buildings, 
improved the land, and by persistent labor 
succeeded in making his farm a productive and 
valuable piece of property. Besides devoting 
considerable attention to running a dairy, he 
was for some years engaged in butchering and 
heavy teaming. He has now rented his farm 
and retired from active labor, feeling that he 
has earned a rest. In politics Mr. Welton 
has always acted with the Republican party. 
He has served with ability many years as 
School Committee, and as Assessor for sixteen 
years, at the expiration of his last term declin- 
ing to remain longer in office, feeling that he 
has done his part in the public service. 

Mr. Welton and Eliza Castle, daughter of 
Harvey H. and Lucinda (Young) Castle, were 
united in marriage on December 25, 1844, 
and became the parents of three children, as 
follows: George H., who died at the age of 
ten months; Julia E., who married Lester A. 
Worden, a broker of Syracuse, N.Y., and has 
four children, namely — G. Welton, Ruth W., 
Jessie, and Frank B. ; and Annie L., who 
married Phineas E. Clark, a prosperous farmer 
of New Milford, and has two children, namely 
— Sidney V. and Irving W. Mrs. Welton 
died in January, 1892, aged seventy-two years. 

A portrait of Mr. Welton is here given. 



iDSON B. LOCKWOOD, a farmer and 
the First Selectman of Watertown, was 
born in this town, September 23, 
1855, son of Ezra and Julia E. (Beecher) 
Lockwood. Mr. Lockwood's grandfather, 
Ezra Lockwood, was a native of Stamford, 
Conn., and a farmer by occupation. He set- 
tled in Watertown, where he engaged in farm- 



ing, became a large land-owner, and resided 
until his death, which took place when he was 
fifty-three years old. He was a prominent 
and influential man in the town, and served as 
a Selectman for several years. 

Ezra Lockwood, Jr., Mr. Lockwood's father, 
was born in Watertown in 1803. He was 
reared to farm life, and resided with his par- 
ents until he reached the age of twenty-one, 
when he bought the farm which is now owned 
and conducted by his sons. He followed agri- 
cultural pursuits with energy and success, 
making various improvements, thereby greatly 
enhancing the value of his property. He died 
in the prime of life, aged forty-eight years. 
His wife, Julia E. Beecher, was a daughter of 
Hezekiah Beecher. The latter was a native 
and lifelong resident of Prospect, and died 
there at the age of sixty-three years. He 
married Temperance Bronson, who was born 
in Waterbury, Conn., and reared ten children, 
three of whom are still living, namely: Har- 
riet, who became Mrs. Bristol ; Abigal, who 
became Mrs. Gaylord; and Julia E., who mar- 
ried Ezra Lockwood. The mother lived to 
the age of eighty-seven. Mrs. Ezra Lock- 
wood has reared a family of six children; and 
of these there are three survivors: Ella M., 
Edson B., and Charles E. The mother, who 
has reached the age of seventy-one years, re- 
sides at the homestead with her son, and is a 
member of the Episcopal church. Her hus- 
band was a member of the same church, and 
served as a Vestryman for many years. 

Edson B. Lockwood, having commenced his 
education in the common schools, completed it 
at the academy. When his father died, his 
mother was left with four children, the eldest 
of whom was but eight years old ; and he was 
necessarily thrown upon his own resources at 
an early age. He acquired by experience and 
hard work a thorough knowledge of agricult- 



360 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ure, and in company with lais brother has 
managed the farm with success. The prop- 
erty, finely located, contains one hundred and 
sixty acres of improved land. It is devoted 
principally to dairying purposes, and is con- 
ducted upon a liberal and progressive scale. 
Mr. Lockwood for some years has acted as 
local agent for several concerns engaged in 
the manufacture and sale of agricultural im- 
plements. In politics he is a Republican, and 
his ability and aptitude for the public service 
have placed him in a prominent position in 
local affairs. He has been a member of the 
Board of Selectmen for seven years, and for 
the past three years has presided over the de- 
liberations of that body. He is connected 
with the Patrons of Husbandry, and is at the 
present time Treasurer of the Watertown 
Grange. 

Charles E. Lockwood, who is jointly inter- 
ested in managing the farm, is a capable and 
progressive farmer, to whose ability and good 
judgment is due a fair share of the success at- 
tained by the Lockwood brothers. He is per- 
severing, and is highly esteemed for this and 
many other commendable qualities. In poli- 
tics he supports the Republican party. He 
has served with ability as a grand juror, and 
he is connected with the Masonic fraternity. 
He married Ruth Atwood, and has two chil- 
dren; namely, Julia M. and Bronson E. 

The Lockwood homestead has been in the 
possession of the family for over one hundred 
years, and the present residence was built by 
the grandfather over ninety-five years ago. 
They have for many years been identified with 
the Episcopal church in Watertown, of which 
Edson B. Lockwood was a Vestryman. Mrs. 
Charles E. Lockwood is widely known and es- 
teemed for her many womanly characteristics. 
Her sprightly and intelligent children have a 
promising future before them. 




L. PEABODY, the genial proprietor 
of the Wononsco House at Lakeville, 
was born in Levant, Me., on Febru- 
ary 28, 1863, son of William B. and Julia 
(Bachelder) Peabody. 

The history of the Peabody family in Amer- 
ica begins a few years after the landing of 
the Pilgrims on the shores of New England. 
Lieutenant Francis Peabody was born in St. 
Alban's, Hertfordshire, England, in the year 
1614. He was one of the passengers in the 
ship "Planter," Nicholas Travis Master, when 
that vessel made its voyage to New England 
in 1635, 3-S shown by the enrolment of his 
name in the Augmentation Office in Rolls 
Court, Westminster Hall, London. For three 
years he lived in Ipswich, Mass. ; and then, 
in 1638, he settled in Hampton, old Norfolk 
County, where for about twelve years he was 
engaged with the Rev. S. Bachelder and 
others in their work. In 1651 he removed to 
Topsfield, Mass., purchased a farm, and be- 
came" one of the most enterprising and promi- 
nent men of that town. He took the freeman's 
oath in 1648, and the following year he was 
chosen by the town of Hampton with two 
others to "end all small causes" when the 
State lines were surveyed. He lived to a 
good age. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Mary Foster, died in 1705. They were 
the parents of fourteen children. Of these 
Sarah married a Mr. Howe; Hepsibah be- 
came the wife of a Mr. Rea; Lydia, the wife 
of J. Perley; and Mary married Samuel J. 
Dearth. The others were: John, Joseph, 
William, Isaac, Ruth, Damaris, Samuel, 
Jacob, Hannah, and Nathaniel. 

William Peabody, who was born in 1646, 
established his home in Boxford, Mass. He 
married Miss Hannah Hale, who was born in 
Newbury, Mass., in 1648. Four sons and 
three daughters were born of their union, as 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



361 



follows: Stephen; Mary, who married J. 
Simonds; Ephraim; Hannah, who married J. 
Foster; John; Abiah, who became the wife of 
J. Kimball; and Oliver. Their father died 
in 1699 and their mother in 1733. Stephen, 
the eldest child, was born in 1685. Like his 
father, he spent his life in the town of Box- 
ford, where he died in 1759. He married 
Miss Hannah Swan; and the fruit of their 
union was nine children, namely: Hannah, 
who married J. Smith; Richard; Mary; 
William, who married Rebecca Smith; Hep- 
sibah, who became the wife of E. Dorman; 
Priscilla, who married J. Hale; Francis; 
Stephen; and Richard. Their mother died 
in 1764, seventy-five years of age. 

Richard Peabody, the great-great-grand- 
father of E. L. Peabody, was born in 1731. 
He was successfully engaged in farming in 
Boxford. During the Revolutionary War he 
was most zealous in the cause of freedom and 
independence, and was Captain of a company 
at Ticonderoga and Lake George. Not con- 
tent with what he could do personally, he sent 
his sons into the army as soon as they were 
old enough to render service. His death oc- 
curred June 7, 1820, in the eighty-ninth year 
of his age. He married Miss Jemima Spof- 
ford, of Rowley, who bore him eleven chil- 
dren, eight of whom were sons. They were: 
Hannah; Hepsibah; Stephen, who married 
Miss Ann Killum ; J©hn, who joined the army 
when but thirteen years old, and was married 
in 1788 to Miss Molly Taylor; Richard, who 
married Miss Dolly Kimball; Oliver, who 
married Miss Peggy Stickney; William; Pris- 
cilla, who became the wife of T. Townsend; 
Francis, who married Miss Fanny Stickney; 
Samuel, who married Miss Abigail Wood in 
181 3; and Joseph, who married Miss Hannah 
Foster. Their mother died December 19, 
181 1, seventy-eight years of age. 



William Peabody, born in 1768, studied 
medicine, and became a successful physician 
of Corinth, Me. He married Miss Sally 
Bean ; and they reared a son and three daugh- 
ters: Sally, Hannah, Nancy, and Lorenzo J. 
Lorenzo J. was born in Corinth, Me., on Jan- 
uary 27, 1812. He became a farmer. When 
he started out for himself, he settled in 
Levant, Me. ; but the last years of his life 
were spent in Hermon, Me., where he died 
at eighty-one years of age. He married Miss 
Mary Borne, a daughter of Deacon R. Borne, 
of Readfield, Me. She died in 1889, at the 
age of sixty-seven years, leaving an only son, 
William B., who was born on February 5, 
1837, in Levant, Me. 

William B. Peabody, who is now living 
with his son in Lakeville, Conn., lived at one 
time in West Corinth, Me. He was married 
January i, 1859, to Miss Julia Bachelder, a 
daughter of Nathaniel Bachelder. She died 
in 1892, fifty-four years of age. The fruit of 
their union was eight children; namely, Julia 
I., Sarah L., E. L., Mary A., Lorenzo J., 
Francis S., Bernice F., and George H. Julia 
I. and Sarah L. are deceased; and Francis 
S. married Hattie French. 

E. L. Peabody received his early education 
in the public schools of West Corinth, Me. 
After attaining his majority, he attended 
Lewiston Academy, and still later entered 
Bates College. He at first engaged in teach- 
ing, following that profession for about seven 
seasons, after which he entered the hotel busi- 
ness. Since 1891 he has resided in Lake- 
ville, where he conducts the Wononsco House 
and in connection therewith a livery stable. 
This comfortable, homelike, and well-con- 
ducted house, although kept open the year 
round, is more especially a summer hotel. 
Every summer the guests who gather there tax 
it to its fullest capacity. The drives in the 



362 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



immediate vicinity are most delightful, and 
present such a variety of scenery as to merit 
the attention of all lovers of the picturesque. 
The late Rev. Henry Ward Beecher wrote of 
the town, "A week spent at Lakeville will 
tempt you back again and again." 



fWju 



ILBERT N. CROSBY, a prosperous 
Vp I farmer of Lanesville, New Milford, 
who is now retired from active work, 
was born in Patterson, Putnam County, N.Y., 
February 6, 1821, son of Amaziah and Sally 
(Perry) Crosby. His grandfather, James 
Crosby, was born in Putnam County, New 
York, February 17, 1763. He was a farmer 
and a large land-owner, and was one of the 
leading citizens of the town where he lived. 
In political matters he favored the Demo- 
cratic party. He died June 20, 1843. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Deborah Pad- 
dock, was born October 27, 1767, and passed 
from life November 21, 1837. Their union 
was blessed by the following children: Ama- 
ziah, father of Gilbert N., born June 5, 1790; 
Mahala, who was born November 24, 1791, 
and died December 24, 18 14; Betsey, born 
August 25, 1796, wife of Stephen Perry; 
Polly, born January 8, 1798, wife of Marvin 
Wilson; David P., who was born April 30, 
1 80s, and died August 26, 1826; and Daniel, 
who was born May 4, 1808, and died Novem- 
ber 15, 1836. 

Amaziah Crosby learned the carpenter's 
trade, and, when the War of 181 2 broke out, 
went on call to New London, Conn., as an 
army carpenter. Some time after his return 
from army service he sold his property in Pat- 
terson, N.Y., and removed to New Milford, 
purchasing a farm. Politically, Mr. Crosby, 
like his father, was a Democrat. He died 
March 2, 1854. On February 9, 1814, he 



was married to Sally, daughter of Simeon 
Perry, of Putnam County, New York. Mrs. 
Crosby outlived her husband many years, and 
drew a pension from the government on ac- 
count of his services in war-time. She died 
in 1878, being then in her eighty-eighth year. 
Eight children were born to Amaziah and 
Sally (Perry) Crosby, namely: Emeline, born 
January 4, 181 5; William J., born October 
22, 1816, who married Catherine Shears; 
Mary E., born February 4, 18 19, wife of 
D. D. Marsh; Gilbert N., the subject of this 
sketch; Francis P., born April 26, 1823, who 
married Mary Camp; Frederick E., born Feb- 
ruary II, 1826, who married Rachel Barnum; 
Lydia A., born May 28, 1829, wife of Charles 
Couch; and Calvin C, born December i, 
1831, who married Abigail Williarns. 

Gilbert N. Crosby, on reaching man's 
estate, engaged in farming and cattle dealing. 
Progressive and energetic, he soon developed 
his business to large proportions, going West 
to buy cattle, and selling them in Eastern 
markets at a good advantage. His first vent- 
ure in the line of real estate investment was 
the purchase of the homestead which had be- 
longed to his father. Seven years later he 
bought the Wildman property. This was a 
good farm of sixty-five acres, and Mr. Crosby 
made many improvements. Later he bought 
the Bristol place, a farm of one hundred and 
thirty acres, which was his home for twenty- 
two years. He built new barns, remodelled 
many of the buildings, and made several radi- 
cal changes for the better in the estate. In 
1894 he rented his farms, and, moving to 
Lanesville, took up his residence on the 
Warner estate, with the intention of retiring 
from active work; but his disposition is such 
that rest is an impossibility, and he still finds 
something to keep him busy. 

March 18, 1844, Mr. Crosby was united in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



363 



marriage with Martha, daughter of Joseph and 
Sybil (Goodrich) Marsh, of Vergennes, Vt., 
where Mrs. Crosby was born. She died Octo- 
ber 19, 1892, aged seventy-two years, leaving 
three children, as follows: George W., born 
December 12, 1845, who lives on one of his 
father's farms; Frederick E., born August 17, 
1847, who has charge of another farm; and 
Mary J., born April i, 1855, who superin- 
tends her father's household. George W. 
Crosby is unmarried. Frederick E. was mar- 
ried May 13, 1869, to Amelia E. Osborne, 
and has had three children: Maude, born July 
7, 1870; Alberta M., born May 8, 1876; and 
Lewis G., who was born November 28, 1880, 
and died March 10, 1881. Mr. Crosby votes 
the Democratic ticket. On religious matters 
his views are liberal. Wise, energetic, and 
industrious, he is a man who wins the respect 
of. all with whom he comes in contact. 



rOHN B. WHITEHEAD, of Washing- 
ton, a veteran of the Civil War, who 
now owns and conducts a valuable farm 
situated in the vicinity of Washington Depot, 
was born in New Milford, January 4,. 1824, 
son of John B., Sr., and Emeline (West) 
Whitehead. Mr. Whitehead's grandfather, 
Hezekiah Whitehead, who was previously a 
resident of Kent, moved from that town to 
New Milford, where he passed the remainder 
ot his life. He married Olive Buckley, and 
raised^a family of four children, as follows: 
John B., Sr. ; Sarah, who became Mrs. Hal- 
lock; Lucinda, who is now Mrs. Soule; and 
Turney, who married Jane Hallock. 

John B. Whitehead, Sr., Mr. Whitehead's 
father, was born in Kent, April i, i793- He 
was a mason, and followed his trade through- 
out the active portion of his life. He resided 
in New Milford until 1849, when he removed 



to Burlington, Pa., where he passed the rest 
of his days, and died April 16, 1874. He 
was a Whig in politics and a Congregational- 
ist in his religious views. His wife, whose 
family resided in Colebrook, was born August 
19, 1798. She became the mother of eleven 
children, as follows: Hezekiah, who was born 
in 181 7; Hubbell, born in 18 19; Frederick, 
born in 1821; John B., Jr., the subject of 
this sketch; Jay, born in 1826; Lucy, born 
in 1829; Samuel, born in 1830; Sally, born 
in 1833; Mary, born in 1837; Bruce, born in 
1840; and Henry, born in 1843. The mother 
died December 16, 1854. 

John B. Whitehead received his education 
in the schools of his native town. After 
finishing his studies, he learned the car- 
penter's trade, which he followed during his 
earlier years. At the age of twenty-one he 
settled in Washington, where, not to count 
one year during which he served in the Civil 
War, he has since been engaged in farming 
with success. He is prominent among the 
leading farmers of his locality, and enjoys the 
esteem of his fellow-townsmen. 

In 1848 Mr. Whitehead was united in mar- 
riage to Mary E. Frost, a daughter of Jareb 
and Laura (Hine) Frost, of Washington. 
Mr. Frost, who was a carpenter and wagon- 
maker, an industrious man and a useful citi- 
zen, died at the age of sixty-six. His chil- 
dren are: Joseph Frost and Mrs. Mary E. 
Whitehead. His wife lived to the age of 
eighty-five years. Mr. and Mrs. Whitehead 
have reared seven children. They are: Edwin 
C, who married Helen Fenn, daughter of 
John Fenn, and has four children —Lucy F., 
Joseph F., Philmon B., and Mabel V. ; Laura 
H.; Lucy, who is now Mrs. Brague, and has 
three children — Laura H., Charles B., and 
Roy E. ; Louise, who is now. Mrs. Du Bois; 
Sarah, who is now Mrs. Smith, and has four 



364 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



children — Charles B., Mary E., Nelson S., 
and Edwin I.; Jane B., who died at the age 
of twenty-eight years; and Hattie, who is now 
Mrs. Hine, and has one daughter, named 
Jeanette. Mr. Whitehead is a Republican in 
politics, and in his religious views he is a 
Congregationalist. Edwin C, Mr. White- 
head's son, is an active member of the Wash- 
ington Grange, No. 11. 




|RS. SARAH K. HINE, a highly 
respected resident of Washington, 
this county and State, and widow 
of the late Edward J. Hine, was born in 
Washington, Dutchess County, N.Y., Novem- 
ber 3, 1836, and is a daughter of John and 
Christiana (Thomson) Senior. Her father 
was a native of Dorsetshire, England, who 
came to this country, and settled in Danbury, 
Conn. He was a son of William and Sarah 
(Harvey) Senior, both of whom were natives 
of England, and passed their last years in the 
United States, Mrs. Senior attaining the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-two years. They reared 
thirteen children; namely, William, Eliza- 
beth, John, Sarah, George, Christopher, 
Ann, Thomas, Christopher, second, Edward, 
Louisa, Henry, and Joseph. John Senior, 
Mrs. nine's father, removed from Danbury, 
Conn., to Dutchess County, New York, where 
he resided for some time, subsequently return- 
ing to Connecticut. He later went to Penn- 
sylvania, in which State he spent the rest of 
his life, and died October 19, 1878. His 
wife, Christiana Thomson, who was born in 
New Jersey in 181 2, was a daughter of Alex- 
ander and Jane (Crozier) Thomson, her father 
being a native of Scotland, and her mother of 
Ireland. Mrs. Senior's parents reared eight 
children: Christiana, Agnes, John, Allen, 
Isabella, Mary, Maria, and Jane. Mrs. John 



Senior became the mother of four children, as 
follows: Sarah K., the subject of this sketch; 
Mary, who is now Mrs. Payne, and has one 
daughter — Adah; Edwin T., who married 
Sara Barnard, and has four children — Belle, 
Mary, Bessie C, and Ada; and Belle, who 
became Mrs. Shepardson, and died at the early 
age of twenty-two years, leaving one son, 
George by name. Mrs. John Senior still sur- 
vives. 

Sarah K. Senior was married in 1858 to 
Edward J. Hine, of Washington, Conn. Her 
husband was born at the Hine homestead in 
Washington, March 5, 1831, only son of Jon- 
athan N. and Jennet (Pond) Hine. His pater- 
nal grandfather was Jonathan Hine; and his 
immediate ancestors were prominent residents 
of Washington, the family being an old and 
highly respected one in that locality. Mr. 
Hine died January 11, 1895. He and his 
wife were the parents of three children, as 
follows: Mary J., now Mrs. George Hurlburt; 
Henry J., who married Harriet E. Whitehead, 
daughter of John Whitehead, of Washington, 
and hais one daughter, named Jennet; and 
Christiana. 




ELDEN MINOR, whose likeness is 
here seen, is a prominent meat mer- 
chant of Winsted and a man well 
known to the sporting world as the owner and 
breeder of fine horses. He was born in Plym- 
outh, Hartford County, Conn., August 28, 
1 841, son of Newell and Mary Ann (Hall) 
Minor. His paternal grandfather was a 
farmer in Wolcott, where he was born in 1760, 
and died about 1850. He reared a family of 
three daughters and four sons, all of whom 
were long-lived, one son, Hiram Minor, liv- 
ing to be ninety years of age. Newell Minor, 
who was born in Wolcott in 181 1, was a well- 
known drover, and at his death, which oc- 




SELDEN MINOR. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



367 



curred in 1861, left an estate valued at forty 
thousand dollars. He was married in 1833; 
and his wife, who was born in 181 3, died in 
1857, at the age of forty-four. They had four 
children, namely: Emily, who married Ed- 
ward Dailey, of Canton, Conn., one of the 
firm of Dailey & Lincoln, wagon manufact- 
urers, and died in 1878, leaving one son; 
Harriet, who died in childhood; Selden, of 
whom we write; George L., Chief of Police 
in Westfield, Mass., for the past eighteen 
years. The latter was a soldier in the Civil 
War, enlisting at Meriden, Conn., and during 
the three years of his sojourn seeing some 
hard service. He spent ten days in the prison 
pen at Andersonville, but was so fortunate as 
to be exchanged at the end of that time. 

Selden Minor received his education in the 
district schools, and was reared to the stock 
business, so that from early youth he has been 
a connoisseur of fine animals. He has bred 
and raised some fine-blooded and speedy stock, 
among which may be named Avalon, four- 
year-old, out of Modjeska by Royal Fear- 
naught, sired by Alcantara; Lady Lancelot, 
three-year-old, same dam, sired by Lancelot, 
youngest son of Green Mountain Maid, mother 
of Electioneer, who was the greatest sire liv- 
ing. In 1890 Mr. Minor sold three of his 
young trotters to one man for sixty-seven hun- 
dred dollars. These were full-blooded rela- 
tions, from three to four years old, and had 
trotted in 2.ig and 2.23. He now has two 
stud colts: Castaneum, two-year old, at the 
Allen Farm, very promising and handsome; 
and Lancelot, a yearling, own brother to the 
above. Besides his horses Mr. Minor keeps 
from three to five of the best fox hounds, 
reputed to be the coldest-nosed and the most 
tenacious of their kind, staying upon the trail 
from twenty-four to thirty-six hours; and he 
himself bears the reputation of a first-class 



hunter, having inherited from his father a 
love of field sports. He also owns a number 
of working horses, employing them in connec- 
tion with his meat business, in which he has 
been engaged for thirty years. During the 
past thirteen years he has been located in 
Winsted, and before that he was employed in 
Canton, New York City, and New Britain, 
Conn. 

Mr. Minor has been twice married. His 
first wife, Fanny E., daughter of John Brain- 
ard, of New Haven, died in 1875, at the age 
of thirty, leaving a son, Newell B., and 
daughter, Ella E., who live with their father, 
the son having charge of the horses. In 
June, 1877, Mr. Minor took to his home his 
second wife, Mrs. Fannie Holcomb, daughter 
of George Mills, of Canton. She had by her 
first husband one daughter, Lillie Holcomb, a 
beautiful young lady, who passed to the better 
life in 1883, in her seventeenth year. 

Mrs. Minor is a communicant of the Epis- 
copal church. Mr. Minor settled in his pres- 
ent home, 25 Wheeler Street, in 1890, and 
has expended some four thousand dollars on 
the estate, which he has greatly improved, 
building a fine barn for his horses and fox 
hounds. 



'Crr)/lLLIAM 
Wl/ well-ir 



ILLIAM MOREY, who operates a 
Improved and productive farm 
in Kent, was born in Washington, 
N.Y., September 26, 1838, son of Stephen 
and Susan (Way) Morey. Mr. Morey's pa- 
ternal grandfather was James Morey, a native 
of Dutchess County, New York, where he re- 
sided during his entire life, engaged in agri- 
culture. He reared two sons, Stephen and 
Silas. Stephen Morey, Mr. Morey's father, 
was born in Washington, N.Y. He learned 
the trade of a hatter, which he followed in 
early manhood. During the Civil War he 



368 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was employed as overseer of a powder-house 
at a military station ; and, after the close of 
-the great fratricidal struggle, he went to New 
Milford, Conn., where he resided for ten 
years. He subsequently returned to Dutchess 
County, New York, where he passed the re- 
mainder of his life, dying at the age of 
eighty-seven years. His wife, Susan Way, 
became the mother of eleven children, as 
follows: Collins, who married Rebecca Pot- 
ter, and has two children — Francis and Mary; 
Philinda, who became Mrs. Chinchbox, and 
is the mother of twelve children; Truman, 
who married Mary Gardner, and has two 
children; Stephen J., who married Jane Grif- 
fin, and has five children; John, who married 
Mary Hitchcock, and has four children; 
Elizabeth; Sarah, who became Mrs. Tuttle, 
and has two children; Alonzo, who married 
Ann Brown; Maria, who is now Mrs. Hub- 
bard, and has four children; William, the 
subject of this sketch; and Lydia, who be- 
came Mrs. Tongue, and has two children. 
Mrs. Stephen Morey, like her husband, lived 
to reach the age of eighty-seven years. 

William Morey acquired the rudiments of 
learning in the common schools, and was 
reared to agricultural pursuits. He has re- 
sided in Kent for the past twenty-three years, 
during which time he has gained a reputation 
as a useful citizen and industrious man. He 
is a skilled farmer, and makes a specialty of 
dairying, in which branch of his calling he is 
very successful. 

In 1862 Mr. Morey was united in marriage 
to Ann Leek, daughter of Nelson Leek; and 
he has five children, namely: Allie; Ida; 
Charles, who married Ella Thomas; Nelson; 
and William, Jr. Mrs. Morey died at the age 
of forty-seven. Mr. Morey is a Democrat in 
politics, and in his religious views a Congre- 
gational ist. 




ENRY B. BOSTWICK, a progres- 
sive farmer of Merryall District, 
^ V^ , New Milford, was born in the 
house in which he now lives, March 17, 1853. 
He is a son of Isaac and Lavinia A. (Sher- 
man) Bostwick, and grandson of Joseph E. and 
Charity (Edwards) Bostwick, all natives of 
this county. His first ancestor in this coun- 
try was Arthur Bostwick; and from him the 
line is traced through John, Joseph, and 
Joseph E., Sr., the latter having been the 
great-grandfather of Henry B. Bostwick. 
Joseph E., Sr., who was born in Milford in 
1728, settled in the Upper Merryall District, 
which was then sparsely inhabited, upon about 
four hundred acres of land purchased by him. 
Here he established a forge, and was soon in 
possession of a thriving business in forging 
iron into such useful shapes as were needed by 
his neighbors. He also erected a saw-mill, 
and it was he who built the house where his 
great-grandson was born. This last was com- 
pleted in 1779, and was one of the finest houses 
in the county at that time, boasting four 
large fireplaces. He built spacious barns, as 
he dealt somewhat in cattle. After a busy 
life he died at the age of eighty-four. He 
was twice married, his first wife leaving six 
children: David, Elnathan, Joseph, Zachariah, 
Ebenezer, and Charles. His second wife, 
whose maiden name was Anna Hurd, bore him 
four children: Joanna, Betsey, Andrew, and 
Joseph E. Joseph E., the grandfather of 
Henry B. Bostwick, was born on the home- 
stead in 1774, and in course of time became 
owner of the estate. He also kept a hotel, 
which stood where L. Wilson's house now is; 
and he dealt in iron ore and marble, there 
being a marble quarry on the Bostwick estate. 
A public-spirited citizen, he was an enthusi- 
astic supporter of Whig principles, and took a 
lively interest in the politics of the day. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



369 



was a man of great nervous energy, who hardly 
knew what it was to rest, until at the age of 
seventy he was called to rest forever. His 
wife, Charity (Edwards) Bostwick, was born 
December 27, 1788, and died February 9, 
1866. She was the mother of four children: 
Betsey A., Evander, Isaac B., and J. Eliza. 

Isaac B. Bostwick, the father of Henry B., 
was born November 7, 1814. He received a 
good education in the schools of his native 
town; and, when a boy, he became familiar 
with farm work. Succeeding to the ownership 
of the homestead, besides carrying on general 
farming, he worked the marble quarries to 
even better advantage than his father had 
done, burning the refuse for lime and cutting 
and marking his own marble. He died Janu- 
ary 19, 1892. On November 7, 1836, he was 
married to Lavinia A., daughter of Justin and 
Phebe (Maine) Sherman and grand-daughter of 
Eli and Polly (Phelps) Sherman, all natives 
of New Milford. Her grandparents were 
early residents of New Milford. They were 
engaged in farming. They subsequently 
moved to Vermont; but Mrs. Bostwick's 
father remained in New Milford, occupied in 
agricultural pursuits up to the time of his 
death, which occurred when he was fifty-three 
years of age. His wife lived to be sixty-six 
years old. They reared nine children: La- 
vinia A., Eli, Lucy A., Henry D., Emily H., 
Julia M., Polly O., Celia, and Rachel J. 
Mrs. Bostwick is still living. Besides her 
son, Henry B., the subject of this sketch, 
she has one daughter, Marion B., born June 25, 
1844, who married M. B. Healey, and has two 
children, Lavinia A. and Henry B. She 
resides in Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Henry B. Bostwick received a good educa- 
tion, attending school in his native town, in 
Middletown, and in Bridgeport. His father's 
health failing while he was pursuing his 



studies, he was obliged to leave school, and re- 
turn home to attend to the affairs of the home 
stead, where he has since remained. He has 
made many radical improvements on the es- 
tate, remodelling the buildings and otherwise 
using the land to the best advantage. He is 
now successfully engaged in general farming, 
making a specialty of tobacco and keeping a 
first-class dairy. Mr. Bostwick is a well-in- 
formed man, and pursues his calling according 
to the best methods. He stands high in the 
estimation of his neighbors, and ranks among 
the most valued citizens of New Milford. 
His political creed is Republican, while his 
religious belief is Episcopalian. Mr. Bost- 
wick is not married. 




ILAS D. DAVIS, a highly esteemed 
resident of Kent, was born in Wes- 
ton, Conn., February 21, 1827, son 
of Silas D. and Lucinda (Bronson) Davis. 
His grandfather was Ebenezer Davis, a native 
of Weston, who lived to reach the advanced 
age of ninety years. 

His son, Silas D. Davis, Sr., was a life- 
long resident of Weston, where he was suc- 
cessfully engaged in farming. He possessed 
many estimable qualities, but died in 1827 in 
comparatively early manhood, aged thirty-five 
years. His wife, Lucinda Bronson, who was 
a daughter of Silas Bronson, of Kent, became 
the mother of three children, namely: Polly, 
who became Mrs. A. Rolla Merwin, and was 
the mother of three children; Betsey, who be- 
came Mrs. Mansfield Morgan, and had six 
children; and Silas D. , the subject of this 
sketch. Mrs. Silas D. Davis, Sr., married 
for her second husband Truman Hawley, and 
by this union there was one son, Edward. He 
was twice married, first to Susan Young, who 
died leaving one daughter, Rosetta, and second 



370 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



to Mrs. Dotha (Wedge) Harrington. Mrs. 
Silas D. Davis, Sr., died in 1884, aged 
eighty-six years. 

Silas D. Davis came to Kent in early child- 
hood, and received his education in the schools 
of this town. When a young man, he learned 
the harness-maker's trade, which he followed 
for several years, including five years in New 
Preston. He then for two years followed the 
same occupation in New Haven, after which 
he returned to Kent, where he has since re- 
sided. He has most of his life been an active 
and energetic man, but for the past few years 
has suffered from disability. On January 24, 
1853, Mr. Davis was united in marriage to 
Amarinda Beardsley, daughter of Horace 
Beardsley, of Kent. He has two children liv- 
ing, namely: Scott, who married Flora Dwy, 
daughter of Nelson Dwy, of Kent, and has one 
son, Frank by name ; and John, who married 
Cora Dwy, daughter of Nelson Dwy, and has 
two children, named Raymond and Hattie, re- 
spectively. Another child, the eldest, Hattie 
A., born June 6, 1857, died September 9, 
1863. Mr. Davis's wife died in 1892, aged 
sixty-one years. 




)EVI E. CURTIS, the hospitable pro- 
prietor of the Woodbury Hotel, was 
born in the town of Sherman, Fair- 
field County, Conn., May 25, 1840. His par- 
ents were Stiles and Amelia (Munrowe) 
Curtis. William Curtis, the earliest known 
ancestor, with his four children, Thomas, 
Mary, John, and Philip, embarked from Eng- 
land in the ship "Lion" on June 22, 1632, 
and landed at Scituate, Mass., on December 
16, 1632. He subsequently removed to Strat- 
ford, Conn. Many of this name in New Eng- 
land and other parts of the United States are 
descendants of his. Stiles Curtis, the grand- 



father, was born in Stratford, but settled in 
early life in the town of Sherman, where he 
was known as a progressive farmer. His wife 
was Fanny (Paddock) Curtis; and they had six 
children — Stiles, Abner, Ross, Hannah, 
Phebe, and Mary. 

Stiles Curtis, father of Levi E. Curtis, was 
born in Sherman, and there became a cattle 
dealer to quite an extent. Later he gave up 
that business, devoting his time to farming in 
New Milford, where he owned an excellent 
farm. He married Amelia, a daughter of 
David and Amelia (Munrowe) Munrowe. 
They had two children : Levi, the subject of 
this biography; and George H. Curtis. 

Levi E. Curtis was educated in New Mil- 
ford. At the age of twenty he began dealing 
in cattle, which he fattened and butchered, 
shipping the carcasses to the city market. 
After spending four years in this business, he 
engaged in the manufacture of hats, which 
proved to be profitable. The confinement im- 
posed upon him by this occupation became 
objectionable, and after five years he began 
dealing in horses. He handled a great many 
fine roadsters each year, which he broke and 
sold for fancy teams. This business he fol- 
lowed for four years in Danbury, meeting with 
much success. Mr. Curtis at the same time 
carried on the produce business, buying and 
shipping to the city market. In 1874 he 
undertook the management of a hotel at Corn- 
wall Bridge, where he continued for eight 
years, until 1882, when he sold out. He then 
bought the McMurtree estate, known as the 
Woodbury Hotel, at Woodbury. This house 
was built for a hotel in 1754 by Anthony 
Stoddard. Mr. Curtis has remodelled it, and 
erected an addition thereto, putting in modern 
conveniences and refurnishing. The house is 
very comfortable, and exceedingly well patron- 
ized. The many city boarders who visit it 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



371 



each season say that the management thereof 
could not be better. Attached to the house 
is a fine livery, supplied with first-class turn- 
outs, which attract admiring attention from all 
patrons of this popular establishment. 

On November 3, 1870, Mr. Curtis and Eliza 
Knapp were united in marriage. His wife 
was a daughter of John and Minerva (More- 
house) Knapp. Her father, a farmer in Pem- 
broke, Conn., was a son of Levi and Lizzie 
(Hamilton) Knapp. Levi Knapp was born 
May I, 1777, and died at the age of ninety. 
His wife was born in 1781, and lived to be 
seventy-eight years of age. Their children 
were: Florinda, Maria, Ann, Gregory, John, 
Ruth, Laura, James, and Alexander. John 
Knapp, the father of Mrs. Curtis, died at the 
age of forty-one. The mother lived to the age 
of fifty-seven years. Their children were: 
George and Florinda, who were twins ; Susan ; 
and Eliza. Mr. and Mrs. Curtis have had 
seven children: Levi, born August 23, 1874, 
who died September 22, 1874; Grace E., born 
September 10, 1875; Rossie, born June 19, 
1878, who died March 9, 1881 ; Leah Edna, 
born March 24, 1881; Edith Estelle, born 
June 20, 1884; Tessie, born on September 5, 
18